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Founded  in  1924 


NATIONAL  KWr?:Wm  CO”"  NY,  INC 

GEMER, LiESARY 


‘SERVICE 


Radio  —  Television 

—  FM  — 

Communications 

2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 

Washington  8,  D.  C. 

Robert 

D.  Heinl,  Editor 

INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  JULY  2,  1947 


HECEIVEU 
JUL  7  mi 

NUB1 1RAMMEU. 


Pearson  Blasts  FCC  Nominee;  Rep.  Jones  Denies  Klan  Charge . 1 

Son  of  Bond  Geddes,  RMA  Vice-President,  Killed  In  Auto  Crash . 3 

"Many  Will  See  Washington  For  1st  Time  By  TV"  -  Trammell . 4 

WRC-FM  Broadcast  Station  Begins  Operations . 

Schuette  Reported  On  The  High  Road  Following  Hospitai  Siege’. !!!!!’. 


British  Commonwealth  Circuits  Argument  Set  For  August  8 

Ralph  Atlass  Applies  For  $200,000  TV  Station  For  Chicago!..;*.!!!!; 

NAB  Changes  Network  Membership  From  Active  to  Associate . 


Six  Companies  Oppose  Press  Wireless . 

Congressional  Inquiry  Demands  Petrillo  Appear  July  7 . 9 

Sen.  White  Throws  Up  Sponge  For  Radio  Bill . . . 10 

Merle  Jones  Returns  To  CBS  As  General  Manager  Of  WCCO. .!’.!!..!.! 10 

Surplus  Walkie-Talkies  Can't  Be  Used  For  Citizens  Radio . 11 

Fcrt  Industry  Enters  Detroit  Through  WJ3K  In  $700,000  Deal . 12 

CBS  Sued  For  $250,000 . .  . . .,...12 

RCA  Opens  Radio-Telegraph  Circuit  To  Greece . 12 

Scissors  And  Paste 

Trade  Notes 


No.  1781 


15 


CD  CD  <l\l  CT> 


.  f ; ; 


July  2,  1947 


PEARSON  BLASTS  FCC  NOMINEE  -  REP.  JONES  DENIES  KLAN  CHARGE 


As  a  follow-up  in  his  fight  against  the  confirmation  of 
Representative  Robert  F.  Jones  ( R) ,  of  Ohio,  FCC  nominee,  Drew 
Pearson,  ABC  radio  commentator,  has  sent  Senator  Wallace  White  of 
Maine,  an  affidavit  from  Glenn  E.  Webb,  an  Ohio  labor  leader,  that 
Webb,  former  head  of  the  Black  Legion,  said  to  be  the  successor  of 
the  Ku  Klux  Klan,  had  initiated  Representative  Jones  into  the  Legion. 

Despite  this  latest  move  on  the  part  of  Mr.  Pearson, 
friends  of  Representative  Jones,  still  seemed  confident  that  the 
Ohio  Congressman  would  be  confirmed  when  the  subcommittee  meets 
tomorrow  (July  3)  to  further  consider  the  matter. 

The  Webb  affidavit  follows: 

"I,  Glenn  E.  Webb,  hereby  being  duly  sworn,  swear  on  oath 
that  I  initiated  Robert  F.  Jones  into  the  Black  Legion  on  the 
Tapscott  Farm,  east  of  Lima,  Ohio.  Robert  Jones  kneeled  before  me 
where  I  could  see  him  face  to  face  -  with  a  gun  at  his  back  accord¬ 
ing  to  our  ritual  as  he  accepted  the  oath  of  obligation.  The  cere¬ 
mony  took  place  around  1935.  " 

The  affidavit  was  labelled  by  the  Ohio  Congressman  "a  most 
vicious  and  malicious  lie”  in  a  statement  given  to  Robert  C.  Barton, 
Managing  Editor  of  the  Lima  News.  Barton  quoted  Representative  Jones 
as  saying  that  Webb,  a  member  of  the  Executive  Board  of  the  Lima 
local  of  the  CIO  United  Electrical  Workers,  was  attempting  to  "destroy 
a  person  whom  he  could  not  control  in  public  life". 

Mr.  Jones  declared  the  CIO  had  "spent  an  estimated  $25,000" 
in  an  attempt  to  defeat  him  in  the  last  election. 

The  Lima  News  Managing  Editor  said  Webb  signed  the  affida¬ 
vit  in  the  presence  of  him  and  Robert  Waldron,  another  member  of  the 
News*  staff.  He  said  the  form  of  the  affidavit  was  dictated  over 
the  telephone  by  Drew  Pearson. 

Mr.  Pearson  testifying  before  asubcommittee  of  the  Senate 
Interstate  Commerce  Committee,  of  which  Senator  Brewster  (r),  of 
Maine  is  Chairman,  had  e  xpressed  doubt  that  Representative  Jones, 
nominated  to  succeed  Ray  C.  Wakefield  on  the  Federal  Communications 
Commission,  would,  as  an  FCC  member,  give  him  (Pearson)  and  his 
associates  a  fair  hearing  on  their  application  for  a  Baltimore  radio 
station  license.  He  said  he  based  the  statement  on  "evidence"  from 
Jones1  own  Lima,  Ohio,  district. 

Representative  Jones,  he  said,  "has  been  personally  ident¬ 
ified  with  one  of  the  most  anti-Semitic,  Fascist-inclined  figures  in 
this  country  -  namely,  Gerald  L.  K.  Smith. " 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/2/47 


Furthermore,  he  said,  while  he  had  no  personal  knowledge 
that  Jones  was  a  Klansman,  his  Information  was  that  the  Congressman’s 
father  in  the  early  20’ s  had  introduced  his  son  to  others  as  nthe 
youngest  member  of  the  Ku  Klux  Klan.  " 

"I  regret  to  make  the  even  more  serious  charge  that  the 
evidence  I  have  received  ...  is  that  he  was  a  member  of  an  equally 
bigoted  organization  -  anti- Catholic  and  anti- Jewish  -  namely  the 
Black  Legion. ” 

Representative  Jones  called  these  statements  ’’unmitigated 
lies”.  In  a  recent  column,  Drew  Pearson  charged  that  Mr.  Wakefield 
was  dropped  after  he  voted  to  reject  a  radio  station  application 
from  Robert  Bartley,  a  nephew  of  House  Democratic  Leader  Sam  Rayburn 
of  Texas, 

The  Congressman  said  he  understood  that  Rayburn  had  sponsor¬ 
ed  him,  probably  along  with  other  Democrats  as  well  as  Republicans. 

Mr.  Pearson  said  Wakefield  also  voted  against  an  applica¬ 
tion  for  a  Cincinnati  radio  station  which  had  been  filed  by  Leonard 
Reinsch,  the  Present’ s  radio  coach. 

"But  I  don’t  know  if  that  had  anything  to  do  with  it  or 
not”,  he  mused. 

Mr.  Pearson’s  letter  to  Senator  White,  Chairman  of  the 
Senate  Interstate  Commerce  Committee,  follows: 

"Enclosed  is  a  sworn  affidavit  from  Mr.  Virgil  H.  Ef finger, 
former  head  of  the  Black  Legion,  relative  to  the  membership  of 
Representative  Robert  F.  Jones  of  Ohio  in  that  organization. 

"I  am  further  informed  that  Mr.  Jones’  induction  ceremony 
into  the  Black  Legion  took  place  on  the  Tapscott  Farm  on  the  Eell- 
fontain  Road  near  the  Erie  Railroad  outside  of  Lima  and  was  admin¬ 
istered  to  Congressman  Jones  by  Glenn  E.  Webb,  of  Lima,  at  that  time 
a  member  of  the  initiation  crew  of  the  Black  Legion.  Mr.  Webb  is 
available  as  a  witness  and  the  Senate  of  the  United  States  would  be 
remiss  in  its  duty  if  it  failed  to  cross-examine  him. 

"The  files  of  the  United  States  Senate  Committee  on  Labor 
and  Education,  and  the  Subcommittee  on  Civil  Liberties,  headed  by 
your  former  colleague,  Senator  LaFollette  of  Wisconsin,  contain 
documentary  evidence  of  the  anti-Semitic,  anti- Catholic,  anti-Negro, 
and  anti-labor  activities  of  the  Black  Legion  in  Ohio  and  Michigan 
a  few  years  ago.  At  a  time  when  the  government  of  the  United  States 
through  the  executive  branch  and  the  Congress  is  placing  the  most 
rigid  type  of  'loyalty'  controls  on  even  the  lowest  government 
clerks,  I  feci  it  imperative  that  equally  deliberate  scrutiny  be 
e.iven  to  candidates  for  positions  on  so  high  a  quasi- judicial  body 
as  the  Federal  Communications  Commission, 

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Hetnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/2/47 


nI  therefore  strongly  urge  that  your  committee  ask  the 
Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation  to  make  a  very  careful  study  of  the 
full  facts  and  circumstances  surrounding  Mr.  Jones*  connections 
with  the  notorious  Black  Legion  as  well  as  a  study  of  the  affili¬ 
ations  and  connections  Jones  maintained  with  the  notorious  rabble- 
rouser  Geralk  L.  K.  Smith.  The  Senate  which  is  now  being  called 
upon  to  vote  twenty-five  million  dollars  for  loyalty  investigations 
owes  it  t o  the  nation  to  spend  a  few  hundred  dollars  on  the  study 
of  a  man  whose  hands  will  be  given  a  grasp  over  millions  of  dollars 
worth  of  utilities  and  the  priceless  heritage  of  our  free  speech, 

"Evidence  already  placed  before  your  subcommittee  con¬ 
sidering  the  Jones  appointment  discloses  that  one  convicted  sedition- 
ist,  W  illiara  Dudley  pelley,  and  two  indicted  alleged  seditionists 
found  Mr.  Jones*  consistent  isolationish  speeches  and  voting  record 
both  before  and  after  pearl  Harbor  so  attuned  to  their  own  views 
that  the  Congressman  was  quoted  frequently  and  enthusiastically  by 
the  se  merchants  of  hate. 

"In  view  of  the  aforementioned,  I  respectfully  submit  that 
the  Senate  of  the  United  States  would  be  derelict  in  its  duty  if  it 
failed  to  give  the  most  careful  consideration  to  the  character  and 
background  of  Mr.  Jones  before  voting  his  confirmation  to  a  Commis¬ 
sion  which  safeguards  our  basic  freedoms  on  the  nation*  s  airwaves.  ** 

xxxxxxxxxx 

SON  OF  BOND  GEDDES,  RMA  VICE-PRESIDENT,  KILLED  IN  AUTO  CRASH 

Gail  G.  Geddes,  3  2  years  old,  a  member  of  the  staff  of  the 
National  Association  of  Manufacturers  in  New  York,  and  son  of  Bond  P. 
Geddes,  Executive  Vice-President  of  the  Radio  Manufacturers*  Associ¬ 
ation  in  Washington,  was  killed  Saturday  afternoon  when  two  cars 
collided  about  8  miles  from  Doylestown,  Pa.  His  two  daughters, 

Carol  4,  and  Olivia  3,  were  seriously  injured  in  the  crash.  Three 
passengers  in  the  car  of  Mr.  Geddes,  John  F.  Morgan,  of  Salem,  N.  J.  , 
and  his  two  sons  were  also  taken  to  Doylestown  Emergency  Hospital. 

Elmer  Frederick,  47,  of  New  Hope,  Pa.,  driver  of  the  other 
car,  and  his  wife,  Dorothy,  were  treated  for  minor  hurts.  He  was 
charged  with  involuntary  manslaughter  but  released  on  bail. 

Mr.  Geddes,  who  was  born  in  Washington  and  received  his 
early  education  here,  was  graduated  with  honors  from  Amos  Tuck  School 
of  Economics  at  Dartmouth  College,  where  he  was  elected  to  phi  Beta 
Kappa.  As  a  Navy  Lieutenant,  junior  grade,  he  served  in  the  pacific 
on  the  escort  carrier  Saginaw  Bay,  participating  in  five  major  battles 
from  Coral  Sea  to  Iwo  Jima. 

In  1940,  he  married  Miss  Lucille  Carr  in  Washington.  He 
is  also  survived  by  a  brother  Bruce  Geddes,  who  is  with  the  Columbia 
Broadcasting  System  in  Washington. 

The  funeral  was  held  at  St.  .Albans  Episcopal  Church  in 
Washington  Tuesday,  and  burial  was  in  Rock  Creek  Cemetery. 

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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/2/47 


"MANY  WILL  SEE  WASHINGTON  FOR  1ST  TIME  BY  TV",  TRAMMELL 


Speaking  at  the  dedication  of  WNBW,  the  National  Broadcast¬ 
ing  Company* s  new  half  million  dollar  television  station  in  the 
Nation* s  Capital  last  Friday,  Niles  Trammell,  President  of  the 
National  Broadcasting  Company  said: 

"From  Washington  we  expect  to  send  across  the  country  the 
sight  and  sound  of  Congress  in  session,  the  reports  of  Government 
leaders  to  the  people,  not  to  mention  the  numerous  object  of  histori¬ 
cal  and  artistic  interest  in  which  this  city  abounds.  Most  of  the 
people  in  the  United  States  will  be  seeing  Washington  for  the  first 
time  when  it  comes  to  them  by  television, 

"In  my  opinion,  television  is  destined  to  perform  a  very 
definite  service  in  our  American  system  of  government.  For  the 
first  time,  the  candidate  for  public  office  will  be  seen  and  heard 
by  large  numbers  of  voters  -  face  to  face,  at  close  range  -  in  the 
privacy  of  their  own  homes.  This  will  be  a  wholesome  influence  in 
determining  the  type  of  elected  representatives  who  will  come  to  this 
capital  and  to  the  capitals  of  the  48  States. 

"Because  television  will  play  such  an  important  part  in 
the  field  of  public  affairs,  the  National  Broadcasting  Company  takes 
great  pride  in  establishing  here  in  Washington  the  finest  and  most 
modern  television  station  that  has  ever  been  built  up  to  this  time.  " 

Said  Charles  R.  Denny,  Jr.,  Chairman  of  the  Federal  Com¬ 
munications  Commission: 

"WNBW  is  the  nation* s  eleventh  television  station.  The 
cities  besides  Washington  and  New  York  which  have  television  stations 
are  Philadelphia,  Schenectady,  Detroit,  Chicago,  St.  Louis  and  Los 
Angeles.  Fifty-four  additional  television  stations  are  under  con¬ 
struction  in  38  cities  throughout  the  country.  Most  of  these  will 
be  completed  and  on  the  air  by  the  middle  of  next  year. 

"Last  month  more  than  8,500  sets  were  produced.  This  is 
about  the  total  number  of  sets  we  had  in  the  country  on  V-J  Day. 

"The  Federal  Communications  Commission  has  firm  confidence 
in  the  future  of  television  and  will  take  every  step  to  assist  the 
radio  industry  in  giving  the  American  people  the  finest  television 
service  attainable. " 

Losing  no  time  in  fulfilling  one  of  the  principal  object¬ 
ives  mentioned  by  Mr.  Trammell  -  that  of  covering  Washington  -  WN^W 
picked  up  President  Truman  by  remote  control  last  Sunday  when  Mr. 
Truman  addressed  a  meeting  of  the  National  Association  for  the 
Advancement  of  Colored  People  at  the  Lincoln  Memorial.  This  was  fed 
by  Coaxial  cable  to  the  country* s  first  television  network. 


-  4  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/2/47 


Chief  Justice  Fred  M.  Vinson,  and  Attorney  General  Tom  C. 
Clark  headed  the  list  of  distinguished  guests  at  the  opening  of  WNEW 
Friday  night  at  its  newly  established  studios  in  Wardman  Park  Hotel. 
Among  others  were  Senator  Arthur  Capper,  of  Kansas,  Senator  Joseph 
H.  Ball,  of  Minnesota,  Representative  Clarence  Brown,  of  Ohio,  and 
Representative  Edith  Nourse  Rogers  of  Massachusetts. 

The  Communications  Commission  was  represented  by  Chairman 
Charles  R,  Denny  and  Commissioners  Clifford  J.  Durr,  Rosel  H.  Hyde, 

E.  K.  Jett,  Paul  A.  Walker  and  Ray  C.  Wakefield. 

Among  NBC  higher-ups  who  came  down  from  New  York  for  the 
occasion,  in  addition  to  Mr*  Trammell,  were  Frank  E.  Mullen,  Vice- 
President  and  General  Manager,  and  Orrin  E.  IXmlap,  Director  of 
Advertising,  Radio  Corporation  of  America.  Also  present  was  F.  P. 
Guthrie,  Assistant  Vice-President  of  RCA  Communications. 

Present  also  were  Eben  Ayres,  Secretary  to  President 
Truman,  Representative  Bui winkle;  Carl  Burkland,  Manager,  WTOP; 
Senator  Homer  E.  Capehard  of  Indiana;  Martin  Co del,  Editor  of  FM 
Magazine;  T.A.M,  Craven,  Vice-President,  Cowles  Broadcasting  Co.; 
Representative  Robert  Grosser,  of  Ohio;  Representative  Everett  M. 
Dirksen,  of  Illinois:  Representative  James  I.  Dolliver,  of  Iowa; 
Warren  B.  Francis,  President,  National  Press  Club;  Earl  H.  Gammons, 
Vice  President,  Columbia  Broadcasting  System,  Washington;  Representa¬ 
tive  Leonard  W.  Hall  of  New  York;  William  D.  Hassett,  Secretary  to 
President  Truman;  Senator  Albert  W.  Hawke s,  of  New  Jersey;  Senator 
Edwin  C.  Johnson,  of  Colorado;  Representative  Robert  F.  Jones,  Ohio, 
Just  nominated  by  president  Truman  for  the  Federal  Communications 
Commission;  Senator  James  ?.  Kern,  of  Missouri;  Edward  F.  McGrady, 
Vice-president  of  RCA;  Justin  Miller,  President  of  the  National 
.Association  of  Broadcasters;  John  Callan  O’Laughlin,  publisher,  Army 
and  Navy  Journal. 

Also  Representative  John  Taber  of  New  York;  Sol  Taishoff, 
Editor,  Broadcasting  Magazine;  former  Senator  Burton  K.  Wheeler; 
Senator  Alexander  Wiley  of  Wisconsin;  A.  D.  Willard,  Jr. ,  NAB;  and 
Representative  Charles  A,  Wolverton,  of  New  Jersey. 

One  of  the  amusing  remarks  at  the  opening  performance  at 
WN^W  was  when  Attorney  General  Clark,  watching  a  speaker  being  tele¬ 
vised,  said:  ’’Give  that  fellow  a  number  and  he  would  be  a  welcome 
guest  at  the  FBI.  n 

WNBW  went  on  the  air  before  its  studios  were  completed  and 
will  offer  programs  originating  in  New  York  for  the  most  part  until 
its  film  projecting  facilities  and  television  stage  at  the  Whrdman 
Park  are  completed  late  in  the  Summer. 

Equipment  f or  t ransmitting  is  completed.  The  transmitter, 
which  cost  over  $65,000,  is  the  first  postwar  mass  production  televi¬ 
sion  transmitter  built  by  RCA.  Housed  in  what  used  to  be  the  Garden 
Room  at  Wardman  Park  Hotel,  the  transmitter  produces  a  5-kw  picture 
signal  which  is  boosted  to  20.7  kw.  as  it  radiates  from  the  tower. 
Over  ©  0  tubes  are  in  use  when  the  transmitter  is  operating. 


5 


p 


Helnl  Radi o  News  Servi c e 


7/2/47 


The  Washington  art  galleries  and  historical  point  of 
interests  will  be  used  for  broadcasts  to  local  viewers  and  to  out- 
of-town  set  owners,  since  New  York,  Philadelphia  and  Schenectady 
will  continue  to  be  linked  by  co-axial  cable.  The  cable  owned  by 
the  American  Telephone  &  Telegraph  Company  can  handle  two  televi¬ 
sion  shows  at  one  time  -  one  northbound,  the  other  southbound. 

Another  cable  is  now  under  construction.  The  two  existing  local  sta¬ 
tions  share  use  of  the  cable,  as  will  the  other  two  to  come,  unless 
a  system  of  special  relay  stations  is  built. 

Operation  of  this  new  NBC  station  is  expected  to  boost 
sales  of  receiving  sets,  which  range  in  price  from  $250  up.  Local 
dealers  took  full  advantage  of  the  occasion  to  stage  intensive  sales, 
including  introduction  of  an  RCA  Model  641-TV,  a  $795  instrument  com¬ 
bining  television  with  phonograph,  AM,  FM  and  short-wave  radio. 

Washington  has  had  some  television,  provided  by  DuMont* s 
WTTG,  for  almost  two  years.  The  new  NBC  station,  like  WTTG,  will 
operate  on  a  part-time  basis.  WMAL-TV,  the  Evening  Star  ABC  station, 
and  a  Bamberger  station  (WOR)  will  be  in  operation  by  the  end  of  the 
year. 


XXXXXXXX 

WRC-FM  BROADCAST  STATION  BEGINS  OPERATIONS 

Simultaneously  with  the  opening  of  WN3W,  the  National 
Broadcasting  Company* s  television  station  in  Washington  last  Friday, 
WRC-FM,  NBC’s  FM  station  in  the  Nation’s  Capital  began  operation. 

Both  FM  and  Television  signals  are  radiated  from  the  same 
50  foot  RCA  super  turnstile  antenna  mounted  atop  the  300  foot  tower 
on  the  grounds  of  the  Wardmen  Park  Hotel.  The  FM  transmitter  is 
designed  to  generate  a  3  kilowatt  signal,  but  the  eignal  radiated 
from  the  transmitter  tower  will  be  about  15  kw,  of  effective  power. 
The  super  turnstile  antenna  increases  the  power  of  both  the  televi¬ 
sion  and  FM  signals.  WRC-FM  can  be  heard  on  FM  channel  230  at  93.9 
megacycle  s. 


Initially,  WRC-FM  will  operate  on  a  daily  six-hour  schedule 
(3  PM  to  9  pm)  offering  a  wide  choice  of  musical  programs  and  com¬ 
prehensive  news  coverage. 

XXXXXXXX 

SCHUETTE  REPORTED  ON  THE  HIGH  ROAD  FOLLOWING  HOSPITAL  SIEGE 

Oswald  F.  Schuette,  RCA  consultant  In  Washington,  is  expect¬ 
ed  to  be  able  to  leave  Doctors  Hospital  today  (July  2nd)  following  an 
operation  for  hernia.  Mr.  Schuette* s  case  was  in  the  competent  hands 
of  his  brother-in-law  Dr.  Robert  E.  Moran,  nationally  known  surgeon 
of  Washington. 

XXXXXXXXX 
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7/2/47 


BRITISH  COMMONWEALTH  CIRCUITS  ARGUMENT  SET  FOR  AUGUST  8 


The  Federal  Communications  Commission  last  Saturday  announ¬ 
ced  adoption  of  a  proposed  report  with  respect  to  certain  applica¬ 
tions  for  direct  radiotelegraph  circuits  between  the  United  States 
and  various  places  in  the  British  Commonwealth  that  were  filed  sub¬ 
sequent  to  the  Bermuda  Telecommunications  Agreement  of  December  1945, 

Oral  argument  on  the  proposed  report  is  scheduled  to  be 
held  before  the  Commission  en  banc  on  August  8th, 

The  report  proposes  to  grant  RCA  Communications,  Inc. , 
authority  to  operate  circuits  on  a  regular  basis  with  Australia, 

New  Zealand,  India,  Greece,  Palestine  and  the  Union  of  South  Africa. 
Mackay  Radio  and  Telegraph  Co.  would  be  authorized  to  serve  Saudi 
Arabia;  and  Tropical  Radio  and  Telegraph  Co. ,  to  serve  Jamaica. 

Applications  of  RCAC  and  Mackay  to  communicate  with  Ceylon, 
Hong  Kong  and  the  Malay  States  (Singapore),  and  the  application  of 
Press  Wireless,  Inc.,  to  operate  a  press  circuit  with  Australia, 
would  be  dismissed  without  prejudice,  since  there  has  been  no  indi¬ 
cation  of  British  readiness  to  open  these  circuits. 

In  the  Bermuda  Telecommunications  Agreement  the  United 
States  and  British  Commonwealth  governments  provided  for  the  opera¬ 
tion  of  direct  radiotelegraph  circuits  between  the  United  States  and 
each  of  the  above-mentioned  points,  subject,  in  some  cases,  to  the 
results  of  traffic  studies.  Public  hearings  on  the  resultant  appli¬ 
cations  were  held  by  the  Commission  in  Aoril  and  August  of  1946. 

Chairman  Denny  and  Commissioner  Jett  dissented  from  the 
conclusions  in  the  proposed  report  with  respect  to  granting  circuits 
to  RCAC  and  Mackay,  expressing  views  to  the  effect  that  there  should 
be  more  of  a  distribution  of  the  circuits  as  between  RCAC  and  Mackay. 
Commissioner  Webster  did  not  participate. 

XXXXXXXX 

RALPH  ATLASS  APPLIES  FOR  $  200,000  TV  STATION  FOR  CHICAGO 

Keeping  right  up  with  the  procession  -  as  he  has  always 
done  since  the  days  Ralph  and  his  brother  Les  began  with  a  small 
transmitter  kept  in  a  family  bureau  drawer  which  developed  into 
WB3M  -  Ralph  L.  Atlas s  has  put  in  with  the  Federal  Communications 
Commission  an  application  for  a  new  television  station  for  WIND  of 
Chicago,  of  which  he  is  president  and  principal  owner. 

Mr.  Atlas s  has  requested  channel  #2  and  puts  the  installa¬ 
tion  costs  at  approximately  $211,000  with  monthly  operating  cost 
figured  at  $13,000  and  monthly  revenues  $7,000.  When  this  applica¬ 
tion  is  granted,  WIND  will  have  the  fifth  television  station  in 
Chicago. 

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7/ S/47 


NAB  CHANGES  NETWORK  MEMBERSHIP  FROM  ACTIVE  TO  ASSOCIATE 


By  a  referendum  vote  of  629  to  28,  the  membership  of  the 
National  Association  of  Broadcasters  yesterday  (July  1),  approved  a 
change  of  network  status  in  the  Association  permitting  radio  chains 
to  hold  associate,  rather  than  active,  membership  in  the  industry 
organization.  With  the  change,  effective  July  1,  the  four  national 
networks  hold  simultaneous  membership  in  the  Association  for  the 
first  time. 


An  immediate  effect  of  the  new  by-law  is  the  retirement 
from  the  Board  of  Frank  M.  Russell,  Vice-President,  NBC,  who  has 
served  as  a  Director  for  17  years,  Frank  Stanton,  President,  CBS 
and  Edgar  Kobak,  President  MBS,  who  has  been  sitting  with  the  Board 
as  an  observer. 

While  the  Association's  new  rules  do  not  permit  networks 
to  have  permanent  Board  representation,  network  officials  may  be 
invited  to  sit  as  observers  from  time  to  time.  The  new  by-law  does 
not  obviate  the  possibility  of  a  network  employee  being  elected  to 
serve  as  a  district  director,  or  a  director-at-large,  through  elec¬ 
tion  while  standing  as  a  candidate  representing  a  network-owned 
station. 


xxxxxxxxx 

SIX  COMPANIES  OPPOSE  PRESS  WIRELESS 

The  application  of  Press  Wireless  for  permission  to  trans¬ 
mit  deferred  commercial  messages  among  the  services  it  is  presently 
licensed  to  render  its  clients,  was  opposed  at  Tuesday’s  concluding 
hearing  before  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  by  six  other 
carriers  as  an  unjustified  invasion  of  their  r espe ctive  fields  of 
activity. 


The  opposition  based  its  protest  on  the  ground  that  press 
Wireless  was  organized  specifically  for  the  handling  of  press  traffic, 
and  should  not  now  seek  amendment  of  its  license  to  enable  it  to 
include  services  which  the  commercial  companies  hitherto  and  pre¬ 
sently  are  equipped  satisfactorily  to  render  alike  to  press  and  pub¬ 
lic.  Representatives  of  Western  Union,  RCA  Communications,  the 
Commercial  Pacif  Cable  Company,  All  America  Cables  and  Radio,  the 
Commercial  Cable  Company  and  Mackay,  appeared  as  intervenors  in  the 
proceedings  in  opposition  to  favorable  action  by  the  Commission  on 
the  pending  application. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

Nina  Lunn,  23-year  old  granddaughter  of  Senator  Wallace  H. 
White,  Jr.,  of  Maine,  Republican  leader  and  Chairman  of  the  Senate 
Interstate  Commerce  Committee,  is  settling  down  in  Hollywood  for  a 
film  career.  Pretty  Miss  Lunn,  who  was  the  center  of  many  Washington, 
D.  C.  party  groups  last  Winter,  already  has  been  signed  for  her  first 
role  in  the  movies. 

XXXXXXXXX 

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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/2/47 


CONGRESSIONAL  INQUIRY  DEMANDS  PETRILLO  APPEAR  JULY  7 


For  what  his  enemies  say  amounts  to  being  called  into  the 
woodshed  for  a  Congressional  spanking,  but  what,  in  any  case,  is  sure 
to  be  a  lively  and  interesting  appearance  even  without  music,  is 
the  scheduled  appearance  of  James  C.  Petrillo,  President  of  the 
American  Federation  of  Musicians  next  Monday  before  the  House  Labor 
sub-committed. 

In  disclosing  this,  Representative  Fred  A.  Hartley,  (r),  of 
New  Jersey,  Chairman  of  the  full  Labor  Committee,  said  the  subpoena 
was  issued  on  April  11  and  was  based  on  "numerous  complaints  which 
had  been  made  concerning  the  unfair  practices  of  Mr.  Petrillo  and  the 
American  Federation  of  Musicians.  ” 

In  the  meantime,  the  Washington  Post  carried  the  following 
editorial  suggesting  that  the  so-called  anti -petrillo  Act  Just 
declared  constitutional  by  the  U.  S.  Supreme  Court,  should  be  repeal¬ 
ed. 

"The  Supreme  Court* s  favorable  view  of  the  so-called  Anti- 
Petrillo  Act  loses  some  of  its  signifies ce  because  of  what  happened 
on  the  Senate  floor  about  the  time  this  decision  was  being  handed 
down.  When  this  case  was  dealt  with  by  Federal  District  Court,  we 
felt  that  James  C.  Petrillo  had  made  a  formidable  assault  upon  the 
validity  of  the  act  directed  against  his  featherbedding  practices. 
Congress  had  singled  out  broadcasting  employees  for  a  special  type 
of  regulation.  It  put  a  penalty  upon  the  use  of  force  or  duress  to 
compel  the  hiring  of  more  employees  than  are  needed  to  perform  actual 
services.  Put  the  la?/  was  limited  in  its  application  to  broadcasting 
employees.  We  felt  that  this  was  an  unreasonable  and  discriminatory 
policy  which  should  not  be  permitted  to  stand. 

"A  majority  of  the  Judges  on  the  Supreme  Bench,  however, 
found  no  constitutional  weakness  in  the  act  on  its  face,  *  It  is 
not  within  our  province  to  say",  wrote  Justice  Black  for  a  majority 
of  five,  ’that  because  Congress  has  prohibited  some  practices  within 
its  power  to  prohibit,  it  must  prohibit  all  within  its  power.1  The 
three  dissenting  justices  thought  the  Anti-Petrillo  Act  too  vague  to 
meet  the  requirements  of  !due  process’.  The  significant  fact  is  that 
Congress  took  note  of  both  the  weaknesses  that  have  troubled  some 
Judges  -  vagueness  and  discrimination  -  when  it  gave  the  Taft-Hartley 
Act  final  shape.  That  act  makes  it  an  unfair  labor  practice  for  a 
union  *  to  cause  or  attempt  to  cause  an  employer  to  pay  or  deliver  .  . 
any  money  or  other  thing  of  value,  in  the  nature  of  an  exaction,  for 
services  which  are  not  performed  or  not  to  be  performed.  ’ 

"All  unions  in  interstate  industries  are  now  subject  to 
this  restriction,  and  it  seems  to  us  that  all  doubt  as  to  its  mean¬ 
ing  is  removed.  There  is  no  point  now  in  keeping  on  the  statute 
books  the  vague  and  particularistic  Anti-Petrillo  Act,  which  was 
really  designed  to  curb  the  activities  of  only  one  person.  We  think 
it  should  be  repealed.  rt 

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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


7/2/47 


SEN.  WHITE  THROWSUP  SPONGE  FOR  RADIO  BILL 


Senator  Wallace  White  (r),  of  Maine,  in  a  surprise  move 
last  week  suggested  that  the  White-Wolverton  Radio  Bill  to  reorgan¬ 
ize  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  and  revamp  the  radio  laws 
be  shelved  for  this  session.  Up  to  then  every  effort  had  been  made 
to  have  it  passed  before  Senator  White  retires  next  year. 

Senator  White* s  statement  follows: 

nDue  to  the  press  of  other  legislative  matters  and  the 
fact  that  the  hearings  on  the  bill  ran  longer  than  expected,  I  do 
not  now  feel  that  the  Committee  should  attempt  t o  report  the  bill 
before  the  Congressional  recess,  expected  about  July  26th. 

"I  believe  that  the  hearings  just  concluded  served  a  very 
useful  purpose.  They  highlighted  the  amazing  technical  and  other 
developments  in  the  communications  field,  as  well  as  the  extreme 
divergence  of  views  in  the  industry  itself  concerning  many  basic 
problems.  These  problems  and  the  many  criticisms  and  helpful  sug¬ 
gestions  offered  deserve  and  will  receive  prompt,  as  well  as  careful 
consideration  by  members  of  the  Committee,  by  the  Committee  itself 
and  in  due  course  by  the  Congress.  11 

XXXXXXXX 

MERLE  JONES  RETURNS  TO  CBS  AS  GENERAL  MANAGER  OF  WCCO 

Merle  Jones,  veteran  radio  executive,  has  returned  to 
the  Columbia  Broadcasting  System  as  General  Manager  of  WCCO,  the 
network-owned  station  in  Minneapolis- St.  Paul. 

Mr.  Jones  began  his  new  duties  Monday  by  meeting  old  friends 
and  getting  acquainted  with  the  station  personnel.  The  post  has  been 
vacant  for  the  past  two  months  since  A.  E.  Joscelyn  submitted  his 
resignation  to  embark  on  a  career  in  another  industry. 

Mr.  Jones,  who  was  bom  in  Omaha  in  1905,  was  with  C3S  for 
eight  years  until  October,  1944,  when  he  resigned  as  General  Manager 
of  KMOX,  Columbia- owned  station  in  St.  Louis  to  become  Vice-President 
and  General  Manager  of  WOL  (Cowles  Broadcasting  Company  outlet)  in 
Washington,  D.  C.  He  resigned  from  that  position  about  seven  weeks 
ago. 


He  is  Chairman  of  the  Program  Executive  Committee  of  the 
National  Association  of  Broadcasters,  a  member  of  the  NAB  Standards 
of  Practice  Committee  and  a  member  of  the  Broadcast  Committee  of  the 
Advisory  Board  to  the  Bureau  of  the  Budget.  The  last-named  unit  has 
just  completed  an  important  phase  of  its  work  which  concerns  recom¬ 
mendations  for  simplifying  and  revising  Federal  Communications  Com¬ 
mission  forms  and  questionnaires  used  by  broadcasters, 

XXXXXXXX 


-  10  - 


•  .  .  ;  V..  /  ' 


He i nl  Ra dio  News  Service 


7/2/47 


SURPLUS  W ALKIE  TALKIES  CAN’T  BE  USED  FOR  CITIZENS  RADIO 


It  will  no  doubt  come  as  a  blow  to  many  that  war  surplus 
’’walkie-talkies ”  will  not  operate  in  the  bend  which  the  Federal 
Communications  Commission  has  designated  for  the  use  of  the  new 
’’Citizens  Radio  Service”  (person-to-person  communication).  This 
military  equipment  was  designed  for  particular  frequencies  which 
could  be  used  overseas  but  which,  if  employed  in  this  country,  would 
Interfere  with  marine,  police,  fire  and  other  radio  services.  It  is 
impracticable  to  convert  this  apparatus,  since  an  uneconomic  degree 
of  rebuilding  would  be  involved. 

Due  to  these  and  other  considerations,  it  is  illegal  for 
an  unauthorized  individual  to  attempt  to  use  surplus  radio  trans¬ 
mitting  equipment.  Under  the  Communications  Act,  no  person  may 
operate  a  radio  transmitter  without  first  obtaining  a  license  from 
the  Commission.  Violators  are  subject  to  possible  fine  or  imprison¬ 
ment,  or  both.  And  the  Commission’s  monitoring  stations  are  quick 
to  detect  unlawful  transmission. 

As  in  the  case  with  all  types  of  radio  operation,  author¬ 
ization  will  be  necessary.  In  the  case  of  the  Citizens  Radio  Service, 
the  Commission  contemplates  a  simple  procedure  requiring  no  techni¬ 
cal  knowledge  by  the  prospective  user. 

The  day  when  individuals  will  be  able  to  use  small  radio 
receiver-transmitters  for  private  purposes  moved  a  step  nearer  real¬ 
ity  today  when  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  proposed  tech¬ 
nical  requirements  and  procedure  for  obtaining  type  approval  of 
equipment  to  be  used  in  this  contemplated  new  service. 

In  its  frequency  allocations  report  of  May  25,  1945,  the 
Commission  set  apart  the  band  of  460-470  megacycles  for  this  purpose. 
Subsequently,  and  in  cooperation  with  manufacturers  and  others  in¬ 
terested,  the  Commission’s  engineering  staff  worked  out  technical 
standards  for  the  equipment  to  be  employed.  Every  effort  has  been 
made  to  keep  these  requirements  to  a  minimum  consistent  with  the  need 
for  apparatus  that  is  reasonably  low  in  price  and  whose  operation 
will  not  require  technical  skill,  yet  will  permit  the  widest  possible 
use  with  the  least  amount  of  interference  to  other  radio  operations. 

The  proposed  Citizens  Radio  Service  will  provide  an  opport¬ 
unity  for  adapting  short-range  radiocommunication  equipment,  includ¬ 
ing  some  of  the  pocket-size  sets  now  under  development,  to  varied 
personal  needs.  The  possiti  lities  for  utilizing  this  type  of  radio 
are  unlimited.  It  can  provide  contact  in  isolated  places,  such  as 
ranches,  farms,  and  industrial  property;  it  can  serve  doctors,  sur¬ 
veyors,  hunters,  fishermen  and  many  others.  Private  boats  and 
vehicles  will  be  able  to  use  it,  possibly  even  connecting  with  tele¬ 
phone  systems.  At  the  same  time,  individual  sending-and- receiving 
sets  will  augment  communication  facilities  in  time  of  accident  or 
disaster.  Pending  the  establishment  of  the  Citizens  Radio  Service, 
no  licenses  are  being  issued  to  the  general  public  except  on  an 
experimental  basis. 

XXXXXXXXX 

-  11  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/2/47 


FORT  INDUSTRY  ENTERS  DETROIT  THROUGH  WJBK  IN  $700,000  DEAL 


The  Fort  Industry  Company  of  which  George  B.  Store r  is 
president,  and  Harold  Ryan,  Vice-President,  has  again  consolidated 
its  steady  gains  by  securing  approval  of  the  Federal  Communications 
Commission  for  the  purchase  of  Station  WJBK,  Detroit,  for  $698,  285. 

At  the  same  time,  the  company,  under  an  agreement  with 
the  Commission,  sold  WHIZ,  Zanesville,  for  $272,500.  Thus  the  number 
of  stations o wned  by  the  Fort  Industry  still  rfemains  at  seven. 

The  deal  which  saw  250-watter  WJBK  change  hands  is  report¬ 
ed  a  record  sales  ticket  for  a  local  channel  station.  The  nearest 
approach  was  the  $50  0,000  fee  paid  by  the  Washington  Post  for  WlN3t, 
Washington,  in  1944. 

xxxxxxxxxx 

CBS  SUED  FOR  $250,000 

The  Columbia  Broadcasting  System  was  named  defendant 
last  week  in  a  $250,000  damage  action  brought  in  Supreme  Court  by 
Donald  Q,  Coster,  former  Army  Colonel,  who  alleged  that  he  had  been 
held  up  to  ridicule  in  a  radio  program  broadcast  last  February  27th, 
called  nDakar  Cover  plan”,  in  which,  he  alleges,  the  public  was  led 
to  believe  that  he  was  either  the  author  of  the  story  or  had  approv¬ 
ed  it. 


In  his  complaint  Mr.  Coster  said  he  was  impersonated  by  a 
radio  actor  and  the  "plaintiff  was  thus  made  out  and  represented  in 
and  by  said  program  as  a  liar,  a  braggart  and  fool  and  help  up  to 
public  ridicule,  s  corn  and  contempt.  " 

XXXXXXXXX 

RCA  OPENS  RADIO- TELEGRAPH  CIRCUIT  TO  GREECE 

The  first  direct  radio-telegraph  circuit  between  the 
United  States  and  Greece  was  opened  yesterday  (July  1),  by  RCA  Com¬ 
munications,  Inc. ,  Thompson  H.  Mitchell,  Executive  Vice-president, 
has  announced. 

The  new  circuit  eliminates  the  London  relay  to  which  mes¬ 
sages  had  been  subjected.  The  Athens  terminal  of  the  service  will 
be  operated  by  Cable  &  Wireless,  Ltd. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


12  - 


r 


* 


Helnl  i&dio  News  Service 


7/2/47 


##* 


*## 


***  SCISSORS  AND  PASTE  *** 

*** 


Credits  Leonard  Reinsch  With  Improving  Truman' ^Broadcasts 

(  Drew  Pearson  in  ^Washington  Post **) 

Credit  White  House  Radio  Adviser  J.  Leonard  Reinsch  with 
the  big  improvement  in  president  Truman’s  radio  voice.  After  long 
and  patient  study  Reinsch  found  that  the  trouble  with  Truman’s  radio 
personality  was  that  he  talked  too  fast.  Reinsch  experimented  with 
a  number  of  gadgets,  including  a  moving  tape,  before  he  clicked  with 
the  present  successful  formula. 

Now  Reinsch  has  Truman' s  speeches  typed  in  large  letters 
with  only  one  sentence  to  a  page.  He  has  also  convinced  Mr.  Truman 
that  no  station  would  ever  cut  the  president  of  the  United  States 
off  the  air,  no  matter  how  slow  his  speech,  end  that  he  can  take  all 
the  time  he  wants.  Result;  Truman  now  emphasizes  every  phrase, 
speaks  easily,  rarely  stumbles. 


Television  And  Liquor  Consumption 

( Chicago  He  raid- Arne  rican  ) 

Have  television  sets  in  saloons  increased  liquor  consump¬ 
tion?  "Yes”,  says  Bruce  Brown,  Vice-President  of  Standard  Oil  Co. 

’’No",  asserts  Commander  Eugene  F.  McDonald,  Jr.,  President 
of  Zenith  Radio  Corp. 

Day  or  two  ago  we  quoted  Brown  as  saying  :  ”A  baseball 
fan  can  now  while  away  a  whole  afternoon  in  a  saloon  while  he  watches 
his  favorite  ball  team  play  .  .  .  more  booze  and  less  fresh  air 
while  watching  the  same  old  ball  game.  " 

Which  brought  this  rejoinder  from  McDonald:  ’’Remember 
when  Jimmy  Roosevelt  came  out  with  talkie  films?  The  project  flop¬ 
ped  absolutely  because  tavemkeepers  learned  that  people  do  not  con¬ 
sume  liquor  when  they’re  watching  movies  as  they  do  when  listening 
to  music. " 

What  is  coming  into  the  ear  does  not  slow  up  consumption, 
avers  McDonald,  but  eyes  riveted  on  a  screen  halt  elbow- crooking. 

How  about  it? 


An  Old  Story  In  A  New  Setting 
(Leonard  Lyons  in  "Washington  Post”) 

Broadway’s  first  television  casualty  was  caused  by  the 
repeated  close-ups  of  a  left-field  box  at  a  ball  game,  where  a 
glamorous  screen  star  was  sitting  with  her  manager.  He  had  told 
his  wife  that  he  was  going  to  Westchester  for  a  business  engagement 
and  forgot  that  they  have  a  television  set  at  home. 


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7/2/47 


Patch  give  Some  Tips  On  How  To  Improve  Broadcasts 

(philips  Technical  Review) 

A  recent  issue  (Volume  9,  Nunb  er  2  )  of  Philips  Technic^. 
Review,  published  by  philips  Laboratories  in  Holland,  contains  an 
article,  ’’Installations  for  Improved  Broadcast  Reception”  by 
p.  Cornelius  and  J.  Van  Slooton,  an  extract  of  which  follows: 

Thanks  to  the  fact  that  fading  e  ffect  seldom  occurs  at 
different  places  simultaneously,  its  unpleasant  consequences  can  be 
successfully  counteracted  by  setting  up  receivers  some  distance 
apart  (diversity  reception)  and  connecting  to  the  loudspeaker( s) 
only  that  one  where  the  reception  happens  to  be  best  at  the  moment. 
An  apparatus  has  been  worked  out  which  brings  this  about  automatic¬ 
ally.  In  practice  it  appears  that  three  receiving  stations  about 
1  km  apart  are  sufficient. 

Interferences  from  other  transmitters  can  be  counteracted 
by  applying  directional  reception  with  the  aid  of  a  frame  aerial, 
preferably  in  combination  with  a  normal  antenna.  Thanks  to  the 
freedom  from  disturbances  thereby  attainable,  the  bandwidth  of  the 
receiving  set  can  readily  be  increased,  thus  improving  the  quality 
of  the  sound.  Diversity  reception  and  directional  reception  can 
easily  be  combined.  The  former,  however,  can  only  be  considered  for 
installations  serving  a  large  number  of  listeners. 

Copies  of  the  Technical  Review  may  be  had  upon  application 
to  the  North  American  philips  Co.,  100  East  4  2nd  Street,  New  York!?, 
New  York. 


Senator  White  Hands  It  Right  Back 

(Senator  Alexander  Wherry  (r),  of  Wisconsin  in  an 
article  ”Congress  Has  Its  Fun”  in  New  York  Times) 

Republican- Democratic  parrying  has  produced  some  humor. 

Here  is  a  brief  exchange  between  Senator  Barkley  and  Senator  Wallace 
H.  W  hite,  of  Maine,  co-author  of  the  new  White- Wolverton  Radio  Bill. 
It  occurred  after  the  GOP  leader  had  issued  some  words  in  praise  of 
cne  of  his  opponent’s  activities. 

Mr.  Barkley:  I  thank  the  Senator  from  Maine,  This  epi¬ 
sode  gives  me  hope  and  encouragement  to  believe  that  hereafter  the 
Senators  from  Maine  may  have  many  occasions  to  endorse  something 
done  by  a  Democratic  administration. 

Mr.  White :  I  do  not  expect  to  be  overworked;  but  I  shall 
try  to  meet  my  obligations  in  that  respect, 

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He  ini  Radio  News  Service 


7/2/47 


TRADE  NOTES 


Frank  E.  Mason,  well-known  to  the  broadcasting  industry, 
has  been  appointed  Executive  Director  of  the  United  Brewers  Associa¬ 
tion.  He  was  Vice-President  of  the  National  Broadcasting  Company 
for  fourteen  years  and  prior  to  that  was  President  of  the  Interna¬ 
tional  News  Service.  Last  year  he  traveled  with  former  President 
Herbert  Hoover  to  thirty-eight  countries  to  study  the  world  food 
situation. 

After  service  in  World  War  I,  Mr.  Mason  was  Chief  of  the 
Berlin  office  of  the  International  News  Service.  IXiring  World  War 
II,  he  was  Special  Assistant  to  the  late  Secretary  of  the  Navy  Frank 
Knox. 


Chairman  Denny  of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission 
asserted  last  week  a  House  cut  of  $1,300,000  in  proposed  funds  for 
the  agency  will  hamper  the  development  of  television  next  year. 


Telecasting  on  a  regularly  scheduled  program  basis  is 
being  planned  by  Westinghouse  in  Boston  early  next  year.  Inaugura^ 
tion  of  test  pattern  and  other  experimental  transmission  is  schedul¬ 
ed  later  this  year,  it  was  reported. 


ment : 


New  York  newspapers  are  carrying  the  followind  advertise- 


"United  States  Television  Manufacturing  Corp.  presents 
the  Tele- Symphonic  with  pictures  2  f  eet  x  1-|-  feet. ...  Fully  as  big  as 
this  entire  newspaper  page’ 

,rAlso  a  tavern  set  with  world’s  largest  screen  and  a  10- 
inch  home  console  with  radio  and  phonograph. 

"See  Your  Dealer.  rt 


The  Honduran  Ministry  of  Development,  Agriculture  and  Labor 
has  extended  the  contract  between  the  Tropical  Radio  Telegraph  Co. 
and  the  Honduran  Government  for  an  additional  SO  years  from  its 
present  expiration  date  in  1951. 


Installation  of  the  new  1,850  megacycle  relay  equipment 
recently  acquired  by  television  station  WBKB  in  Chicago  as  part  of 
its  experimental  radio  relay  link  to  Michigan  City  and  South  Bend, 
Indiana,  has  begun,  according  to  the  TV  Association  News  Letter.  One 
tower  at  Michigan  City  is  already  in  place  and  another  is  under  con¬ 
struction  at  New  Carlisle,  Ind, 

Opening  of  the  LaPorte  Ccunty  Fair  in  July  is  expected  to 
be  the  first  show  aired  via  the  relay. 

All  remaining  home  games  of  the  Washington  Senators,  both 
day  and  night,  will  be  televised  by  DuMont’s  Washington,  D.  C, 

Station  WTTG-.  Under  the  sponsorship  of  Lacy’s,  electrical  appli¬ 
ance  dealers  in  the  Capital,  the  games  will  mark  the  first  special- 
events  series  to  be  sponsored  in  Washington. 


15  - 


•ii ... 


a 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/2/4? 


John  Ballantyne,  President  of  philco  Corporation,  announc¬ 
ed  last  Sunday  that  the  Corporation's  Storage  Battery  Division  has 
been  acquired  and  is  to  be  operated  by  the  National  Battery  Company 
as  a  consolidation  with  its  Gould  Storage  Battery  Corporation  for 
the  manufacture  and  sale  of  Industrial  Storage  Batteries. 

The  Gould  Company  will  assume  warranty  and  service  res¬ 
ponsibility  for  all  Philco  Storage  Batteries  now  in  use  and  will 
have  the  right  to  continue  manufacture  and  sale  of  Philco  storage 
batteries  during  the  transition  period. 


Local  amateur  radio  operators  at  a  picnic  of  the  Washing¬ 
ton  D.  C.  Radio  Club  last  week  spent  considerable  time  trying  to 
locate  a  hidden  radio  transmitter  with  their  mobile  radio  car 
equipped  with  a  rotating  antenna. 

Lieut.  Commander  James  M.  Tippey,  W3MNA  won  the  hidden 
transmitter  contest  with  Mrs.  Fred  Kennedy,  W3MGM  second. 


A  powerful  marine  coastal  radiotelegraph  station  has  been 
opened  for  commercial  use  at  the  Port  of  Galveston,  Texas,  by  the 
Marine  Division  of  Mackay  Radio  and  Telegraph  Company.  Operating  on 
the  call  letters  KLC,  the  new  station  is  tentatively  on  intermediate 
frequencies  with  a  power  output  of  5,000  watts.  It  is  scheduled  for 
high  frequency  operation  pending  the  necessary  authorization  by  the 
Federal  Communications  Commission. 

It  is  Mackay* s  first  station  in  the  Gulf  area  and  follows 
closely  the  announcement  of  the  opening  of  a  similar  station  at 
Kent,  Washington,  near  Seattle.  The  tenth  station  in  the  company* s 
coastal  station  network  will  be  placed  in  operation  shortly  in  the 
Hawaiian  Islands. 


At  a  dealer  meeting  in  New  York  the  Sparks  Withington 
Company,  producers  of  Sparton  radios,  introduced  six  new  table  models 
sets  retailing  from  $19.95  to  $79.  95.  The  top  model  is  the  only 
radio-phonograph  combination.  Three  console  models  in  various  types 
of  cabinet  woods  also  were  introduced.  All  are  radio-phonograph 
combinations,  with  both  AM  and  FM  facilities,  and  retail  for  $229.95. 
The  entire  new  line  will  be  in  the  hands  of  Vim,  Hearn* s,  Macy*s  and 
Bloomingdale *  s,  New  York  dealers,  within  ten  days,  it  was  said. 

Philadelphia  radio  dealers  and  FM  broadcasters  are  prepared 
to  open  up  a  new  market  for  FM  radios  following  the  introduction  of 
which  is  described  as  peacetime  radio's  top-drawer  secret,  the  Bendix 
Radio  FactoMeter. 

"The  FactoMeter  is  an  AM-5M  set  that  is  portable  to  any 
light  socket",  said  J,  T.  Dalton,  Bendix  Radio  Sales  Manager.  "It 
is  equipped  with  a  small,  telescopic  antenna  and  a  precision  meter 
which  accurately  translates  the  strength  of  incoming  signals  on  the 
antenna. 

"Since  the  very  short  waves  of  FM  are  only  about  ten  feet 
long,  as  compared  with  the  thousand  foot  wave  length  of  standard 
broadcast,  variations  may  occur  within  five  feet.  Thus,  in  the  aver¬ 
age  living  room  there  are  apt  to  b e  several  spots  where  FM  reception 
is  dead.  At  the  same  time,  there  are  apt  to  be  several  that  are 
noticeably  high.  This  is  determined  by  watching  the  meter  as  the 
operator  explores  the  room  with  the  FactoMeter. " 

Cost  of  Cacto-Meter  is  $124.95. 

XXXXXXXXXX  -16- 


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Founded  in  1924 


HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 


Radio  —  Television  —  FM  — 

Communications 

2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 

Washington  8,  D.  C. 

Robert  D.  Heinl,  Editor 

JUL  10  1947 

INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  JULY  9,  1947 

HUE  IRAWMEL* 

••phone  Vision  Sets  To  Ee  Sold  In  Millions’',  G-ene  McDonald, . 1 

"Voice  Of  America"  Finally  Gets  By  But  That  Is  About  All..... . 3 

WTOP  Explains  Advertisement  Which  Riled  Kate  Smith . 4 

Santa  Fe  Train  Radio  Last  Word  For  Passenger  Pleasure . 5 

Radio  Set  Exports  Soar;  Probably  $60, 000,000  This  Year . 6 

Relief  From  Diathermy  Radio  Interference  Believed  In  Sight.,. . 6 


Okehing  Of  Rep.  Jones  Fbr  FCC  Predicted  On  Capitol  Hill..., . ,7 


WATL,  Atlanta,  Upheld  By  NLRB  In  Advising  Employee . . . 8 

Petrillo  Plays  Washington  For  Two  Days  To  Capacity  Audiences . 9 

BBC  Now  Using  50  Transmitters..... . .10 

Federal  Radio  Labor  Slowdown  Causes  I.  T,  &  T.  Loss...... . 11 

Antony  Wright  Is  New  Chief  Engineer  At  U.  S.  Television... . 11 

Pannill  Retires  As  President  Of  Radiomarine . .  11 

A  Humorist  Kids  FIJI. . . . . . . 12 

Scissors  And  Paste. . . . . . . 13 


Trade  Notes. . . . . . . . 

Petrillo  Only  A  Newspaper  Build  Up,  Canadians  Told. . . 

Senator  Asks  How  Washington,  D.  C.  Daylight  Time  Is  Working, 


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He ini  Radio  News  Service 


July  9,  1947 


"PHONE  VISION  SETS  TO  PE  SOLD  IN  MILLIONS",  GENE  McDONALD 


One  of  the  most  interesting  things  in  connection  with 
E.  F.  McDonald,  Jr.,  President  of  the  Zenith  Radio  Corporation, 
predicting  last  week  the  coming  of  "phone- Vision"  (television  for 
which  you  pay  as  you  listen  over  the  telephone)  was  a  letter  which 
it  has  been  learned  he  sent  to  all  of  his  competitors  not  only 
assuring  them  of  his  confidence  in  the  development  which  he  believ¬ 
ed  would  sweep  the  country  but  Inviting  them  or  their  engineers  to 
come  to  Chicago  to  have  a  look  for  themselves.  Commander  McDonald 
said  that  although  "phone  Vision"  is  a  development  of  his  company, 
licenses  will  be  granted  to  all  qualified  manufacturers  who  apply. 

McDonald’s  joining  the  television  ranks  came  as  all  the 
more  of  a  surprise  because  up  to  now,  while  agreeing  that  television 
was  technically  acceptable,  he  has  maintained  it  was  economically 
unsound. 


wrote : 


In  the  letter  to  his  colleagues,  the  Chicago  manufacturer 


"On  September  24,  1931,  I  addresse da  meeting  of  the  Radio 
Manufacturers’  Association  and  stated  that,  in  my  opinion,  the 
advertisers  never  could  pay  for  the  type  of  programs  necessary  to 
make  television  sets  sell  in  the  millions.  I  further  stated  that 
there  was  nothing  wrong  with  television  that  money  would  not  cure, 
and  that  I  believed  that  some  method  would  be  found  to  use  the  tele¬ 
phone  wires  for  television.  I  confirmed  this  in  a  letter  that  I 
sent  shortly  thereafter  to  J.  M.  Skinner,  then  president  of  the 
Philadelphia  Storage  Battery  Company.*  *  *  * 

"Now  comes  Phone  Vision  which,  I  believe,  is  the  best 
method  of  supplying  the  box-office  necessary  to  enable  the  industry 
to  present  programs  of  high  calibre,  including  the  latest  feature 
movies  and  newsreels.  This  will  cause  television  receivers  to  be 
sold  in  the  millions. 

"Incidentally,  phone  Vision  is  composed  of  two  descript¬ 
ive,  generic  words  which  cannot  be  copyrighted  or  trade  marked  by 
us  or  any  other  interest  in  the  industry.  The  name  belongs  to  the 
industry  just  as  does  ’radio’,  ’television',  and  ’phonograph'. 

"phone  Vision  works  equally  well  with  color  television, 
projection  receivers,  or  black  and  white.  It  operates  by  sending  a 
’key’  signal  over  either  a  telephone  or  electric  power  line.  With¬ 
out  this  key  signal  the  picture  on  the  screen  is  a  hopeless  blur.  " 

"Phone  Vision"  has  been  pretty  well  explained  by  lengthy 
press  association  dispatches  but  more  details  are  given  in  an 
article  "Television  Gets  A  Box  Office"  by  Herbert  Asbury  in  the 
current  issue  of  Collier' s  (July  12).  Mr.  Asbury  writes: 

-  1  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/9/4? 


"The  television  set  was  in  a  suburban  basement  some  ten 
miles  from  Chicago*  and  on  the  screen  was  a  moving  picture  that  was 
being  broadcast  by  one  of  the  two  experimental  television  trans¬ 
mitters  of  the  Zenith  Radio  Corporation.  But  the  picture  was  blur¬ 
red  and  jumpy;  it  would  have  been  Impossible  to  look  at  it  long 
without  eyestrain. 

"After  a  few  minutes  G.  E.  Gustafson,  a  Zenith  executive, 
picked  up  the  telephone  and  called  the  transmitting  station. 

"'Send  the  key1,  Mr.  Gustafson  ordered. 

"Instantly  the  screen  steadied  and  the  picture  became 
clear  and  sharp, 

"'Stop  the  key',  said  Mr.  Gustafson,  and  the  picture  again 
became  a  meaningless  blur.  He  repeated  the  procedure  several  times. 
When  he  said,  'Send  the  key',  the  picture  was  clear  and  satisfactory; 
when  he  said,  'Stop  the  key',  the  screen  Jumped  and  blurred.*  *  *  * 

"Once  wired  television  is  ready,  this  is  about  the  way  it 

will  work: 


"You  will  buy  a  television  set  from  your  dealer,  who  will 
install  it.  Then  the  telephone  company  will  attach  the  device  that 
connects  the  set  with  your  telephone  and  permits  you  to  receive  the 
key  frequency,  or  ' unscrambler’ . 

"At  regular  intervals,  say  once  a  week,  you  will  receive 
an  announcement  of  forthcoming  programs  and  the  charge  for  seeing 
each.  You  will  select  the  program  you  wish  to  see  and  notify  the 
telephone  operator,  who  will  connect  your  phone  so  the  key  frequency 
can  come  in  over  the  wire.  If  you  have  a  diel  phone,  it  probably 
will  be  possible  simply  to  dial  a  number  in  order  to  get  the  program 
you  want,  party  lines  will  have  a  different  key  frequency  for  each 
subscriber. 

"Once  the  telephone  operator  has  been  notified,  the  broad¬ 
cast  will  be  received  on  your  set  in  the  usual  manner,  and  charges 
for  television  service  will  appear  on  your  monthly  telephone  bill. 

"It  will  not  be  possible  yet  to  skip  about  on  your  tele¬ 
vision  set  as  you  do  on  the  radio,  seeing  a  little  of  this  program 
and  a  little  of  that.  When  you  order  the  phone  operator  to  connect 
you  with  a  certain  television  broadcast,  you  will  be  osying  admis¬ 
sion.  to  a  show  of  your  own  choosing;  the  difference  is  that  you  will 
see  it  in  the  comfort  of  your  home  rather  than  in  a  theater.  You 
can’t  turn  to  another  show,  without  paying,  any  more  than  you  can 
wa.lk  out  of  one  theater  and  into  another  and  be  admitted  free.*  *  * 

"Ihe  sets  now  in  use  cannot  be  adapted  to  wired  television, 
and  will  become  obsolete;  but,  as  Mr.  McDonald  pointed  out,  they 
will  be  useless  anyway  when  the  Federal  Communications  Commission 
allocates  to  television  a  higher  position  on  the  wave  band,  as  is 
proposed,  and  establishes  standards  now  lacking. " 


2 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/9/47 


At  the  moment  Zenith  operates  the  only  television  station 
in  Chicago  W9X2V.  The  other  station,  owned  by  Balaban  &  Katz  WBKD, 
is  temporarily  closed  for  repairs. 

It  was  a  coincidence  that  almost  at  the  same  time  the 
iPhone  Vision11  story  broke  that  the  New  York  Times  (July  7)  should 
carry  a  picture  from  Moscow  of  a  new  sraaXT  Russian  television  set 
combined  with  a  telephone  showing  the  photograph  of  the  person 
talking  at  the  other  end  of  the  wire. 

xxxxxxxxxxx 

"VOICE  OF  AMERICA"  FINALLY  GETS  3Y  3UT  THAT  IS  A30UT  ALL 

When  the  State  Department  appropriation  bill  finally  reach¬ 
ed  the  White  House,  it  included  $12,400,000  for  the  Department's 
foreign  information  and  cultural  program  which  provides  a  slashed 
budget  for  international  broadcasting,  the  "Voice  of  America"  pro¬ 
grams,  and  only  about  enough  in  addition  to  liquidate  the  Informa¬ 
tion  Department's  other  overseas  activities. 

Of  the  $12, 400,000  allotted  to  overseas  information  activ¬ 
ities,  less  than  half  the  $31,000,000  asked  for  by  secretary  Marshall, 
$6,857,000  was  appropriated  for  broadcasting  the  "Voice  of  America" 
throughout  the  world.  The  bill  provides,  however,  that  all  broad¬ 
casting  except  to  critical  areas  like  Russia,  southeastern  Europe 
and  certain  Far  Eastern  areas,  must  be  turned  over  to  the  private 
broadcasting  networks  within  90  days. 

The  big  networks  insisted  they  did  not  want  this  respons¬ 
ibility,  but  Congress  was  determined  to  get  the  bulk  of  the  broadcast¬ 
ing  out  of  the  State  Department's  hands.  The  networks  are  expected 
to  hire  some  of  the  language  experts  and  announcers  whom  the  State 
Department  has  been  using. 

The  State  Department's  present  broadcasting  organization 
in  New  York  will  be  virtually  scrapped;  the  controls  exercised  in  the 
past  by  a  large  staff  of  "area  specialists"  in  the  department  in 
Washington  will  have  to  be  carried  on  by  a  handful  of  surviving  of¬ 
ficials,  after  arrangements  have  been  made  with  the  networks  for 
transmitting  State  Department  policy  to  them. 

Employees  of  the  International  Broadcasting  Division  of 
which  there  are  400  In  New  York  City,  will  have  three  months'  pay 
provided  to  enable  them  to  look  for  other  Jobs. 

The  Department  expects  to  be  able  to  continue  the  daily 
wireless  bulletin  which  brings  texts  and  other  official  news  to 
embassies  and  legations  throughout  the  world. 

Meanwhile  Gen.  Dwight  D.  Eisenhower  pleaded  before  a 
Senate  Foreign  Relations  Subcommittee  for  approval  of  the  Mundt  bill, 
which  would  authorize  the  State  Department's  continuance  of  informa¬ 
tion  and  cultural  work  abroad  on  a  permanent  basis. 

-  3  - 


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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/9/47 


•’People  who  understand  each  other  do  not  fight",  said  the 
Chief  of  Staff,  arguing  that  the  Mundt  bill  would  play  a  large  part 
in  creating  understanding  and  "preserving  permanent  peace". 

The  General* s  plea  will  not  result  in  more  money  for  the 
information  program  or  the  "Voice  of  America”  at  this  time,  but  the 
subcommittee  asked  State  Department  officials  to  describe  Just  how 
the  slim  fund  of  $12,400,000  will  be  spent. 

Secretary  Marshall  sounded  a  new  warning  to  the  Senate 
that  the  failure  of  Congress  to  act  on  the  Mundt  bill  this  session 
will  place  "serious  handicaps  on  carrying  out  our  foreign  policy". 

Senator  H.  Alexander  Smith  (R),  of  New  Jersey,  Subcommittee 
Chairman,  said  he  believed  the  Committee  would  report  the  bill  and 
get  it  on  the  calendar  this  session,  but  he  indicated  there  was 
little  hope  the  measure  would  get  the  green  light  from  the  Senate 
leadership.  The  measure  has  already  passed  the  House  by  a  three  to 
one  vote. 


XXXXXXXXX 

WTOP  EXPLAINS  ADVERTISEMENT  WHICH  RILED  KATE  SMITH 

In  the  July  5  issue  of  Billboard  Magazine,  there  appeared 
an  account  of  a  broadcast  on  the  Mutual  network  by  Ted  Collins  and 
Kate  Smith  alleging  that  WTOP  was  guilty  of  "one  of  the  dirtiest 
tricks”  in  the  business,  referring  to  publicity  measures  taken  by 
WTOP  announcing  the  Kate  Smith  successor  on  WTOP. 

According  to  Carl  J.  Burkland,  General  Manager  of  WTOP, 
the  Columbia  station  in  Washington  broadcast  apparently  refers  to 
advertising  by  WTOP  about  an  entirely  different  situation  and  was 
printed  eight  months  before  CBS  knew  that  Kate  would  change  to  Mutual 
this  Summer.  Mr.  Burkland  formally  explained  the  matter  as  follows: 

The  copy  of  the  advertisement  which  first  appeared  in 
November  1946  read: 

"When  ’Kate  Smith  Speaks*  moved  from  noon  to  11:00  A.M, 
in  Washington,  D.  C.  during  the  daylight  saving  months,  WTOP  was  put 
on  a  spot.... with  the  job  of  replacing  high  Hooperated  Kate  with  a 
local  origination. 

"We  took  our  cue  from  Kate  Smith.  She  had  delivered  a 
large  quota  of  news  at  noon.  And  listeners  liked  it... The  story  of 
our  * understudy*  for  Kate  Smith  backs  WT0P*s  claim  of  a  special 
skill  in  building  local  programs  for  Washington. ” 

"The  advertising  agency  handling  the  Kate  Smith  account 
approved  the  copy  before  it  was  placed  with  any  magazine.  WTOP  feels 
that  the  advertisement  in  no  way  b elit tied  Mi ss  Smith.  On  the  con¬ 
trary  it  held  her  ability  to  get  listeners  as  worthy  of  emulation.  " 

XXXXXXXX 
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SANTA  FE  TRAIN  RADIO  LAST  WORD  FOR  PASSENGER  PLEASURE 


philips  3.  Patton  of  the  Farnsworth  Television  and  Radio 
Corporation  of  Fort  Wayne,  recently  gave  the  Railroad  Communications 
Club  in  Chicago  a  description  of  a  radio  system  now  being  installed 
by  his  company  for  passengers  on  Santa  Fe  trains. 

"Systems  adopted  by  other  progressive  roads  are  similar, 
but  none  is  more  comprehensive  %  Mr.  Patton  said. 

"A  train  line  is  employed  to  carry  four  program  channels: 
a  channel  of  semi-classical  music,  a  channel  of  popular  music,  a 
channel  of  standard  broadcast  radio  reception,  and  a  channel  for 
travel  talks  or  train  announcements. 

•'Room  passengers  may  select  whichever  channel  they  prefer, 
or  may,  of  course,  listen  to  none.  Chair  car  passengers  as  a  group 
have  available  to  them  these  same  selections.  The  program  select¬ 
ing  equipment  in  chair  cars,  however,  can  be  operated  only  by  the 
car  attendant,  who  must  choose  the  type  of  entertainment  believed 
most  suitable  for  the  occasion.  Except  in  the  case  of  broadcasts  of 
national  importance  and  universal  interest,  only  recorded  music  is 
distributed  in  open  cars.  Club  car  passengers  as  a  group  have  these 
same  programs  available,  also  subject  to  the  discretion  of  the 
attendant,  but  it  is  anticipated  that  the  use  of  the  popular  music 
channel  will  predominate  in  the  car  containing  the  bar. 

"The  diner  carries  its  own  separate  music  system  which 
reproduces  special  luncheon  or  dinner  music.  In  addition  to  offer¬ 
ing  a  change  of  atmosphere,  this  special  mealtime  music  speeds  up 
service  and  effectively  enlarges  the  diner  capacity.  Selections 
are  contained  in  groups  forty  minutes  long,  separated  by  five-minute 
intermissions.  It  has  been  found  that  a  large  percentage  of  the 
passengers  will  manage  to  time  their  meals  by  these  groups  and  will 
leave  the  diner  during  an  intermission.  The  pause  has  been  found 
to  be  particularly  effective  in  clearing  the  car  of  passengers  who 
have  completed  their  meal  and  are  talking,  smoking,  or  relaxing, 
while  other  passengers  wait  for  service. 

"Wire  reproducers,  radios,  and  preamplifiers  to  feed  the 
train  line  are  located  in  a  locked  compartment  in  the  lounge  car 
where  only  maintenance  personnel  at  terminals  have  access.  This 
lounge  car  program  source  supplies  all  of  the  cars  of  the  train 
line,  except  the  diner.  Remote  controls,  capable  only  of  turning 
equipment  on  and  off  and  changing  from  one  radio  station  to  another, 
are  under  the  supervision  of  the  lounge  car  attendant. 

"In  each  open  car,  six  to  ten  loud  speakers  are  recessed 
in  the  ceiling,  depending  upon  the  size  of  the  open  section.  These 
speakers  are  arranged  so  that  each  passenger  is  located  within  a 
short  distance  and  within  the  high  quality  coverage  angle  of  a 
speaker. 


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"Train  announcements  may  be  made  from  microphones  located 
in  one  or  more  cars  of  the  train.  These  announcements  automatically 
interrupt  programs  in  chair  and  lounge  cars,  and,  if  desired,  in 
the  diner.  Room  passengers,  however,  do  not  hear  train  announce¬ 
ments  automatically.  Instead,  they  are  notified  each  time  a  public 
address  microphone  is  removed  from  its  hang-up  bracket  by  the 
lighting  of  a  panel  in  the  bedroom  selector  unit  panel.  They  may 
hear  the  announcement,  if  desired,  by  pushing  the  "Train  Announce¬ 
ment'1  selector  button,  " 

xxxxxxxxxxxx 

RADIO  SET  EXPORTS  SOAR?  PROBABLY  $60,000,000  THIS  YEAR 

Commerce  Department  officials  predict  that  exports  of 
radio  sets  this  year  may  reach  $60,000,000.  The  Commerce  Depart¬ 
ment  stated  that  radio  exports  during  the  first  four  months  totaled 
$81,175,055,  more  than  five  times  as  much  as  in  the  corresponding 
months  of  last  year.  That  is  equivalent  to  an  annual  rate  of 
$93,566,000  a  year,  but  the  Department  doubted  that  would  be  attain¬ 
ed.  It  said  the  biggest  block  to  maintaining  the  current  rate  is 
the  shrinkage  of  dollar  reserves  of  many  foreign  countries, 

xxxxxxxx 

RELIEF  FROM  DIATHERMY  RADIO  INTERFERENCE  BELIEVED  IN  SIGHT 

Interference  caused  by  medical  diathermy  equipment  to 
radio  and  television  broadcasting,  police  and  fire  radio,  air  traf¬ 
fic  control,  etc,,  is  to  be  eliminated,  according  to  a  press  release 
of  the  Raytheon  Manufacturing  Company. 

"This  was  revealed",  says  the  release,  "in  approval 
certificate  D473  granted  by  the  Federal  Communications  Commission 
to  Raytheon  Mfg,  Co.  covering  its  new  Microtherm  microwave  diathermy 
unit.  The  frequency  of  2450  megacycles  has  been  assigned  for  this 
type  of  equipment. 

"Because  of  the  extreme  disturbance  caused  by  diathermy 
Interference,  on  May  9,  1947,  the  FCC  issued  public  notice  setting 
forth  proposed  rules  and  regulations  relating  to  industrial,  scien¬ 
tific  and  medical  service.  Pursuant  to  these  rules,  no  equipment 
can  now  be  manufactured  that  does  not  comply  with  these  regulations. 
The  rules  confine  the  radiation  of  diathermy  equipment  to  a  very 
limited  portion  of  the  radio  spectrum  so  that  Interference  will  not 
be  caused  to  the  other  services. 

"Raytheon’s  Microtherm,  which  uses  radar  frequency,  is  the 
first  microwave  diathermy  equipment  ever  to  receive  FCC  approval. 

Any  existing  diathermy  equipment  will  be  permitted  by  the  FCC  to 
operate  for  a  period  of  five  years  from  July  1,  provided  no  inter¬ 
ference  is  reported.  In  the  event  that  interference  is  reported  on 
any  existing  equipment,  the  operator  will  be  forced  to  discontinue 
using  the  equipment,  and  either  reengineer  it  to  meet  the  new  regu¬ 
lations  or  cease  operating  it.  " 

XXXXXXXXXX 
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He  ini  Radio  News  Service 


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OKEHING  OF  REP.  JONES  FOR  FCC  PREDICTED  ON  CAPITOL  HILL 


Congressional  sources  seemed  certain  that  Representative 
Robert  F.  Jones  (R),  of  Ohio,  would  be  confirmed  by  the  Senate 
Interstate  Commerce  Committee  to  succeed  Commissioner  Ray  Wakefield 
of  California,  whose  nomination  for  a  second  term  was  withdrawn  by 
President  Truman.  This  was  based  on  the  fact  that  (a)  Representa¬ 
tive  Jones,  during  the  hearings  of  the  Senate  Interstate  Commerce 
Monday  and  Tuesday  (July  7  and  8)  repeatedly  denied  the  charge  made 
by  Drew  Pearson,  radio  commentator  and  columnist,  that  he  had  been 
a  member  of  the  old  Black  Legion,  successor  in  Ohio  to  the  Ku  Klux 
Klan,  (b)  lack  of  confidence  in  witnesses  because  of  their  past 
records  who  were  called  from  Ohio  to  testify  against  Jones;  (c) 
desire  of  certain  Congressional  members  to  get  back  at  Pearson  for 
his  criticism  of  them  over  the  radio  and  in  the  press,  and  ( d) 
strong  backing  of  Representative  Jones  by  Senators  Taft  and  Bricker 
of  Ohio. 


Incidentally  it  was  authoritatively  denied  that  former 
Governor  James  M.  Cox,  of  Ohio,  owner  of  broadcasting  stations  in 
Dayton,  Atlanta  aid  Miami  had  urged  the  President  to  recall  Congress¬ 
man  Jones*  name  as  stated  in  the  Pearson  broadcast  last  Sunday  night, 
July  6th. 


Replying  to  sworn  statements  by  two  members  of  the  hooded 
organization  that  they  helped  induct  him,  Mr.  Jones  declared: 

"There  is  absolutely  no  tieup  by  me  with  any  organizations 
that  are  subversive.  ** 

Six  character  witnesses  appeared  on  behalf  of  Mr.  Jones 
shortly  before  he  took  the  stand.  Ohio  neighbors,  a  former  class¬ 
mate  and  a  Catholic  priest  all  testified  that  he  is  a  fair-minded 
man. 


Virgil  Herbert  Effinger,  former  Commander  of  Black  Legion 
Post  at  Lima,  acknowledged  signing  an  affidavit  that  he  witnessed 
the  alleged  ceremony,  but  said  he  could  not  recall  on  the  stand 
whether  Mr.  Jones  actually  had  been  sworn  in.  His  1938  affidavit 
said  he  saw  Mr.  Jones  take  the  oath. 

Testimony  brought  acknowledgments  by: 

1.  Police  Chief  Frank  A.  Barber,  of  Beaver  Dam,  Ohio, 

that  he  was  committed  to  a  hospital  for  the  insane  for  61  days  in 
1922  and  that  he  once  was  Jailed  for  "shooting  a  guy"  in 

Hammond,  Ind.  He  said  his  commission  to  the  hospital  resulted  from 
a  "frame  up". 

2.  Glenn  E.  Tffiebb,  of  Lima,  Ohio,  that  he  forged  19  pay¬ 
roll  checks  in  1942  while  employed  by  Lima  Cord  Sole  and  Heel  Co* 
The  checks  totaled  $653.86,  Webb  said.  He  had  testified  he 

had  administered  final  oath  to  Jones. 

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Helnl  Radio  News  Se rvlce 


7/9/4? 


Effinger,  commenting  on  an  affidavit  stating  he  was  con¬ 
victed  of  contempt  of  court,  said  he  could  not  remember  whether  he 
paid  a  $200  fine  and  served  two  months  in  Jail  for  what  Senator 
Brewster  called  nfalse  and  perjured  allegations'1  against  an  Allen 
County  (Ohio)  Judge, 

Mr,  Jones'  testimony  concluded  the  subcommittee's  open 
hearings.  Senator  Brewster  (R),  of  Maine,  Chairman,  said  the  group 
will  meet  later  this  week  to  further  consider  the  nomination, 

XXXXXXXX 

WATL,  ATLANTA,  UPHELD  BY  NLRB  IN  ADVISING  EMPLOYEE 

In  a  decision  upholding  an  employer's  right  to  free  speech 
and  expression  of  opinion,  the  National  Labor  Relations  Board 
Monday,  July  7th,  dismissed  four  out  of  five  charges  of  unfair  labor 
practices  brought  against  Radio  Station  WATL,  Atlanta,  by  the  Ameri¬ 
can  Federation  of  Radio  Artists,  AFL, 

The  NLRB  sustained  the  station's  management  in  advising  a 
newly-employed  news  editor  that  he  might  advance  further  in  the  com¬ 
pany  if  he  refrained  from  joining  a  union.  It  also  sustained  dis¬ 
missal  of  two  announcers  for  "refusal  of  duty",  and  said  the 
station's  manager  was  free  to  make  any  comment  he  liked  about  unions 
in  general. 

Moreover,  the  Labor  Board  said,  harsh  words  and  even  blows 
may  be  traded  during  heated  contract  arguments  without  being  in  vio¬ 
lation  of  the  Wagner  Act. 

On  one  point  only  did  the  union  win  its  contention.  The 
Board  ordered  reinstatement  of  Lawrence  J.  Mellert,  announcer,  whom 
the  radio  station  refused  to  rehire  because  he  had  brought  suit  for 
alleged  unpaid  salary  and  filed  charges  before  the  Labor  Board.  Mr. 
Mellert  had  been  released  to  make  way  for  returning  war  veterans, 
but  reapplied  on  learning  of  a  vacancy. 

The  NLRB  said  rejection  of  Mr.  Mellert' s  application 
because  he  filed  charges  with  the  Labor  Board  was  in  violation  of 
the  Wagner  Act,  and  said  he  must  be  reinstated  without  loss  of  pay. 

Upholding  the  right  of  free  speech  by  an  employer,  the 
Board  said  Station  Manager  Walter  Speight  (since  resigned)  did  not 
err  when  he  advised  Stanley  Raymond  that  his  prospects  in  the  com¬ 
pany  would  be  better  if  he  were  not  a  member  of  a  union. 

XXXXXXXXXXX 

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He lnl  Radio  News  Se rvice 


7/9/4? 


PETRILLO  PLAYS  WASHINGTON  FOR  TWO  DAYS  TO  CAPACITY  AUDIENCES 


Whatever  the  House  Labor  Subcommittee  may  still  have  up 
its  sleeve,  it  appeared  to  be  the  general  opinion  that  Janes  C. 
petrillo,  president  of  the  American  Federation  of  Labor,  who  many 
believed  was  called  into  the  Washington  wood-shed  for  a  good 
Congressional  spanking,  came  through  much  better  thai  those  who 
called  him  to  the  Capitol  had  expected. 

pugnacious  from  the  start,  but  for  the  most  part  appar¬ 
ently  enjoying  his  exchanges  with  the  Congressmen,  Petrillo  hit  tie 
front  page  at  the  opening  of  his  two  days  on  the  witness  stand  by 
warning  the  Labor  Subcommittee,  of  which  Representative  Kearns  (r), 
of  Pennsylvania,  himself  a  union  musician  and  former  music  teacher, 
is  Chairman,  that  his  union  would  cut  off  network  broadcasting 
February  1,  1948.  Also,  as  he  had  previously  threatened  that  the 
Union  would  refuse  to  renew  its  recording  contract. 

Later  he  modified  his  statement  to  the  extent  of  saying, 
"that's  how  I  feel  right  now".  He  added  that  "something  might  hap¬ 
pen"  to  change  his  mind  and  "maybe  none  of  it  will  materialize". 

At  present  the  music  czar  said,  603  of  the  904  stations 
In  the  United  States  employ  no  musicians. 

"Yet  those  603  run  90  per  cent  of  the  time  with  music", 

he  8 aid. 


"We  are  not  going  to  give  them  any  more  music  for  nix", 

he  added. 


He  claimed  that  musicians  are  faced  with  mass  unemployment 
and  traced  this  directly  to  commercial  musical  recordings  and  to 
chain  broadcasts. 

Pressed  for  an  explanation  of  the  decisions  of  his  organi¬ 
zation,  Mr.  Petrillo  told  the  Sub-committee: 

"All  we  can  see  ahead  in  the  future  is  ruination  for  musi¬ 
cians.  I  do  not  think  we  are  doing  anything  that  anybody  else  would 
not  do  to  protect  their  business.  " 

In  regard  to  the  recordings,  he  said  the  union  would  make 
no  more  unless  it  could  go  into  the  business  itself. 

The  highlight  of  his  second  day's  appearance  was  petrillo' s 
admission  that  under  the  newly  enacted  Taft-Hartley  law  the  American 
Federation  of  Musicians  will  have  to  abandon  the  so-called  "stand-by" 
practice  of  requiring  radio  stations,  phonograph  recording  companies 
and  theaters  to  employ  a  union  member  to  stand  by  when  a  non-union 
member  performs. 

Another  effect  of  the  new  law,  Mr.  Petrillo  said,  will  be 
to  prevent  secondary  boycotts  whereby  the  musicians'  union  occas- 


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7/9/47 


ionally  has  threatened  to  remove  big-name  bands  from  national  net¬ 
works  programs  as  a  means  of  forcing  some  small  local  station  to 
come  to  terms  in  a  labor  dispute. 

Mr.  Petrillo  readily  agreed  to  a  suggestion  by  Representa¬ 
tive  Kearns  that  he  confer  this  Summer  with  representative  music 
teachers  and  school  authorities  to  work  out  a  Nationwide  arrangement 
covering  all  disputed  points,  including  broadcasts  and  recordings  by 
school  organizations  and  the  controversial  requirement  that  stand-by 
musicians  must  be  hired  whenever  amateurs  participate  in  radio  pro¬ 
grams. 


"I*m  certainly  willing  to  sit  down  and  make  an  agreement”, 
Mr.  Petrillo  said.  "It  will  clear  up  most  of  the  misunderstanding. 
After  all,  I  come  from  the  amateur  class.  The  public  doesn’t  know 
it,  but  I  got  my  first  professional  job  on  the  basis  of  experience 
with  a  school  band.  Jane  Addams,  famous  Chicago  welfare  worker  who 
died  some  years  ago,  bought  me  ray  first  trumpet,  and  I  worked  my  way 
up  from  the  amateur  ranks.  0 

"If  it  wasn’t  for  the  Chicago  public  schools  which  paid  for 
my  lessons,  I  never  would  have  been  a  musician  myself. 

Petrillo  emphasized,  however,  that  he  would  continue  to 
fight  "attempts  by  radio  stations  to  commercialize  broadcasts  by 
school  children  or  any  similar  moves  that  would  run  counter  to  my 
predominant  aim  of  safeguarding  and  maintaining  the  bread  and  butter 
of  the  professional  musicians  in  my  organization. " 

The  Labor  Subcommittee  members  asked  Mr.  Petrillo  many 
questions  regarding  his  so-called  dictatorial  policies  not  only  with 
regard  to  the  broadcasters  but  moving  picture  theatres,  hotels  and 
night  clubs.  Many  complaints  had  been  made  Mr.  Petrillo  was  told, 
that  his  union  made  exorbitant  demands  as  to  employing  many  more 
musicians  than  were  actually  needed  and  obliged  them  to  pay  higher 
wage  scales. 

Numerous  other  witnesses  are  expected  to  be  called  and  the 
hearings  may  continue  from  time  to  time  for  several  weeks. 

XXXXXXXXXX 
BBC  NOW  USING  50  TRANSMITTERS 

For  home  programs  the  British  Broadcasting  Corporation  has 
at  present  50  transmitters  on  37  sites  in  Great  Britain;  of  these  10 
transmitters  on  six  sites  are  in  Scotland.  In  addition,  six  3BC 
transmitting  sites  in  Great  Britain  are  used  for  oversea  broadcasts; 
none  of  these  is  in  Scotland. 

The  only  33C  television  transmitter  in  Great  Britain  is 
located  at  the  Alexandra  Palace  in  London. 

xxxxxxxx 


-  10  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/9/47 


FEDERAL  RADIO  LABOR  SLOWDOWN  CAUSES  I.  T.  &  T.  LOSS 


The  International  Telephone  and  Telegraph  Corporation 
reported  last  week  that  operations  for  the  three  months  to  March  31 
resulted  in  a  net  loss  of  $2,051,402,  compared  with  a  net  loss  of 
01,520,588  in  the  comparable  period  last  year. 

Sosthenes  Behn,  President  of  I.  T.  &  T.  attributed  the 
loss  this  year  to  a  labor  slow-down  in  operations  of  the  company* s 
manufacturing  subsidiary,  Federal  Telephone  and  Radio  Corporation 
which  occurred  during  recent  negotiations  for  renewal  of  a  labor 
contract.  Operations  at  Federal's  Clifton  (N. J. )  plant  have  been 
suspended  since  May  29th. 


xxxxxxxxx 

ANTONY  WRIGHT  IS  NEW  CHIEF  ENGINEER  AT  U.  S.  TELEVISION 

The  appointment  of  Antony  Wright,  former  Manager  of  the 
Television  Receiver  Engineering  Section  of  the  Radio  Corporation 
of  America,  as  Chief  Engineer  of  United  States  Television  Mfg.  Corp. 
has  been  announced  by  Hamilton  Hoge,  UST  President.  Mr.  Wright  was 
with  the  engineering  staff  of  RCA  for  nineteen  years,  and  respons¬ 
ible  there  for  engineering  television  receivers  for  mass  production. 
During  the  war  he  was  in  charge  of  RCA’ s  airborne  television  product 
design  for  the  Armed  Forces,  a  project  which  produced  almost  all  of 
the  needs  of  the  Armed  Forces  in  this  regard. 

A  UST  press  release  states  further  : 

"United  States  Television  was  first  to  produce  large- 
screen  projection  type  television  receivers.  Of  this  type  of  tele¬ 
vision  sets,  95$  of  those  in  public  places  are  UST  models.  The  475 
square  inch  picture  is  the  largest  on  any  television  set  now  being 
produced,  and  the  set  is  in  great  demand  by  hotels,  bars,  and  restau 
rants. 


It  is  estimated  that  over  2,000,000  people  have  seen 
television  on  UST  sets. 


xxxxxxxxxx 

PANNILL  RETIRES  AS  PRESIDENT  OF  RADIOMARINE 

Charles  J.  Pannill  retired  last  week  as  President  and 
Director  of  Radiomarine  Corporation  of  America,  which  he  had  been 
with  since  1928. 

As  a  veteran  in  the  field  of  wireless,  he  served  the  radio 
industry  and  the  Government  continuously  from  1902  when  he  joined 
Professor  Reginald  A.  Fessenden  in  the  latter’s  early  wireless  exper 
iments.  In  1914,  Mr.  Pannill  left  the  Marconi  Company  to  join  the 
U.  S.  Navy  as  Expert  Radio  Aide  and  assisted  inlaying  the  foundation 
of  the  present  Naval  Communication  Service. 

xxxxxxxx 

-  11  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/9/4? 


A  HUMORIST  KIDS  FM 


Here's  one  for  Bill  Bailey,  Director,  and  the  newly  formed 
FM  Association.  In  an  article  captioned,  ‘'Reducing  With  FM",  Fred 
Othman  writes  in  the  Washington  Daily  News  ( Scripps-Howard) : 

"Your  waistline's  beginning  to  spread?  Your  wife  is  worry¬ 
ing  about  her  hips?  Then,  friend,  buy  a  frequency  modulation  radio 
set.  provides  wonderful  exercise  for  those  who  would  reduce  to 
music. 

"I  am  certain  of  this.  The  Radio  Manufacturers'  Associa¬ 
tion  predicted  2,600,000  Americans  will  buy  FM  radios  this  year.  So 
I  bought.  I  have  been  shinnying  up  on  the  roof  and  scrambling  down 
again  ever  since.  If  I  don't  break  my  silly  neck,  I'll  be  streamlined 
like  a  Rocky  Mountain  goat. 

"Why  the  manufacturers  have  not  advertised  FM  radios  as 
exercising  devices  is  not  clear  to  me.  They  said  nothing  about  this 
advantage  when  I  bought  mine.  It  was  not  cheap.  The  man  delivered 
it  and  plugged  it  in.  It  made  sputtering  noises.  No  music. 

"I  phoned  the  dealer  and  he  said  what  I  needed  was  an 
aerial.  I  said  I  had  an  aerial  for  my  old  radio.  He  said  I  needed 
a  special  FM  aerial.  "How  much?"  I  asked.  "Twenty-five  dollars, 
unless  we  run  into  trouble",  he  replied.  I  told  him  to  go  jump.  I 
said  I'd  put  in  my  own  aerial. 

"The  clerk  at  the  radio  supply  house  said  an  FM  aerial  was 
a  little  complicated.  I  said  I  was  handy  with  a  screwdriver.  So 
he  sold  me,  in  a  pasteboard  box  six  feet  long,  a  double-fold,  quarter 
and  half-wave  dipole  an  tenna  of  polished  aluminum,  calibrated  in  mega¬ 
cycles,  with  60  feet  of  300-ohm  coaxial  transmission  line  and,  he 
said,  unidirectional  characteristics. 

“I  nailed  this  to  the  roof,  as  per  directions,  strung  the 
cable  down  through  the  front  window  (my  bride,  whose  hips  are  o.k. , 
was  not  enthusiastic)  and  hitched  same  to  the  radio.  I  turned  to 
Page  3:  "Tuning  the  Dipole  Antenna. " 

"The  instructions  said  to  face  it  broadside  to  the  station 
to  be  tuned  in.  I  crawled  up  to  the  roof  again  and  loosened  the 
calibrated  dipoles.  The  book  said  to  tune  them  to  the  station  by 
sliding  like  a  trombone,  until  I  achieved  maximum  signal  strength. 

"Only  I  was  on  the  roof  and  signal  strength,  if  any,  was 
in  the  living  room,  two  floors  below.  Considerable  yelling  down  to 
ray  bride  (who  was  worrying  about  what  the  neighbors  would  think) 
brought  in  maximum  signal  strength.  I  bolted  the  dipoles  tight, 
squeezed  through  the  trapdoor,  and  went  downstairs  to  enjoy  my  new 
radio.  I  t  was,  if  I  do  say  so,  superb. 

"A  phonograph  record  was  being  broadcast.  It  was  so  clear 
and  so  staticless  thatl  could  hear  the  scratch  of  the  needle  in  the 
studio.  I  flipped  the  dial  to  another  station.  Nothing  happened, 
except  spuzzz.  What  to  do?  Mrs.  0  said  why  not  look  at  the  direc¬ 
tions. 

"To  tune  in  a  new  station  on  an  FM  radio,  the  booklet  said 
you  must  tune  the  antenna.  Back  to  the  roof  I  went  and  tuned  her  in 
and  bolted  her  tight.  And  station  No.  2  sounded  fine.  No.  1  didn't 
sound  at  all. 

(Conclused  on  page  16) 

-  12- 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/9/47 


SCISSORS  AND  PASTE 


If  You  Have  TV  Set  You  Get  To  Know  Neighbors*  Kids  Better 

(Larry  Wolters  in  "Chicago  Tribune  M ) 

In  these  d^rs  when  every  dawn  may  bring  some  new  strain 
on  the  family  ties,  it!s  good  news  when  something  that  strengthens 
the  family  circle  comes  along.  That  something  many  people  are  find¬ 
ing  in  television.  'When  popular  video  features  are  on  the  air  you 
are  likely  to  find  a  semi-circle  of  fans  clustered  about  the  receiv¬ 
er,  small  fry  on  the  floor,  in  any  television  home.  *  *  * 

Any  parents,  with  radio  pictures  in  the  house,  will  tell 
you  that  they  are  seeing  more  of  their  children  since  they  got  the 
set.  Also  more  of  the  kids  in  the  block  and  neighborhood.  And  they 
are  learning  more  about  them.  Kids  are  willing  to  stay  home  more 
and  they  often  bring  the  gang  in.  Other  grownups,  too.  And  every¬ 
body  has  a  popping  good  time  with  popcorn,  just  plain  pop,  and 
bubble  gum. 

Anormous  quantities  of  these  commodities  are  consumed  dur¬ 
ing  the  telecast  of  nine  innings  of  baseball  or  an  Australian  team 
tag  and  one  wonders  what  new  heights  of  prosperity  will  be  reached 
by  vendors  of  these  goods  when  telesets  number  millions  instead  of 
thousands. 

It  wouldn't  be  accurate  to  say  that  television  keeps  kids 
away  from  the  movies,  but  they  some  times  come  home  now  without  sit¬ 
ting  through  them  a  second  time  lest  they  miss  a  television  show. 


WS3M  Shows  Up  Politicians,  Juvenile  Delinquency  Care 

("Variety'*) 

W33M,  Chicago  CBS  outlet,  blew  the  lid  off  Juvenile  delin¬ 
quency  there  at  press  preview  of  its  new  public  service  show,  "Report 
Uncensored",  which  rends  local  political  paternalism  and  misconduct 
rampant  in  State  institutions  for  young  criminals.  The  show  goes  on 
the  air  July  7  in  evening  slot  vacated  by  Lux  Theatre  for  its  summer 
hiatus.  Materiel  is  expose  based  on  tape  recordings  gleaned  from 
unsupervised  interviews  in  State  reformatories,  such  as  St.  Charles 
Reformatory  where  payroll  padding  of  600  to  supervise  300  youngsters 
is  exposed. 

The  show  was  previewed  by  National  Conference  of  Juvenile 
Court  Judges  who  are  unanimous  in  their  approval  of  approach  to  prob¬ 
lem.  Another  preview  before  show  hits  the  air  is  skedded  for  City 
Council,  Board  of  Education  and  civic  leaders  in  Chicago,  all  vitally 
interested  since  56$  of  all  crime  committed  in  Chicago  is  perpetrat¬ 
ed  by  youngsters  under  18  years  of  age. 

Deal  has  complete  endorsement  of  Chicago  Bar  Association, 
which  will  give  free  legal  advice  in  all  cases  involving  juvenile 
crime. 


13  - 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


7/9/47 


Whiteman  Disk  Shows  No  Perfunctory  Grind 

TrI  W7  Stewart  in  %ew  York  Time  s 

As  would  be  expected  in  the  broadcast  (Mondays  through 
Fridays,  3:30  to  4:30  P.M. )  over  which  the  "dean  of  American  music" 
presides,  the  programming  of  selections  is  superior.  The  hour  is 
no  perfunctory  grind  of  repetitious  recordings.  While  naturally 
not  omitting  swing,  the  kind  served  up  is  not  of  the  cacophonous 
variety. 

Mr.  Whiteman  joshes  with  Douglas  Brown,  the  announcer  and 
would  have  his  listeners  know  that  the  products  he  advertises  carry 
his  approval.  But  in  the  aggregate  Mr.  Whiteman’s  offering  is  a 
bright  afternoon  spot. 


Radio  Senator  Whoops  It  Up  For  Townsendites 

(George  Dixon  in  "Washington  Time s-He raid") 

Senator  Glen  H.  Taylor  of  Idaho,  who  gave  up  professional 
broadcast  clowning  to  be  a  lawmaker,  was  principal  speaker  at  a 
convention  of  4,000  Townsendites  here. 

The  se  Townsendites  are  people  who  wish  to  live  openly  on 
the  people  in  contrast  to  more  retiring  parasites  who  want  to  do  it 
less  obtrusively.  As  usual  the  Townsend  plan  was  extolled  as  the 
salvation  of  those  who  do  not  cere  to  work. 

The  cowboy- radio  comedian,  who  now  carries  the  more  impos¬ 
ing  title  of  "senior  senator  from  Idaho",  whooped  it  up  for  the 
would  be  free  leaders  by  playing  his  guitar,  telling  the  story  of 
his  life,  and  erupting  occasionally  into  song.  It  was  almost  as 
dignified  as  his  performance  in  the  big  labor  veto  filibuster. 

Taylor,  who  looks  and  acts  like  a  retired  trick  bicycle 
rider  from  the  old  Pantages  time  -  he’s  always  onstage  -  brought 
down  the  place  with  applause  when  he  declared  he  would  certainly 
vote  for  the  Townsend  plan  if  given  the  opportunity. 

This  was  really  nothing  to  be  surprised  about  because  he 
has  distinguished  himself  of  late  by  voting  against  virtually  all 
constructive  legislation,  yapping  that  we  must  get  along  with  the 
Russians,  and  constantly  attacking  American  business. 

In  fact,  he  told  his  appreciative  audience  that,  "I  got 
here  over  the  bodies  of  corporations. " 

British  TV  Service  Is  Transmitting  Plays  From  Theatjres 

TMaurice  Gorham,  Headu of  BBC "Television,  has  written  to 
Will  Bolton,  Editor  of  Television  Broadcasters  Assn.  News  Letter) 

I  saw  in  your  issue  of  Aoril  24th  a  mention  of  the  first 
telecast  direct  from  a  theatre  in  the  U. S.  with  the  mention  "the 
BBC  handled  a  similar  program  in  London  several  years  ago.  "  I  am 
sure  you  will  be  interested  to  know  that  we  have  done  rather  more 
of  this  than  your  reference  implies.  In  1939,  we  did  a  dozen  dir¬ 
ect  telecasts  from  theatres,  and  since  we  reopened  in  June,  1946, 
we  have  done  nine  direct  transmissions  from  theatres  including 
straight  plays,  musical  comedies  and  variety  bills.  " 

XXXXXXXX 
-  14  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Se rvice 


7/9/47 


•  •  • 

TRADE  NOTES 

•  «  » 

_ •  •  • 


Award  of  46  scholarships  and  loans,  totaling  $14,650, 
to  employees  and  children  of  employees  have  been  announced  by  the 
General  Electric  Company.  Nineteen  scholarships  for  undergraduate 
study  were  granted,  including  13  under  the  G-E  Employees  Education 
Foundation,  part  of  a  $1,000,000  Educational  Fund  established  in 
1945  in  honor  of  two  former  company  presidents,  Charles  A.  Coffin 
and  Gerard  Swope. 


The  Zenith  Radio  Corporation  announced  Monday  that  its 
net  income  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  on  April  30  was  $594,452  after 
tax  credits  of  $908,122.  The  profit  was  equal  to  $1.21  a  share  of 
capital  stock.  It  contrasted  with  an  adjusted  net  loss  of  $99,015 
for  the  preceding  year. 


Twenty- two  student  officers  from  the  Naval  Postgraduate 
School  at  Annapolis,  Md.  ,  have  completed  a  week-long  tour  of  RCA 
Victor  Division  plants  in  Camden,  N.J.  and  at  Lancaster,  Pa.,  and 
Harrison,  N. J. ,  and  the  RCA  Laboratories  at  Princeton,  during  which 
they  viewed  and  discussed  the  latest  developments  in  many  types  of 
electronic  equipment. 

Among  the  35  subjects  discussed  during  the  two-day  period 
were  such  RCA  research  projects  as  color  television,  the  antennalyzer, 
facsimile,  electronic  counters,  and  various  new  high-powered,  high- 
frequency  tubes, 

Magnovox  Company  -  Quarter  to  May  31:  Net  profit  $627,523, 
or  $1.26  a  share,  against  $325,512,  or  65  cents  a  share,  for  May 
quarter  a  year  ago. 

That  the  British  are  now  spending  at  the  rate  of  $4,000,000 
a  year  on  television  is  reported  from  London  and  that  sets  are  sell¬ 
ing  four  times  as  fast  as  during  the  prewar  d^ys. 


Leo  B.  Pambrun,  formerly  Manager  of  Radio  Advertising  for 
the  Stewart- Warner  Corporation,  has  been  appointed  Director  of 
Advertising,  Sales  Promotion  and  public  Relations  for  the  Majestic 
Radio  and  Television  Corporation,  Elgin,  Ill. 


More  than  750  engineers,  physicists  and  chemists,  recent 
graduates  of  150  U.  S,  colleges  and  universities,  have  been  accepted 
for  employment  this  year  by  the  General  Electric  Company,  and  will 
enter  G,  E.  *  s  $1,000, 000-a-y ear  education  program. 

The  largest  number  of  1947  graduates  are  student  engineers 
who  will  enter  the  Test  Course,  which  20,000  men  and  women  have  com¬ 
pleted. 

A  featured  article  in  the  current  issue  of  The  Saturday 
Evening  Post  is  rtYou  Can* t  Say  That  On  The  Air”  by  John  Van  Loan, 


xxxxxxxxx 

-  15  - 


He ini  Radio  News  Service 


7/9/47 


PETRILLO  ONLY  A  NEWSPAPER  BUILD  UP,  CANADIANS  TOLD 


Walter  H.  Murdoch,  Canadian  executive  officer  of  the 
American  Federation  of  Musicians,  testified  in  Ottawa  last  week, 
according  to  the  Associated  press,  that  the  Federation’s  executive 
body  and  not  James  Petrillo  decided  Federation  policies. 

Mr.  Murdoch  told  the  radio  committee  of  the  House  of  Com¬ 
mons  that  United  States  newspapers  had  depicted  the  Federation’s 
president  through  cartoons  and  articles  as  something  he  was  not. 

He  said  330  of  the  newspapers  owned  radio  stations. 

A  Committee  member,  Cal  Miller,  said  that  if  Mr.  Petrillo 
was  not  a  ’’boss  king”  of  some  kind,  why  was  it  necessary  for  the 
United  States  Congress  to  pass  laws  restraining  his  powers?  Mr. 
Murdoch  replied  that  if  any  member  of  the  House  of  Commons  "moved 
some  of  the  damn  fool  legislation  that  goes  through  Congress,  he 
would  be  laughed  out  of  the  House.  ” 

xxxxxxxx 

SENATOR  ASKS  HOW  WASHINGTON,  D.  C.  DAYLIGHT  TIME  IS  WORKING 

Senator  J.  Howard  McGrath  (D),  of  Rhode  Island,  has  asked 
the  Commissioners  to  give  Congress  a  formal  report  on  his  bill  to 
put  the  District  of  Columbia  on  daylight  saving  time  every  Summer. 

Washington’s  present  daylight  saving  law  is  for  this 
Summer  only. 

Commissioner  John  Russell  Young  s  ai  d  he  had  received  only 
good  reports  on  the  present  daylight  saving  time  plan.  McGrath  said 
no  action  is  planned  until  after  the  Commissioners  submit  a  formal 
report. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


(Continuation  of  story  n A  Humorist  Kids  FM”  on  page  12) 

"There  are  six  FM  radio  stations  here  in  Washington.  Each, 
to  be  heard  properly,  calls  for  a  climb  to  the  roof,  plus  co-opera¬ 
tion  of  somebody  in  the  living  room.  The  exercise  is  wonderful, 
while  the  shouting  between  aerial  operator  and  the  lady  in  the  parlor 
is  good  for  the  lungs. 


XXXXXXXXXX 


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HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 


Radio  —  Television  —  FM  —  Communications 


2400  California  Street,  N.  W.  •  Washington  8,  D.  C. 


Robert  D.  Heinl,  Editor 


HE  CElVt 

INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  JULY  16,  1947. 

Wlirc  IpAvyri 


Caesar  Petrillo  Came;  He  Saw;  And  Some  Say  He  Conquered . 1 

* 

RCA  High.  Command  Changes;  Sarnoff,  Chairman,  Dunlap,  V-P . 3 

Federal  Trade  Commission  Cites  Radio  Kits  Concern . . . 4 

Electronics  Went  Ahead  50  Years  During  Last  Five.. . .4 

KWFT,  Wichita,  Tex.,  Sold  For  $700,000;  Joe  Carrigan  Retiring. ....  5 

Regular  Service  For  Facsimile  Broadcasting  Expected  Soon . 6 

Warner  Bros.  And  RCA  Launch  Joint  Large- Screen  Tele  Program . 7 

New  British  Television  Station . .8 

White  House  Is  Silent  Regarding  Television  Set . 8 

South  America,  Europe  Seek  600  Lines  Per  Television  Picture. ...... 8 

Two  New  Television  Color  Patents  Are  Assigned  To  RCA . 9 

Scientific  Radio  Conferences  Largely  Attended . 9 

Radio  Manufacturers’  Leaders  See  Return  To  Full  Production . 10 

FCC  Issues  First  Post-War  FM  And  Television  Licenses . . . 11 

Mrs.  David  Sarnoff  To  Make  First  Broadcast . 11 

Radio  Exports  To  Boom  In  1947 . . . . . 12 

Former  Secretary  Byrnes  Becomes  Radio  Station  Stockholder . 12 

Scissors  And  Paste... . 13 

Trade  Notes . 15 


J '• 


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I 


July  16,  1947 


CAESAR  PETRILLO  CAME;  HE  SAY/;  AND  SOME  SAY  HE  CONQUERED 


Whether  or  not  J.  Caesar  Petrlllo  outsmarted  the  Congres¬ 
sional  Labor  Subcommittee  which  celled  him  to  Washington  to  be 
spanked,  is  still  a  matter  of  opinion.  Unquestionably  though  the 
appearance  of  the  little  boss  of  the  America  Federation  of  Musicians 
has  accomplished  considerable  good.  Both  sides  have  apparently  prof¬ 
ited  by  it.  There  is  to  be  another  session  in  the  latter  part  of 
September,  as  a  House  Committee  member  explained,  rtthus  putting 
Jimmy  on  probation  for  60  days  to  see  if  his  promises  to  be  a  good 
boy  will  work  out”. 

One  of  the  ’’good  boy  promises rt  was  Petrillo’s  offering  to 
get  together  with  teachers  and  school  authorities  to  work  out  an 
arrangement  covering  all  disputed  points,  including  broadcasts  and 
recordings  by  school  organizations  and  the  controversial  require¬ 
ment  that  standby  musicians  must  be  hired  whenever  amateurs  partici¬ 
pate  in  radio  programs. 

Also  it  was  the  impression  that  Petrillo  backed  down  on 
his  feather-bedding  demands  (hiring  of  unnecessary  standby  musicians 
for  network  programs)  but  that  he  would  have  been  forced  to  any  way 
if  not  by  the  Congressional  Committee  by  the  Supreme  Court  declaring 
the  Lea  Act  constitutional  which  is  aimed  at  this  practice. 

Many  seemed  to  think  Petrillo’ s  threats  to  strike  against 
the  networks  February  1st  m  d  go  into  the  recording  business  himself 
December  31st  were  simply  bluffs  for  an  advantage  in  bargaining  for 
new  contracts.  Others  appeared  to  believe  the  gun  might  be  loaded. 
Only  Mr.  Petrillo  himself  seemed  to  have  the  answer  on  this. 

There  was  a  distinct  impression  on  the  part  of  those  who 
attended  the  hearings  that  the  labor  leader  by  his  sharp  but  mostly 
good  nature d  comeback  had  cashed  in  on  his  trip  to  Washington  and 
had  made  friends  on  the  Congressional  Committee.  At  any  rate  some 
of  his  comebacks  gave  them  the  best  laughs  they  had  had  in  a  long 
time. 

One  of  these  was  the  sidestepping  by  Representative  Carroll 
D.  Kearns  (r),  of  Pennsylvania,  Chairman  of  the  Subcommittee,  a 
professional  musician,  a  member  of  petrillo* s  union,  of  an  invitation 
to  conduct  the  amateur  orchestra  July  4  at  the  Interlochen  Music  Camp. 
Petrillo  said  if  Kearns  accepted  he’d  lose  his  union  card.  When  this 
matter  came  up  at  the  hearing  and  there  still  seemed  to  be  a  possib¬ 
ility  of  Kearns  belatedly  accepting  (which  Kearns  said  he  had  intend¬ 
ed  doing  all  along),  Petrillo  said  ominously:  "I  wouldn’t  advise 
Mr.  Kearns  to  conduct  at  Interlochen  at  this  time.  I  would  advise 
that  we  talk  the  thing  over. ” 

For  the  most  part  the  press  emtinued  critical,  the  Washing¬ 
ton  post  saying: 

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Helnl  Radio  Euslness  Letter 


7/16/47 


"Mr,  Petrlllo  represents  In  effect  the  displaced  persons 
of  a  greatly  overstocked  profession.  He  Is  the  modern  symbol  of 
resistance  to  technological  change  on  the  part  of  persons  who  see 
their  jobs  evaporating  through  greater  use  of  recordings,  1  canned* 
broadcasts,  movies  and  juke  boxes.  *  *  * 

"Mr.  Petrlllo  would  answer  this  dilemma  by  forcing  more 
widespread  employment  of  musicians  through  restriction  of  technolo¬ 
gical  advance.  Carried  to  its  extreme,  that  would  mean  that  no  new 
invention  could  ever  be  applied  when  it  meant  displacing  a  worker. 
Such  a  practice,  which  is  a  form  of  featherbedding,  would  soon  chill 
incentive.  In  Mr.  Petrillo* s  own  union  is  to  be  found  part  of  the 
solution.  The  great  majority  of  AFM  members  are  not  full-time 
musicians.  They  have  come  to  the  realization  that  there  is  not 
enough  work  to  go  around  for  the  number  of  qualified  professionals 
and  have  adjusted  their  lives  accordingly.  They  know  there  is  no 
real  security  or  satisfaction  in  made  work.  Mr.  Petrlllo  would  earn 
a  great  deal  more  sympathy  for  the  plight  of  displaced  musicians  if 
he  sought  to  ease  their  transition  into  other  fields  instead  of 
merely  striving  to  perpetuate  a  situation  which  in  reality  no  longer 
exists.  In  this  respect,  moreover,  society  has  an  obligation," 

Variety  commented  in  a  lighter  vein: 

"House  Labor  subcommittee  which  summoned  James  Caesar 
Petrillo  to  Wellington  to  heap  hot  coals  on  his  head  was  eating  out 
of  tho  AFM  boss’  hand  by  the  second  morning  of  testimony,  exchanging 
verbal  bouquets,  enjoying  his  wisecracks,  retorts,  etc. 

"Petrillo,  obviously  enjoying  himself,  frequently  had  the 
entire  audience  in  an  uproar  of  guffaws.  High  mark  of  harmony  came 
after  Petrillo,  who  several  times  declared  ’I’m  not  a  dictator*,  told 
the  Committee  that  he  and  his  union  intended  to  abide  by  the  Lea  Act. 

"Representative  Graham  Barden  (D),  N.  C. ,  who  had  jumped  on 
Petrillo  lightly  in  an  earlier  session,  told  him:  "You  know,  Ilm 
beginning  to  think  you* re  a  pretty  human  fellow.  " 

"Petrillo:  ’You  ought  to  hear  me  tell  stories  in  a  bar* 

Have  you  fellows  heard  the  one  about  the  fleas?* 

(Laughter) 

nAt  another  point  - 

"Petrillo:  ’While  we’re  talking  a  tout  it  (a  proposal  to 

sit  down  with  music  educators  and  U.  S.  military  chiefs  to  work  out 
bandplaying  agreements)  why  not  do  the  sane  with  President  Truman? 

He  plays  the  piano.  " 

"Rep.  Carroll  Kearns  (R,  Pa.):  ‘We’ll  employ  him  as  a 

standby*  * " 

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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/16/47 


RCA  HIGH  COMMAND  CHANGES;  SARNOFF,  CHAIRMAN,  DUNLAP,  V-P 


With  the  retirement  of  Lieut.  Gen.  J.  G.  Harbord  last  week 
as  Chairman  of  the  Board  of  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America, 

Brig.  Gen.  David  Sarnoff  was  elected  Chairman.  He  will  Berve  as 
RCA  Chairman  as  well  as  its  President. 

At  the  same  meeting  Orrin  E.  Dunlap  was  elected  Vice- 
President  in  charge  of  Advertising  and  Publicity  and  MaJ.  Gen.  Harry 
C.  Ingles,  USA  retired,  formerly  Chief  Signal  Officer  of  the  Army, 
now  president  of  RCA  Institutes,  was  elected  a  Director  of  RCA. 

General  Harbord  joined  RCA  on  January  1,  1983  and  served 
as  President  until  his  election  as  Chairman  in  1930.  While  he  is 
relieved  from  active  duty,  he  has  been  named  Honorary  Chairman  of  the 
Board  and  will  continue  as  a  member  of  it.  A  native  of  Bloomington, 
Ill.,  he  joined  the  Army  as  an  enlisted  man  in  1889,  receiving  pro¬ 
motions  steadily  and  played  an  active  part  in  World  War  I  with 
General  Pershing  and  President  Wilson.  He  received  the  rank  of 
Lieutenant  General  on  July  9,  1948. 

General  Sarnoff,  born  in  Russia  in  1891,  was  brought  to 
America  when  9  years  old  and  his  first  employment  was  as  a  messenger 
boy  with  the  Commercial  Cable  Company.  He  later  became  an  office 
boy  for  the  Marconi  Wireless  Company  and  lived  to  become  an  intimate 
friend  of  Marconi  himself. 

Young  Sarnoff,  later  a  ship's  wireless  operator,  came  into 
national  fane  as  wireless  operator  at  Wansmaker' s  in  New  York  at  the 
time  of  the  sinking  of  the  Titanic,  working  for  several  days  without 
sleep  receiving  names  of  those  lost  and  saved. 

In  World  War  II,  General  Sarnoff  became  a  Brigadier  General 
in  the  Amy.  Along  with  Secretary  of  State  Marshall  and  General 
Eisenhower,  General  Sarnoff  was  largely  credited  with  saving  the 
"Voice  of  America"  having  first  been  consulted  on  this  by  President 
Roosevelt. 


Mr.  Dunlap  became  Director  of  Advertising  and  Publicity 
of  RCA  on  January  1,  1944,  after  serving  for  four  years  as  Manager 
of  the  RCA  Department  of  Information. 

Before  joining  RCA  in  1940,  Mr.  Dunlap  was  Radio  Editor 
of  The  New  York  Times  for  eighteen  years,  the  Times'  first  Radio 
Editor.  His  association  with  radio  dates  to  1918,  when  he  built  an 
amateur  wireless  station  at  his  home  at  Niagara  Falls,  N.Y,  He 
was  among  the  first  to  become  a  member  of  the  American  Radio  Relay 
League  and  is  a  life  member  of  the  Veteran  Wireless  Operators* 
Association  and  a  senior  member  of  the  Institute  of  Radio  Engineers. 

Mr.  IXinlap,  who  was  chief  operator  of  the  Marconi  Wireless 
Telegraph  Company  of  America  aboard  the  S.  S.  Octorora  in  1917, 
served  during  World  War  I  as  a  radio  operator  in  the  U.  S.  Navy, 


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7/16/4? 


graduating  from  the  U.  S.  Naval  Radio  School  at  Harvard  as  one  of 
the  three  honor  men  of  the  class.  He  was  assigned  to  duty  at  the 
Naval  radio  station  NBD,  Otter  Cliffs,  Me,,  the  Navy’s  principal 
receiving  station  during  the  war  and  where  only  the  best  operators 
were  sent. 


After  graduation  from  Colgate  University  in  1920,  Mr, 

Eunlap  attended  Harvard  Graduate  School  of  Business. 

Mr.  Dunlap  is  the  author  of  ten  books  on  radio,  including 
two  on  advertising,  ’’Advertising  by  Radio”  and  ”Radio  in  Advertis¬ 
ing”.  His  other  volumes  are:  "Lunlap’s  Radio  Manual”,  ”The 

Story  of  Radio”,  "Talking  on  the  Radio”,  "The  Outlook  for  Television”, 
"Marconi;  His  Life  and  His  Wireless”,  "The  Future  of  Television” 

(1942  and  1947  editions),  "Radio’s  100  Men  of  Science",  and  "Radar: 
What  Rada.r  Is  and  How  It  Wbrks.  ” 

xxxxxxxxxxxx 

FEDERAL  TRADE  COMMISSION  CITES  RADIO  KITS  CONCERN 

False  and  misleading  advertising  of  "radio  kits”  is  charged 
in  a  complaint  issued  by  the  Federal  Trade  Commission  against  Radio 
Kits,  Inc.,  120  Cedar  Street,  New  York.  The  correspondents  are  en¬ 
gaged  in  the  interstate  sale  of  radio  parts  assembled  in  kits. 

According  to  the  complaint,  the  respondents  have  represent¬ 
ed  that  the  kits  were  designed  by  one  of  the  leading  instructors  of 
the  national  defense  program  and  by  graduate  professional  engineers; 
that  any  individual  can  build  a  complete  radio  from  the  parts  con¬ 
tained  in  the  kits  without  any  assistance  provided  he  follows  the 
diagrams  and  instructions ' supplied  with  them;  that  the  kits  contain 
all  the  necessary  parts  for  the  building  of  a  radio;  that  the  radio 
sets  assembled  from  the  parts  will  receive  the  broadcasts  of  all 
radios  operating  on  wave  length  frequencies  of  from  550  to  1500  kilo¬ 
cycles  or  550  to  1600  kilocycles;  and  that  they  own,  operate  or  dir¬ 
ectly  and  absolutely  control  a  plant  where  the  radio  parts  sold  by 
them  are  made. 

None  of  these  representations  is  true,  the  complaint 

charges. 


xxxxxxxxxx 

ELECTRONICS  WENT  AHEAD  50  YEARS  DURING  LAST  FIVE 

Senator  Reed  (R),  of  Kansas,  called  attention  to  a  remark 
made  by  FCC  Chairman  Denny  arguing  the  need  of  ade2uate  appropri¬ 
ations  that  in  the  science  of  electronics,  50  years’  progress  had 
been  made  in  the  last  four  or  five  years. 

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Helnl  Radio  Business  Letter 


7/16/47 


KWFT,  WICHITA,  TEX.,  SOLD  FOR  $700,000;  JOE  CARRIGAN  RETIRING 


Joe  B.  Carrigan  of  Wichita  Falls,  Texas,  who  began  back  in 
1912  as  an  amateur  operator  and  founded  KWFT  in  that  city  in  1936, 
last  week  sold  the  station,  subject  to  approval  of  the  Federal  Com¬ 
munications  Commission,  for  $700,000.  Purchasers  of  KWFT,  now  a  CBS 
outlet  on  620  kc.  ,  with  5000  watts  full  time,  were  Edward  H.  Rowley 
and  H.  J.  Griffith,  well  known  motion  picture  people  in  that  area  and 
Kenyon  Brown,  Director  of  Operations  of  KWFT. 

In  announcing  the  sale,  Mr.  Carrigan  said  his  retirement 
from  radio  is  upon  advice  of  his  physicians.  He  has  been  in  ill 
health  for  several  months  and  proposes  to  devote  his  full  time  to 
his  legal  practice  in  Wichita  Falls  and  Colorado  Springs,  as  well  as 
to  his  other  business  interests  after  his  recuperation. 

Messrs.  Rowley  and  Griffith  would  acquire,  between  them, 
control  of  KWFT,  holding  a  majority  of  the  stock  of  a  new  corpora¬ 
tion,  KWFT  Incorporated,  now  in  process  of  formation.  Mr.  Brown, 
who  became  Director  of  Operations  of  KWFT  last  May  1,  would  hold  a 
substantial  minority  interest  and  would  become  the  station* s  Manag¬ 
ing  Director.  Mr.  Brown  resigned  in  March  as  Vice  president  and 
General  Manager  of  KOMA,  Oklahoma  City,  after  five  years  in  that 
post. 


Both  Messrs.  Rowley  and  Griffith  have  other  recently  ac¬ 
quired  radio  interests  and  will  hold  equal  amounts  in  the  new  KWFT 
company.  Mr.  Rowley  operates  a  chain  of  theaters  in  Texas  and 
Oklahoma,  and  Mr.  Griffith  has  theaters  in  those  states  as  well  as 
in  California.  Both  are  interested  in  KXSA,  San  Angelo,  while  Mr. 
Griffith  owns  the  new  KXEP,  El  Paso.  Mr.  Griffith  also  is  an  appli¬ 
cant  for  stations  in  Parsons,  Kansas,  and  Norman,  Okla.  He,  along 
with  Mr.  Rowley  and  others,  is  interested  in  pending  AM  applications 
for  Corpus  Christi  and  Houston. 

The  $700,000  figure  does  not  include  acquisition  of  other 
assets  of  Wichita  Broadcasters,  a  partnership,  which  would  be  re¬ 
tained  by  Mr.  Carrigan  and  his  family.  Those  include  stocks  and 
bonds,  oil  interests,  and  quick  assets  totaling  roughly  $225,000. 
Wichita  Broadcasters  is  owned  25$  by  Mr.  Carrigan,  25$  by  his  wife, 
43$  by  their  daughter,  Laura  Lou,  5$  by  Dr.  P.  K.  Smith,  Wichita 
Falls  physician  aid  Mr.  Carrigan1  s  brother-in-law,  and  2$  by  Mr. 
Carrigan1 s  sister,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Carrigan  Simpson  of  Boston,  Mass. 

xxxxxxxxx 

Orson  Welles,  the  original  man  from  Mars  broadcaster, 
was  quoted  as  saying  he  didn*t  have  a  thing  to  do  with  the  flying 
discs.  "Once  was  enough”,  he  finished. 

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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


7/16/4? 


REGULAR  SERVICE  FOR  FACSIMILE  BROADCASTING  EXPECTED  SOON 


Cooperative  activity  by  manufacturers,  broadcasters,  news¬ 
paper  publishers  and  others  to  the  Federal  Communications  Commission 
and  the  Commission's  attitude  towards  it  indicates  that  transmission 
of  printed  matter  and  pictures  may  soon  become  a  regular  broadcast 
service. 


At  the  present  time,  facsimile  broadcasting  is  on  an  ex¬ 
perimental  basis  pending  the  formulation  of  rules  and  standards. 
Several  M  stations  have  from  time  to  time  been  authorized  to  ex¬ 
periment  with  facsimile  during  hours  not  devoted  to  regular  broad¬ 
casting,  and  these  demonstrations  have  attracted  considerable  atten¬ 
tion. 


Since  facsimile  transmitters  and  receivers  have  a  "lock- 
and-key”  relationship,  as  in  television,  transmission  standards  are 
required  so  that  any  facsimile  receiver  will  operate  from  any  fac¬ 
simile  station  in  its  area. 

The  Radio  Technical  Planning  Board  recently  submitted  pro¬ 
posed  transmission  standards  to  the  Commission  for  consideration 
under  Section  3.266  of  the  Commission's  rules  which  rule  provides 
for  facsimile  operation  by  FM  broadcast  stations.  Since  there  has 
been  a  difference  of  opinion  in  the  development  of  the  proposed 
standards,  however,  as  to  whether  both  8. 2n  and  4.1”  scanning  lines 
should  be  provided  at  the  same  line  rate  of  105  lines  per  inch,  and 
since  there  has  been  a  limited  amount  of  experimental  operation  and 
demonstrations  to  indicate  public  preference,  the  Commission  has 
requested  that  further  operation  and  comparisons  be  conducted.  Upon 
the  completion  of  such  tests,  it  is  believed  that  standards  may  be 
adopted  promptly. 

Other  facsimile  activity  includes  a  facsimile  news  service 
for  airplane  passengers  which  has  been  tested  in  flight.  Radioed 
press  dispatches  were  printed  on  an  airliner  in  four  columns  at  the 
rate  of  500  words  a  minute.  Operations  by  a  New  York  bank  were  aid¬ 
ed  through  r^pid  transmission  of  reproductions  of  checks  and  other 
documents  from  the  bank's  downtown  central  signature  file  to  its  up¬ 
town  headquarters  in  57  seconds.  By  using  microwave  transmission, 
facsimile  has  been  relayed  from  Boston  to  New  York,  The  Army  Air 
Forces  is  installing  a  facsimile  system  to  transmit  weather  maps 
over  the  nation  for  the  information  of  pilots. 

Other  possibilities  of  facsimile  invite  interesting  specu¬ 
lation.  For  example,  there  is  talk  that  facsimile  may  some  day  be 
used  as  an  adjunct  to  the  telephone,  so  that,  failing  to  get  an 
answer,  the  caller  may  leave  a  message  which  will  be  found  at  the 
phone  when  the  person  returns. 

xxxxxxxxxx 

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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/16/47 


WARNER  BROS.  AND  RCA  LAUNCH  JOINT  LARGE-SCREEN  TELE  PROGRAM 


The  RCA  Victor  Division  of  the  Radio  Corporation  of 
America  and  Warner  Bros.  Pictures,  Inc. ,  have  signed  a  contract  for 
a  Joint  program  of  research  on  large-screen  television. 

Harry  M.  Warner,  President  of  Warner  Bros.;  Jack  L.  Warner, 
Vice-President  in  charge  of  production;  and  Frank  M.  Folsom,  Execu¬ 
tive  Vice  President  of  RCA  in  charge  of  the  RCA  Victor  Division, 
made  the  Joint  announcement,  calling  the  cooperative  arrangement  an 
historic  step  toward  the  development  of  large-screen  television  in 
the  motion  picture  industry.  The  research  and  experimental  program, 
it  is  predicted,  will  be  as  important  as  the  first  tentative  efforts 
to  put  sound  on  film  more  than  20  years  ago  ,  they  believe. 

New  types  of  black-and-white  large-screen  television  equip¬ 
ment  have  been  developed  by  the  RCA  Engineering  Products  Department 
in  its  Camden,  New  Jersey,  plant  and  the  first  elements  of  this  tele¬ 
vision  equipment  will  be  shipped  immediately  to  the  Warner  Brothers 
Burbank  Studio.  Other  components  will  be  supplied  later.  In  addi¬ 
tion,  RCA  will  provide  technical  and  research  information  and  the 
assistance  of  engineering  personnel  and  field  engineers. 

Col.  Nathan  Levinson,  head  of  the  Studios’  Engineering 
and  Technical  Research  Staff,  will  direct  the  experimental  program 
for  Warner’ s. 

Commenting  on  the  Joint  program,  Frank  M.  Folsom,  drew  a 
parallel  between  Warner  Bros,  foresight  in  undertaking  this  pioneer¬ 
ing  work  and  its  early  achievements  with  sound  film. 

"Last  year”,  Mr,  Folsom  declared,  "Warner’s  celebrated  the 
twentieth  anniversary  of  the  birth  of  sound  pictures.  I  am  confident 
that  ini  967  this  company  will  be  observing  the  20th  anniversary  of 
large-screen  television  in  the  motion  picture  industry. n 

RCA  first  demonstrated  large-screen  television  at  the  New 
Yorker  Theatre  early  in  1941,  At  that  time  scenes  televised  from 
Madison  Square  Garden,  Ebbett’s  Field  and  Camp  Upton  were  projected 
on  a  15  x  20  foot  theatre  screen. 

Intensive  laboratory  research  and  development  carried  on 
since  then  by  RCA  scientists,  working  on  applications  of  large- 
screen  television  for  military  purposes,  has  contributed  to  vast 
improvements  in  tubes,  electronic  circuits,  and  components,  result¬ 
ing  in  pictures  of  excellent  quality  by  comparison  with  any  previous¬ 
ly  demonstrated. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/16/47 


NEW  BRITISH  TELEVISION  STATION 


Orders  have  been  placed  with  Electric  and  Musical  Indus¬ 
tries,  Ltd.,  for  the  supply  of  the  television  transmitter  and  with 
Maroni’s  Wireless  Telegraph  Co.,  Ltd.,  for  the  supply  of  the  sound 
transmitter  for  the  BBC’s  second  television  station,  which  will  be 
at  Birmingham,  England,  in  a  great  manufacturing  centre. 

Orders  have  also  been  placed  with  the  Marconi  Company  for 
the  supply  of  television  and  sound  transmitters  for  a  subsequent 
station,  the  location  of  which  remains  to  be  decided  in  conjunction 
with  the  Television  Advisory  Committee. 

The  Birmingham  Station  will  relay  the  London  television 
program  and  is  expected  to  serve  an  area  round  Birmingham  of  about 
forty  miles  radius. 


XXXXXXXX 

WHITE  HOUSE  IS  SILENT  REGARDING-  TELEVISION  SET 

No  comment  was  forthcoming  at  the  Executive  Offices  upon 
a  United  Press  dispatch  from  Passaic  that  President  Truman  is  having 
a  television  set  Installed  at  the  White  House.  In  the  dispatch  a 
spokesman  for  the  Allan  B.  Dumont  Laboratories,  Inc.,  was  quoted  as 
saying  that  a  set,  which  the  President  ordered,  but  which  the  com¬ 
pany  said  it  plans  to  present  as  a  gift,  is  to  be  delivered  at  the 
White  House  by  truck  immediately. 

The  company  spokesman  described  the  set  as  having  televi¬ 
sion,  an  automatic  record  changer  and  M  reception,  valued  at 
81,795. 


XXXXXXXX 

SOUTH  AMERICA,  EUROPE  SEEK  600  LINES  PER  TELEVISION  PICTURE 

Television  is  broadcast  from  Alexandra  Palace  in  Great 
Britain  on  the  basis  of  405  lines  per  picture,  but  orders  for  tele¬ 
vision  equipment  from  South  America  and  Europe  received  by  a  British 
firm  call  for  transmitters  and  receivers  which  will  broadcast  on  the 
basis  of  600  lines  per  picture. 

"The  additional  lines  can  provide  a  greater  degree  of 
definition  than  is  obtainable  in  Great  Britain",  the  Commerce  Depart¬ 
ment  reports.  "American  companies  have  offered  to  supply  apparatus 
In  the  standard  American  system  of  525  lines  per  picture. 

"The  600-line  transmissions,  although  better  than  the  405- 
line,  will  not  equsl  the  definition  of  the  cinema  theater,  for  which 
it  is  claimed  a  1,000-line  picture  will  be  necessary. " 

XXXXXXXX 


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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/16/47 


TWO  NEW  TELEVISION  COLOR  PATENTS  ARE  ASSIGNED  TO  RCA 


Two  new  color  television  systems  have  been  patented  by 
Dr.  Alfred  N.  Goldsmith  of  New  York,  which  he  has  assigned  to  the 
Radio  Corporation  of  America. 

The  first  (No.  2,423,769)  comprises  the  steps  of  producing 
an  independent  series  of  signals  representative  of  each  of  a  plural¬ 
ity  of  predetermined  primary  colors  of  the  object  whose  image  is  to 
be  reproduced,  producing  a  further  independent  series  of  signals 
representative  only  of  the  visual  brightness  of  the  colors  of  the 
object  and  sequentially  transmitting  all  of  the  produced  series  of 
signals. 

The  other  system  (No.  2,243,770)  is  so  devised  as  to  pro¬ 
duce  an  independent  series  of  signals  representative  of  each  of  a 
predetermined  plurality  of  primary  colors  of  the  object  whose  image 
is  to  be  reproduced,  a  further  independent  series  of  signals  to 
represent  the  combined  intrinsic  brightness  of  the  several  colors  of 
the  object,  simultaneously  transmitting  the  independent  series  as 
color  signal  indicia,  transmitting  also  the  combined  intrinsic 
brilliance  signals  and  alternating  the  two  transmissions  according 
to  a  selected  time  cycle. 


xxxxxxxx 

SCIENTIFIC  RADIO  CONFERENCES  LARGELY  ATTENDED 

Maximum  attendance  marked  conferences  of  radio  scientific 
bodies  in  Washington.  In  fact,  the  Joint  meeting  of  the  American 
Section  of  the  International  Scientific  Radio  Union  and  the  Institute 
of  Radio  Engineers  proved  to  be  the  largest  such  gathering  in  the 
history  of  these  meetings,  both  as  to  the  number  of  papers  and  attend¬ 
ance.  The  variety  of  subject  matter  and  the  scope  of  the  ninety-odd 
papers  presented  at  the  sessions  provided  further  evidence  of  the  ex¬ 
panding  horizon  of  the  radio  art  in  the  postwar  world.  For  the  first 
time  at  these  meetings,  it  was  necessary  to  schedule  simultaneous 
sessions.  Of  600  registered  at  the  meeting,  approximately  150  came 
from  outside  the  Washington  area.  The  program  included  papers  from 
Sweden  and  Canada,  as  well  as  the  United  States. 

A  Conference  on  Radio  Propagation  called  by  the  National 
Bureau  of  Standards1  Central  Radio  Propagation  Laboratory  was  attend¬ 
ed  by  about  75  specialists  in  the  various  phases  of  radio  propagation. 
IXiring  the  conference,  sessions  were  held  on  the  following  topics: 
Ionospheric  measurement  technics  and  problems  (J.  H.  Dellinger,  Chair¬ 
man);  ionospheric  propagation  analysis  and  prediction;  physics  of 
the  ionosphere;  effects  of  the  sun  on  the  ionosphere;  cosmic  radio 
noise;  and  propagation  at  VHF  and  higher  frequencies. 

The  status  of  work  in  these  fields  since  the  war  was  sur¬ 
veyed  and  ideas  were  interchanged  on  the  most  desirabLe  lines  that 
should  be  followed  in  the  future.  A  number  of  government,  university, 
and  industrial  laboratories  are  occupied  in  this  work.  The  Conference 
was  conducted  by  informal  discussions  and  exchange  of  views,  rather 
than  by  the  presentation  of  formal  papers. 

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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/16/47 


RADIO  MANUFACTURERS*  LEADERS  SEE  RETURN  TO  FULL  PRODUCTION 


Apparently  the  radio  set  makers  are  getting  back  to  normal. 
Paul  V.  Galvin,  of  Chicago,  Chairman  of  the  Set  Division  of  the 
Radio  Manufacturers1  Association,  said: 

"The  past  year  has  seen  a  complete  change  in  radio  set  pro¬ 
duction  as  the  industry  has  moved  out  of  a  reconversion  period,  beset 
by  material  and  component  shortages,  into  a  more  normal  state  of  free 
competition  in  which  the  industry* s  output  has  been  at  record  levels.  " 

Receiving  tubes,  which  were  often  hard  to  get  in  1946,  were 
in  good  supply  by  the  end  of  the  first  quarter  of  1947,  retiring 
Chairman  Max  F.  Ealcom  of  the  Tube  Division,  of  Emporium,  Pa.,  and 
new  president  of  the  Radio  Manufacturers*  Association,  reported.  A 
total  of  805,000,000  tubes  were  either  produced  or  sold  out  of 
Government  surplus  during  1946  as  compared  with  139,000,000  in  1945, 
and  135,000,000  in  1941,  the  last  prewar  year,  he  said. 

Meanwhile,  the  huge  surplus  of  radio  and  electronic  equip¬ 
ment  left  over  from  the  war  has  been  screened  of  the  better  items 
and  by  the  withdrawal  of  other  items  by  the  military  agencies,  Mr. 
Balcom  reported  as  Chairman  of  the  Surplus  Disposal  Committee. 

While  admitting  that  the  movement  of  surplus  had  often 
been  slow,  Mr.  Ealcom  expressed  the  opinion  that  the  manufacturer- 
agent  contract  system  had  returned  to  the  government  a  "substantial 
portion  of  its  investment".  At  the  same  time  he  pointed  out  that 
"many  electronic  items  produced  for  the  war  are  not  usable  in  com¬ 
mercial  markets  and  should  either  be  salvaged  or  totally  scrapped  by 
the  Government.  n 

Former  RMA  President  R.  C.  Cosgrove,  of  Cincinnati,  in  his 
report  concluding  three  years*  service  as  RMA  head,  emphasized  the 
return  to  normalcy  of  the  radio  industry  and  the  high  rate  of  pro¬ 
duction  in  1947, 

"All  of  the  elements  of  normality  in  the  radio  business 
are  here  -  very  much  so",  he  said,  and  cited  overproduction,  unbal¬ 
anced  inventories,  and  cut  prices  as  indicative  of  the  recent 
industry  trend. 

RMA  points  out  that  about  15,000,000  radio  receivers  were 
produced  in  1946  and  that  the  monthly  outpur  during  the  first  part 
of  1947  was  higher  than  in  the  previous  year. 

The  return  of  the  radio  industry  to  normal  competition  was 
not  without  its  casualties,  the  RMA  Credit  Committee  reported. 
Twenty-four  manufacturers  failed  during  the  past  fiscal  year  with 
liabilities  of  $7,844,043  as  compared  with  eight  with  liabilities 
of  $4,232,000  in  1945-46,  Chairman  E.  G.  Carlson,  of  Chicago,  re¬ 
ported.  These  included  9  set,  7  amplifier  and  record  player,  6 
component,  and  2  electric  clock  manufacturers, 

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7/16/47 


FCC  ISSUES  FIRST  POST-WAR  FM  AND  TELEVISION  LICENSES 


The  first  FM  and  television  licenses  issued  by  the  Federal 
Communications  Commission  since  the  war  have  been  issued  to  four  FM 
stations  and  one  television  station. 

The  new  FM  licensees  are:  WFBL-FM,  Onondaga  Radio  Broad¬ 
casting  Corp. ,  Syracuse,  N.Y. ;  WIBW-FM,  Topeka  Broadcasting  Associ¬ 
ation,  Inc.,  Topeka,  Kans.  ;  WINC-FM,  Richard  Field  Lewis,  Jr., 
Winchester,  Va.  ;  WOPI-FM,  Radiophone  Broadcasting  Station  WOPI,  Inc., 
Bristol,  Tenn. 

These,  together  with  the  48  FM  stations  which  functioned 
during  the  war,  make  a  total  of  52  FM  broadcast  stations  now  licens¬ 
ed.  However,  245  FM  broadcast  stations  are  actually  on  the  air. 

The  latter  include  some  of  the  821  FIJI  stations  currently  authorized  - 
636  of  which  hold  construction  permits  and  195  others  with  condi¬ 
tional  grants.  In  addition,  there  are  151  applications  for  FM  broad¬ 
cast  facilities. 

The  first  commercial  television  station  license  issued 
since  the  war  goes  to  WNBT  of  the  National  Broadcasting  Co.,  Inc., 
at  New  York.  This  license,  however,  covers  changed  facilities  for 
this  station  which  was  one  of  the  six  commercial  television  broad¬ 
cast  stations  which  functioned  during  the  war. 

At  the  present  time,  there  are  six  licensed  television 
stations,  59  under  construction,  and  10  pending  applications. 

XXXXXXXX 

MRS,  DAVID  SARNOFF  TO  MAKE  FIRST  BROADCAST 

Mrs.  David  Sarnoff,  wife  of  Brig.  Gen.  David  Sarnoff, 
President  and  Chairman  of  the  Board  of  the  Radio  Corporation  of 
America,  will  make  her  first  radio  appearance  on  the  ’’Betty  Crocker 
Magazine  Of  The  Air”  over  ABC  on  Monday,  July  21,  at  10*25  A.M. ,  EDT. 

Mrs.  Sarnoff  will  answer  Life  Magazine’s  recent  article  on 
the  ’’American  Woman’s  Dilemma”.  She  will  point  out  many  interesting 
and  constructive  careers  which  she  considers  tailor-made  for  women 
over  40  -  activities  and  pursuits  which  are,  in  her  opinion,  within 
the  reach  of  any  intelligent  woman,  regardless  of  financial  status 
or  whether  she  lives  in  an  urban  or  rural  area. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

A  wide-ranging  sales  promotion  and  advertising  campaign  on 
RCA  Victor  portable  radios  has  been  launched  which  is  expected  to 
call  the  attention  of  about  100  million  people  to  these  portable  sets 
this  Summer. 

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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/16/47 


RADIO  EXPORTS  TO  EOOM  IN  1947 


During  1946,  Radio  Receivers  came  into  volume  production 
in  the  United  States  for  the  first  time  since  1942  and  were  exported 
in  substantial  quantities  to  most  foreign  countries,  according  to 
George  R.  Donnelly,  Office  of  International  Trade,  Department  of 
Commerce. 


During  the  past  year,  exports  of  radio  receivers,  radio 
receiving  tubes,  components  and  accessories  reached  the  second  larg¬ 
est  volume  since  this  group  was  separately  classified  in  foreign** 
trade  statistics  in  1922,  Exports  of  this  group  totaled  $39,637,427 
In  1946  -  one-third  greater  than  in  the  prewar  peak  year  1937  and 
almost  double  the  1939  trade.  However,  exports  were  about  $5,000,000 
below  the  all-time  record  radio  export  year  1944,  when  the  total  was 
044,781,289,  including  $32,  941,637  of  lend-lease  exports. 

Exports  of  radio  receiving  equipment  in  1947  will  undoubt¬ 
edly  greatly  exceed  those  of  1946.  During  the  first  4  months  of  1947 
alone,  exports  totaled  $31,175,055  -  more  than  five  times  as  much  as 
in  the  corresponding  period  of  1946  and  equaling  85  percent  of  the 
total  for  the  entire  year  1946.  If  exports  should  continue  at  the 
same  rate  for  the  remaining  8  months,  the  year’s  sales  abroad  would 
reach  the  amazing  total  of  $93,566,000.  Although  this  figure  is  not 
expected  to  be  achieved,  a  record  volume  of  more  than  $00,000,000  is 
practically  certain  to  be  attained. 

The  most  important  obstacle  to  the  maintenance  of  the  cur¬ 
rent  rate  of  our  exports  is  the  foreign-exchange  situation.  In  1946, 
United  States  goods  were  purchased  by  many  foreign  countries  at  a 
much  greater  rate  than  was  anticipated  by  their  governments,  so  their 
dollar  reserves  are  now  becoming  depleted. 

Mr.  Donnelly  writes  at  length  upon  the  radio  export  situ¬ 
ation  in  the  Foreign  Commerce  Weekly  published  by  the  Comne  rce  Depart¬ 
ment  in  Washington  (July  5  issue). 

XXXXXXXX 

FORMER  SECRETARY  BYRNES  IEC0MES  RADIO  STATION  STOCKHOLDER 

The  Federal  Communications  Commission  last  week  approved 
a  plan  by  which  former  Secretary  of  State  James  F.  Byrnes  will  become 
part  owner  of  a  radio  station  in  his  home  town  of  Spartanburg,  S,  C. 
The  plan  involves  a  rearrangement  of  holdings  in  Spartanburg  sta¬ 
tions  WORD  and  WORD-FM,  and  WSPA  and  WSPA—  FM.  Mr.  Byrnes,  now 
practising  law  at  Spartanburg,  will  become  a  5  per  cent  stockholder 
in  WORD  and  WORD-FM  in  association  with  Welter  J.  Brown,  his  long¬ 
time  special  assistant  during  Mr.  Byrnes*  Government  service. 

Brown,  former  Washington  correspondent,  had  been  connected 
with  WSPA  but  will  leave  this  station  to  join  Mr.  Byrnes. 

XXXXXXXX 

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7/16/47 


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SCISSORS  AND  PASTE 


Calls  "Pay  As  You  SeeIT  Ruml  Plan  Fo r  Television 

(  "Indianapolis  Star1*!" 

Several  possibilities  and  problems  come  to  mind  with  E.  F. 
McDonald’s  proposal  of  pay-as-you-see  home  entertainment,  which  is 
a  sort  of  a  Ruml  plan  for  television.  Mr.  McDonald,  President  of 
Zenith  Radio,  would  connect  your  receiver  to  the  telephone  and 
charge  up  your  entertainment  on  the  telephone  bill.  This,  of  course, 
would  do  away  with  sponsored  television.  You1 d  pay  for  your  tele¬ 
vision  show  as  you  do  for  any  public  entertainment,  except  that  you’d 
pay  for  it  the  first  of  the  month. 

First  the  idea  must  get  FCC  and  probably  ICC  approval.  Up 
to  now,  radio  and  television  have  been  licensed  according  to  the 
quaint  notion  that  the  air  is  free.  That  doesnft  hold  with  Mr. 
MeDonaldfs  Ruml  plan.  You  get  a  blurred  image  free  with  your  tele¬ 
vision  set.  But  you  have  to  call  the  telephone  operator  and  get  some 
key  frequencies  piped  in  before  you  can  see  what’s  going  on.  The  key 
frequencies  are  wbat/you  pay  for.  There  is  also  a  ruling  in  some 
States  that  you  can't  attach  ’’foreign  devices”  to  Mr.  Bell’s  invention 

Those  are  some  of  the  unsolved  problems.  But  we  don’t  say 
they  can’t  be  solved  or  that  the  result  would  be  disastrous.  The 
player  piano  was  supposed  to  end  private  study  and  performance.  The 
movies  were  supposed  to  kill  the  theatre.  Radio  in  turn  was  going 
to  kill  both  of  these,  and  such  things  as  phonograph  records  and 
baseball  to  boot.  Rut  they  all  seem  to  be  going  strong.  So  there's 
probably  room  for  television. 


Nine  New  TV  Stations  In  Sight 
(  Co  del'  s’nrTele  vision  Digest  and  FM  Reports”) 

"Television  Digest  and  PM  Reports”,  made  a  survey  among 
construction  permit  holders  for  television  stations  to  determine  how 
soon  they  expect  to  begin  operation.  Here  are  the  results: 

Washington  Star’s  WTVW  -  October;  WWRT,  Baltimore  - 
October;  WMAR,  Baltimore  -  December;  WGNA,  Chicago  -  October;  WEWS, 
Cleveland  ~  November;  WTMJ-TV,  Milwaukee  -  December. 

The  following  indicated  they  expect  to  get  on  the  air 
’’sometime  this  Fall”:  WFIL-TV,  Philadelphia;  WEZ-TV,  Boston;  KCPN, 
Fort  Worth;  WTVR,  Richmond,  Va. 


Render  Unto  Caesar 

(Fred  Othman  in"’irWashington  Daily  News”) 

The  wqy  the  movie  lights  were  searing  the  small  black  eyes 
of  James  Caesar  Petrillo  you’d  have  thought  he  was  undergoing  the 
third  degree. 

He  was.  The  House  Labor  subcommittee  used  everything  on 
him  but  a  rubber  hose.  It  wouldn’t  even  let  him  cus$. 


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7/16/47 


"I*  11  be  da—",  began  the  exasperated  Little  Caesar  of 
the  union  musicians. 

"Ah,  ah,  Mr.  Petrillo",  cautioned  Rep.  Carroll  D.  Kearns 
(R.,  Pa.),  the  Chairman.  ’’Remember,  you1  re  on  the  air.  " 

The  portly  Petrillo  in  sounding  the  sour  note  sat  down  in 
the  beam  of  three  photographic  spotlights,  planted  his  two-tone 
shoes  on  the  carpet  and  testified  he  was  boss  of  every  professional 
musician  in  the  United  States  and  Canada.  When  he  says  "frog*  they 
Jump.  So  do  the  recording  companies,  the  radio  networks,  the  movies, 
the  frequency  modulation  broadcasters  and  the  television  people. 

Petrillo  said  the  curse  of  the  professional  musician  is 
the  phonograph  record.  Juke  boxes  are  bad  enough  in  saloons  and  in 
hotels  to  provide  the  music  for  weddings,  he  said.  "But  now  they 
bury  people  to  Juke  boxes®,  he  cried.  "Yes,  sir".  Insisted  Little 
Caesar,  "Right  under  the  casket  they  got  the  Juke  box.  ” 

The  Congressmen  mentioned  complaints  from  radio  stations, 
mostly  about  his  union  insisting  on  them  hiring  musicians  they  don’t 
need. 

"By  G--",  replied  Petrillo,  checking  himself  with  another 
glance  at  the  microphones,  "The  radio  don’t  like  our  contracts. 

It  makes  complaints.  So  we* re  contemplating  to  allow  no  station  to 
hire  musicians  and  feed  any  other  station. " 

"You  mean  to  eliminate  all  chain  broadcasting  of  music?” 
demanded  Rep.  Kearns. 

Yes",  snapped  Caesar.  "They’re  unsatisfied  now.  So 
let  ’em  be  satisfied.  " 

"Yes,  we’ll  satisfy  ’em",  the  boss  musician  continued. 

"If  they  want  music,  let  ’em  hire  musicians  to  play  it  and  no  more 
of  this  wire  stuff.  If  they  want  to  hear  Mr.  Toscanini  down  in 
Chattanooga,  say,  let  ’em  hire  Mr.  Toscanini  to  go  down  there  and 
play.  " 

He  won’t  allow  Hollywood  to  sell  msuical  films  to  tele¬ 
vision,  he  said,  nor  will  he  let  the  radio  folks  pipe  in  music  from 
Europe.  One  Congressman  called  him  a  monopoly  in  restraint  of  trade. 


The  Night  McGulnness  Talked  To  The  Whole  United  States 

( Richard  H.  Rove re  in  the  "New  Yorker" ) 

Peter  J.  Me  Guinness,  Democratic  leader  of  the  section  of 
Brooklyn  called  Greenpoint,  likes  making  speeches,  marching  in  par¬ 
ades,  attending  weddings  and  funerals,  and  running  Kiddies*  Day  out¬ 
ings.  He  says  that  the  greatest  thrill  he  ever  had  came  during  the 
1936  Democratic  National  Convention  in  Philadelphia,  when  Jim  Farley 
asked  him  to  read,  over  a  national  hookup,  the  convention  resolution 
thanking  the  radio  companies  for  their  coverage  of  the  convention. 

"Be Jesus",  he  says,  "I  stood  up  there  on  the  platform  with  the  Vice- 
President  of  the  United  States  behind  me,  and  senators,  and  governors 
from  States  that  are  Democratic,  and  I  talked  to  the  whole  United 
States.  I’m  telling  you,  you  could  Just  see  the  sweat  run  down  me 
back.  Right  then  me  whole  life  passed  before  me  eyes.  " 

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t  i 

TRADE  NOTES  :: 

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_ •  • 


production  of  television  receivers  this  year  will  exceed 
250,000  and  for  1948  will  reach  1,500,000,  Dorman  Israel,  Vice-Presi¬ 
dent  of  Engineering  and  Production,  Emerson  Radio  &  Phonograph  Corp¬ 
oration,  predicted  addressing  a  distributors’  meeting  in  New  York, 

Mr.  Israel  ruled  out  immediate  price  reductions  for  television  re¬ 
ceivers  but  said  that  production  techniques  are  being  developed  so 
that  the  instrument  will  "inevitably "  follow  a  course  similar  to 
that  of  radio, 

Mr.  Israel  revealed  that  the  company  now  is  experimenting 
with  a  projection  view  model  utilizing  a  three-inch  tube  with  an 
image  1.8  inches  by  2.4  Inches.  The  picture,  when  projected  on  a 
screen  should  produce  a  maximum  image  of  18  x  24  inches.  He  said 
that  the  receiver  may  be  ready  to  market  in  six  to  eight  months. 


KPD-FM,  NBC  outlet  in  San  Francisco  ,  construction  permit 
calls  for  an  antenna  height  above  the  terrain  1,220  feet  which  calls 
for  one  of  the  loftiest  towers  in  the  United  States,  power  will  be 
45  KW. 


Federal  Judge  G-unnar  Nordbye,  of  Minneapolis,  last  week 
denied  the  motion  of  summary  judgment  made  last  December  by  Benny 
Berger,  operator  of  a  chain  of  theatres  in  Minnesota  and  Wisconsin, 
in  the  action  which  had  been  brought  by  ASCAP  members  for  infringe¬ 
ment  of  their  copyrights. 

Berger  had  alleged  that  the  method  by  which  ASCAP  licensed 
the  theatres  was  a  violation  of  the  Sherman  Act  in  restraint  of 
trade.  The  Court  threw  the  claim  out,  and  upheld  ASCAP  in  all  of  its 
contentions. 


Radio  stations  allocate  one-third  of  their  selling  expenses 
to  advertising,  promotion  and  publ  iclty,  a  study  made  by  the  National 
Association  of  Broadcasters  shows. 

The  study  reveals  the  station’s  total  selling  expense  is 
10.652  of  net  revenue.  Salaries,  wages  and  commissions  account  for 
5.8$;  advertising,  promotion  and  publicity  3.6$;  and  other  selling 
expenses,  1.2$. 

Stating  that  he  had  heard  many  people  say  "Television  isn't 
radio,  it  isn’t  movies,  it  isn’t  theatres,  it  calls  for  a  new  techni¬ 
que.  It  needs  instantaniety ,  spontaniety  and  a  lot  of  other  "eities", 
Ralph  B.  Austrian,  President,  RKO  Television  Corporation,  commented. 

"I  don’t  believe  it.  What  it  needs  is  a  new  selling  technique  coupl¬ 
ed  with  high  grade  professional  showmanship.  Movies  today  offer  the 
lowest  cost  per  hour  visual  entertainment  in  the  world.  You  may 
give  your  entertainment  to  the  public  free,  but  if  it  isn’t  top 
grade,  professional  polished  and  competitive,  you  will  find  your  pub¬ 
lic  saying,  "Let’s  turn  this  thing  off  and  go  to  the  movies.  " 


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7/16/47 


A  new  electronic  timer,  particularly  adapted  for  use  with 
a  falling-ball  viscosimeter  in  the  study  of  the  rapidly  changing 
viscosity  of  an  opaque  fluid,  has  been  designed  by  p.  J.  Franklin 
of  the  National  Bureau  of  Standards.  The  device  consists  of  pulse- 
sharpening  and  trigger  circuits,  and  the  passage  of  the  ball  through 
two  coils  around  the  viscosimeter  tube  is  used  to  trigger  a  radio¬ 
frequency  oscillator,  starting  and  stopping  a  timing  device. 

Daylight  saving  time  for  Washington,  D.  C.  was  recommended 
last  week  by  the  Senate  District  Committee.  The  Committee  approved 
and  forwarded  to  the  Senate  the  bill  of  Senator  J,  Howard  McGrath 
(D.  ,  R.I.)  to  make  daylight  saving  time  an  annual  event  in  Washington. 

McGrath  led  the  fight  to  get  daylight  saving  time  for 
Washington  this  Summer,  the  present  law,  however,  is  good  for  this 
year  only. 

The  Senate  District  group  endorsed  the  plan  by  a  unanimous 
voice  vote. 

A  new  parts-packaging  program  affecting  some  33,000  radio 
phonograph,  television  and  miscellaneous  parts  and  products  compris¬ 
ing  the  entire  line  of  the  Renewal  Sales  Section  of  the  RCA  Tube 
Department  has  just  been  completed. 

In  addition  to  aiding  customer  identification,  the  bright, 
familiar  colors  of  the  new  packages  are  attractive  saleswide,  in  con¬ 
trast  to  the  old  concept  that  plain  "utility H  cartons  are  good  enough 
for  the  spare  parts  shelves. 


Made  recently  by  telephoning  over  500  known  set  owners  in 
the  New  York  City  area,  while  a  WCBS-TV  was  televising  the  ball  game 
between  the  Brooklyn  Dodgers  and  the  Chicago  Cubs,  a  CBS-Hooper 
survey  found  that: 

1,  More  than  six  persons  per  home  set  watch  sports  tele¬ 
vision  on  WC3S-TV. 

2,  Of  those  watching  the  telecast,  three  out  of  four  could 
identify  the  sponsor  -  Ford  Motor  Company. 

3.  Sets  tuned  for  the  game  that  night  had  an  average 
audience  of  6,26  persons,  including  3.74  men,  1.52  women  and  1.0 
children.  This  compares  with  2.5  persons  per  set  who  listen  to  radio. 

4.  Television  sets-in-use  were  54.5  per  cent,  more  than 
double  the  Hooper-June  evening  average  of  23.0  per  cent  for  radio 
sets-in-use. 


An  excited  caller  reported  that  a  flying  disc  had  become 
"tangled  in  the  television  tower"  of  Station  WN3W  in  Washington  at 
the  Wardman  Park  Hotel.  A  quick  check  with  NBC’s  television  staff 
turned  up  the  information  that  there  is  a  large  black  disk  at  the 
210  foot  level  of  the  tower,  but  it  didn’t  fly  there.  It  is  simply 
a  "radio  microwave  receiving  dish”  a  black  saucer-shaped  disc,  six 
feet  across,  used  to  pick  up  high  frequency  television  signals. 

The  dish  was  mounted  on  the  tower  this  week-end,  and  a 
similar  appearing  one  is  atop  the  National  Gallery  of  Art  in  down¬ 
town  Washington.  The  disc  on  the  Art  Gallery  is  a  transmitting 
antenna  to  be  used  in  sending  a  special  television  program  from  the 
National  Gallery  to  the  Wardman  Park  Tower  where  it  was  broadcast 
last  Saturday  night. 


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Founded  in  1924 


HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 

Radio  —  Television  —  FM  —  Communications 


2400  California  Street,  N.  W.  Washington  8,  D.  C. 


"Voice  Of  .America"  Is  Adjournment  Issue;  Benton  Out  Soon? . 1 

New  BBC  Head  Is  Housing  Authority.  . „ . .  S 

Mackay  Radio  Hits  FCC  Offering  RCA  6  Of  8  Overseas  Routes . 3 

"Hucksters"  Movie  "Scrubbed  Up  And  Polished" . . . 4 

New  Association  To  Export  Electrical  Apparatus . . . 5 

Half  Year  Radio  Set  Output  High;  FM,  TV  Above  1946  Totals . 6 

FCC  Prosecutes  Illegal  Radio.  Operators . . . 6 

Nicholas,  Farnsworth,  Raps;  Bonfig,  Zenith,  Defends,  phone  TV. . . . .  7 

A.  T.  &  T.  WI  thdraws  Coaxial  TV  Rate  Bid;  Revision  Downward  Seen,  ...9 
Ralph  At  lass  Chi  Station  Biz  Up  15$;  Time  Sales  21  % . . . 9 

WTO?— CB  Washington,  D.  C.  Outlet  Joins  FM  Parade . 10 

House  Votes  To  Discontinue  Radio  Installment  Buying  Curbs,, .......  It 

C.  Sc  0.  Applies  For  Train  Radio  Telephones . 10 

FM  Assn.  Objects  To  FCC  Calling  AM  Stations  "Standard" . 11 

Zenith  Reports  Profit;  Brickbat  For  OPA . . . 11 

Chicago  Tribune  Thanks  World  press  In  First  Net  Facsimile . 12 

Protest  Canadian  Ban  On  Newspaper  Radio  Licenses. . , .  c ............  12 

Scissors  And  Paste. . . . . . .13 

Trade  Notes . . . .  .....  . 


No. 


«\H6 


\uu. 


4  4  •  *  •  % 


•  * 


July  23,  1947 


"VOICE  OF  AMERICA"  IS  ADJOURNMENT  ISSUE;  BENTON  OUT  SOON? 


Those  fighting  to  put  the  "Voice  of  America"  on  a  perman¬ 
ent  basis  through  the  eleventh  hour  passage  of  the  Mundt  bill  were 
heartened  when  Senator  Arthur  Vandenberg  (R),  of  Michigan,  Chairman 
of  the  Senate  Foreign  Relations  Committee  said  he  would  try  to  push 
the  amended  bill  through  before  Congress  adjourns. 

Decision  to  press  for  action  in  the  few  remaining  days  of 
this  session  increased  the  belief  that  Assistant  Secretary  of  State 
Benton,  in  charge  of  the  Office  of  Information  and  Cultural  Affairs, 
would  resign  early  in  the  Fall.  From  the  start,  Secretary  Benton 
has  apparently  been  regarded  as  a  sort  of  a  "bull  in  a  china  shop" 
on  Capitol  Hill, 

When  Secretary  of  State  Marshall  made  a  final  plea  to  the 
Senate  Appropriations  Committee  for  an  additional  3  million  dollars 
for  the  program,  he  was  told  that  Benton  was  the  real  stumbling 
block. 

The  members  of  the  Appropriations  group  bluntly  said  to 
the  Secretary  that  Benton  would  have  to  go  if  the  department  hoped 
to  persuade  Congress  to  be  more  generous. 

The  Senate  Foreign  Relations  Committee  last  week  approved 
an  amended  version  of  the  House-passed  Mundt  bill  giving  the  Office 
of  Information  and  Cultural  Affairs  permai  ent  legislative  standing. 

The  Committee  recommended  that  $100,000  be  appropriated 
for  a  joint  Congressional  investigation  of  the  entire  program.  Under 
the  terms  of  the  amendment  a  joint  committee  of  five  Senators  and 
five  Representatives  would  be  oreated  to  study  "Government  informa¬ 
tion  programs",  with  a  directive  to  report  to  Congress  by  February  1. 

The  comoaratively  large  sum  suggested  for  the  investigation, 
$100,000,  would  be  needed  for  travel  expenses  in  first-hand  on-the- 
epot  inquiries  into  America* s  information  centers  in  Europe,  Asia  and 
the  Middle  East. 

An  accusing  finger  was  pointed  at  Senator  Taft  ( R) ,  of 
Ohio,  as  trying  to  prevent  the  bill*s  passage.  Says  the  Washington 
Posts 

"Senator  Taft  is  conducting  a  one-man  blockade  to  thwart 
the  Mundt  bill  which  would  give  legislative  sanction  to  the  State 
Department  foreign  information  program.  Surely  this  doe  an* t  make 
much  sense.  He  cannot  prevent  the  Voice  of  America  from  continuing. 
That  is  already  assured,  at  least  on  a  limited  scale,  by  a  rider  on 
the  State  Department  appropriation  bill.  What  he  can  do,  however, 
is  to  doom  the  program  to  the  status  of  a  bastard  child.  The  situa¬ 
tion  now  is  exactly  the  same  as  it  was  last  year  at  this  time  — 
except  that  there  is  far  greater  need  for  the  program  and  less  money 
to  meet  the  need. 


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H e i nl  Radio  News  Service 


7/23/47 


"We  hope  that  Senator  Taft  will  be  persuaded  to  relax  his 
stubborness.  W  hatever  his  own  views,  he  ought  to  have  enough  res¬ 
pect  for  the  opinions  of  his  colleagues  to  allow  the  Mundt  bill  to 
come  to  a  vote.  Anything  less  is  a  pernicious  abuse  of  democratic 
procedure.  Furthermore,  it  is  just  plain  bad  business  not  to  take 
this  small  precaution  to  protect  our  tremendous  investment  in  public 
opinion  throughout  the  world. ** 

Earlier  the  Senate* s  Republican  leadership  had  determined 
to  rest  this  session  on  the  $12,400,000  Congress  voted  in  the  State 
Department  appropriation  bili  for  the  information  and  "Voice  of 
America"  program  continuance  for  one  year. 

The  Congressional  cut  of  funds  for  the  State  Department 
information  service  and  "Voice  of  America"  from  the  budget  estimate 
of  31  million  dollars  to  £12,400,000  meant  that  nearly  half  of  this 
country* s  information  officers  had  to  come  home. 

Gen.  David  Sarnoff,  Chairman  of  the  Radio  Corporation  of 
America  in  an  address  at  Princeton  in  1946,  estimated  that  the 
broadcasting  job  alone  would  require  almost  twice  as  much  money  as 
the  $12,400,000  ear-marked  for  the  entire  program.  Said  he; 

"Tie  cost  of  doing  this  Job  effectively  is  quite  likely  to 
be  $S0, 000,000  a  year.  This  figure  is  less  than  the  amount  spent 
yearly  and  individually  by  the  British  and  the  Russians.  Indeed,  as 
time  goes  on,  the  United  States  may  find  it  necessary  to  raise  this 
figure  substantially,  if  we  are  to  match  their  world  coverage.  " 

There  is  now  available  in  printed  form  "Problems  of  Inter¬ 
national  Broadcasting"  and  "Proposals  made  for  their  solution",  tell¬ 
ing  of  General  Sarnoff*s  efforts  to  strengthen  the  "Voice  of  America" 
which  began  in  1938  with  a  conference  he  had  with  President  Roosevelt 
in  the  White  House. 

If  Congress  acts  favorably  now  on  the  Mundt  Bill,  the  way 
will  be  open  to  seek  a  deficiency  appropriation  later  if  the  world 
situation  remains  such  that  the  State  Department  ha6  to  e  xpand  its 
services. 


XXXXXXXXXX 
NEW  BBC  HEAD  IS  HOUSING  AUTHORITY 

Lord  Simon  of  Wythenshawe  new  Chairman  and  Governor  of  the 
British  Broadcasting  Corporation  is  well  known  as  an  authority  on 
housing,  and  has  written  numerous  works  on  housing  and  slum-clear¬ 
ance.  He  was  Lord  Mayor  of  Manchester  in  1921,  and  entered  Parlia¬ 
ment  two  years  later  as  Liberal  Member  for  the  Withington  Division. 

He  Joined  the  Labour  Party  last  year.  He  is  Chairman  of  the  Council 
of  Manchester  University. 

Nothing  is  said  about  Lord  Simon* s  past  experience,  if  any, 
in  the  broadcasting  field.  Lord  Simon  (formerly  Sir  Ernest  Simon) 
succeeds  Lord  Inman,  who  resigned  the  BBC  chairmanship  to  accept  the 
Cabinet  post  of  Lord  Privy  Seal  in  H.M.  Government. 

XXXXXXXXX 
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MACKAY  RADIO  HITS  FCC  OFFERINa  RCA  6  OF  8  OVERSEAS  ROUTES 


Mackay  Radio  isn!t  happy  over  the  proposal  of  the  Federal 
Communications  Commission  to  award  RCA  Communications  six  of  eight 
overseas  radio  telegraph  circuits  arranged  for  under  the  Anglo- 
American  Bermuda  Agreement.  Furthermore,  in  launching  a  vigorous 
attack:  against  the  proposal  Mackay  calls  attention  to  the  fact  that 
though  hearings  in  the  case  were  concluded  in  August  1946,  it  wasn’t 
until  ten  months  later,  June  1947,  one  day  after  receipt  at  the  FCC 
of  a  petition  from  Mackay  to  reopen  the  proceedings  to  receive  new 
evidence  that  the  Communications  Commission  issued  its  proposed 
report.  At  the  same  time  oral  arguments  on  the  report  were  scheduled 
to  be  held  before  the  Commission  Friday,  August  8th. 

The  report  proposed  to  grant  RCA  Communications  authority 
to  operate  circuits  on  a  regular  basis  with  Australia,  New  Zealand, 
India,  Greece,  Palestine  and  the  Union  of  South  Africa.  Mackay 
would  be  authorized  to  serve  Saudi  Arabia.,  and  Tropical  Radio  to 
take  care  of  Jamaica. 

Chairmen  Denny  and  Commissioner  E.  K.  Jett  dissented  from 
the  conclusions  saying  there  should  be  more  of  a  distribution  of  the 
circuits  between  RCA  Communications  and  Mackay. 

In  a  50-page  statement  of  exceptions  submitted  by  Mackay ’s 
Vice-President  and  General  Attorney  James  A.  Kennedy,  and  Assistant 
General  Attorneys  John  F.  Gibbons  and  John  A.  Hartman,  Jr. ,  they 
strongly  objected  "to  the  lack  of  basic  findings  in  the  Proposed 
Report  and  to  the  attempt,  by  comparing  the  relative  progress  in  the 
execution  of  its  modernization  plans  with  those  of  RCAC,  to  draw 
implications  unfavorable  to  Mackay  . " 

Excepting  to  the  statement  in  the  Proposed  Report,  as  a 
consideration  in  determining  the  comparative  qualifications  of  the 
carriers,  that  between  April  15,  1946,  when  hearings  in  the  proceed¬ 
ing  were  commenced,  and  August  26,  1946,  when  hearings  were  conclud¬ 
ed,  RCAC  made  more  extensive  progress  than  did  Mackay  in  the  reali¬ 
zation  of  their  respective  plans,  Mackay  representatives  took  the 
position  that  "the  Proposed  Report  assumes,  without  so  finding,  that 
it  was  both  technically  and  economically  sound  for  RCAC  to  plunge 
headlong  into  and  pursue  with  accelerated  speed  the  program  upon 
which  it  had  launched,  and  further  assumes,  without  so  finding,  that 
it  would  be  technically  and  economically  sound  for  Mackay  to  have 
done  likewise." 

Attorney  Kennedy  and  his  associates  pointed  out  that 
whereas  Mackay  expressed  atility  and  willingness  to  provide  non¬ 
telegraphic  services  such  as  radiophoto  and  program  transmission 
services,  whenever  and  wherever  the  need  therefor  existed,  the 
Proposed  Report  placed  emphasis  upon  RCAC’s  readiness  for  services 
of  this  character.  However,  in  the  proposed  grant  of  the  Kingston, 
Jamaica  circuit  to  Tropical  Radio,  the  proposed  Reoort,  while  noting 
Tropical  Radio’s  present  lack  of  equipment  for  such  services,  point- 


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ed  out  further  that  program  transmission  service  by  the  American 
Telephone  and  Telegraph  Company  was  available.  Yet,  the  Commission, 
in  dealing  with  the  possibility  of  program  transmission  requirements 
with  Australia,  New  Zealand,  India  and  South  Africa,  (as  to  which 
the  Bermuda  Agreement  is  silent).  Ignored  the  program  transmission 
services  furnished  to  those  countries  by  the  A.  T.  &  T.,  although 
the  fact  that  such  services  are  available  to  Jamaica  was  weighed  as 
a  factor  in  the  award  of  the  Jamaica  circuit  to  Tropical.  " 

Final  objections  to  the  RCA  proposed  award  were: 

a.  The  "findings"  upon  which  this  conclusion  is  based 
consists  solely  of  reiteration  of  the  claims,  allega¬ 
tions  and  contentions  of  the  parties,  or  the  absence 
thereof,  without  Commission  determination  concerning 
the  merits  of  such  claims,  allegations  and  contentions, 
and  do  not  constitute  proper  findings  upon  which  the 
conclusion  reached  can  be  based. 

b.  This  conclusion  is  based  primarily  upon  engineering 
considerations  for  which  the  record  does  not  contain 
adequate  evidentiary  support  and  concerning  which  the 
Commission  has  made  no  findings. 

c.  This  conclusion  virtually  prescribes  standards  of 
engineering  practice  and  the  institution  of  certain 
specialized  services  as  conditions  precedent  to  future 
grants  of  authorization  to  operate  in  the  internation¬ 
al  radiotelegraph  field,  although  the  Commission  has 
conducted  no  technical  studies  or  investigations  to 
determine  whether  such  standards  and  services  are  in 
the  public  interest. 

d.  The  sole  purpose  of  this  proceeding  was  to  give  ef¬ 
fect  to  the  terms  of  the  Bermuda  Agreement  for  the 
establ ishment  of  radiotelegraph  circuits  to  the  points 
involved  in  such  Agreement,  and  the  Agreement  sets 
forth  no  engineering,  operating  or  service  criteria 

as  prerequisites  to  govern  the  operation  of  the 
several  circuits. 

XXXXXXXX 

"HUCKSTERS"  MOVIE  "SCRUBBED  UP  AND  POLISHED" 

Apparently  the  moving  picture  version  of  the  "Hucksters" 
deals  more  gently  with  the  broadcasting  industry  than  the  book. 

Bosley  Crowther,  screen  critic  of  the  New  York  Times, 
writes,  in  part,  (July  18): 

"Not  to  prolong  your  anxiety,  let’s  get  it  said  right  off 
that  the  film  verions  of  ’The  Hucksters',  which  cane  to  the  Capitol 
yesterday,  is  a  considerable  re-write  of  the  original,  scrubbed  and 


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polished  with  Beautee  soap.  Virtually  all  of  the  coarseness  which 
was  in  Frederic  Wakeman’s  dubious  book  has  been  neatly  eliminated 
and  replaced  by  a  wholesome  romance.  Much  of  the  sting  in  the  sat¬ 
ire  of  the  radio  business,  which  was  the  novel’s  singular  chara, 
has  been  tempered  into  farce  comedy.  And  the  role  of  Victor  Norman 
has  been  built  up. 

"That  being  clearly  recorded  and  the  implications  absorbed, 
we  can  now  go  ahead  and  tell  you  that  the  film  is  amusing  -  but  too 
long.  And  we  can  also  carefully  warn  you  that,  unless  you  like 
Clark  Gable  very  much,  you  are  going  to  find  him  monotonous  in  this 
hour-and- fifty- five-minute  film.  " 

Richard  L.  Coe  wrote  in  the  Washington  Post,  July  19: 

"In  ’The  Hucksters’  the  Sleepy  Giant  of  the  Arts  lectures 
the  Chattering  Magpie  of  Science  on  how  to  behave  in  public.  When 
it  sticks  to  this  idea  of  the  movies  telling  off  radio,  the  Palace’s 
new  film  is  deliciously  ironic. 

"Expensively  scrubbed  for  the  movie  pudic,  Frederic  Wake- 
man’s  widely-read  yarn  now  has  a  surprising  quality  of  childlike 
innocence.  When  it  is  spoofing  radio  commercials  and  that  titan  of 
eccentric  sponsors,  Evan  Llewellyn  Evans,  or  when  it  is  solemnly 
telling  radio  to  mend  its  airways  else  the  public  will  snap  it  off, 
as  it  does  in  a  boyishly  sincere  letter  dictated  by  Clark  Gable,  it 
is  extremely  -  and  often  unconsciously  -  funny.  It  has  the  aplomb 
of  a  child  telling  a  story  he  doesn't  quite  understand,  but  which  he 
suspects  is  pretty  good. 

"You  feel  this  because  the  film  insists  on  subordinating 
the  satire,  which  was  the  essential  of  the  book,  to  True  Love  and 
its  purgative  effect  on  our  base  natures.  True,  the  book  is  no  un¬ 
alterable  classic  and  it  ran  downhill  after  its  broadsides  against 
radio  were  spent,  but  in  adapting  it  for  the  screen,  Metro  has  loadr- 
ed  it  down  with  the  very  thing  which  makes  one  most  despair  about 
movies  in  general,  Romance. " 

xxxxxxxxxx 

NEW  ASSOCIATION  TO  EXPORT  ELECTRICAL  APPARATUS 

Electrical  Manufacturers'  Export  Association  has  filed 
papers  under  the  Export  Trade  Act  ( Webb-Pomerene  Law)  with  the  Feder¬ 
al  Trade  Commission  for  exporting  electrical  apparatus.  The  Associ¬ 
ation  will  maintain  offices  at  70  pine  St.,  New  York. 

Officers  of  the  Association  are  W.  E.  Goodman,  Chairman; 

J.  R.  McFarlin,  Vice  Chairman;  Merritt  C.  Harrell,  Executive  Secre¬ 
tary;  and  Duane  E.  Akins,  Roger  A.  Black,  Edward  F.  Callahan,  Robert 
A.  Currie,  W.  E.  Goodman,  E.  F.  Hartert  an  d  J.  R.  McFarlin,  members 
of  the  Board  of  Governors, 

Members  of  the  Association  are  Electric  Service  Manufactur¬ 
ing  Co.,  Philadelphia;  Goodman  Manufacturing  Co.,  Chicago;  Inter¬ 
national  General  Electric  Co.,  Inc.,  New  York;  Westinghouse  Electric 
'rntemational  Co.,  New  York;  Jeffrey  Manufacturing  Co.,  Columbus,  Ohio ; 
Ohio  Brass  Co.,  Mansfield, Ohio;  and  Line  Material  Co.,  Milwaukee , Wis. 

XXXXXXXX  -5- 


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HALF  YEAR  RADIO  SET  OUTPUT  HI  OH;  FM,  TV  ABOVE  1946  TOTALS 


A  total  of  8,610,644  radio  and  television  receivers  were 
produced  by  RMA  member- companies  during  the  first  six  months  of 
1947  despite  a  seasonal  slack  in  June  with  FM-AM  and  television  sets 
showing  "the  greatest  gains  over  1946,  the  Radio  Manufacturers1 
Association  reported. 

More  television  receivers  were  produced  in  June  alone  than 
in  the  entire  year  1946,  while  the  half  year’s  output  of  FM-AM 
receivers  was  two  and  a  half  times  that  of  the  previous  year. 

June’s  record  output  of  11,484  television  receivers 
brought  the  half  year’s  total  to  46,389  as  compared  with  6,476  in 
the  whole  of  1946. 

A  total  of  4  45,563  FM-AM  receivers  were  produced  by  RMA 
member- companies  during  the  first  six  months  of  1947  as  compared 
with  181,485  in  1946.  June’s  output,  however,  declined  along  with 
the  entire  set  production  below  the  two  previous  months.  FM-AM 
receivers  manufactured  in  June  numbered  76,624  as  compared  with 
84,507  in  May. 

However,  total  June  set  production  dropped  to  1,213,142 
in  an  expected  seasonal  decline  as  compared  with  1,316,373  in  May. 

The  proportion  of  FM-AM  receivers  to  the  total  set  produc¬ 
tion  rose  from  1.4  to  more  than  5  percent  during  the  first  half  of 
1947.  An  RMA  survey  last  Spring  indicated  that  total  FM-AM  set 
production  in  1947  would  run  between  1.8  and  2.1  million  this  year, 
rising  sharply  during  the  last  half  of  the  year. 

Of  the  46,389  television  receivers  produced  in  the  past 
six  months,  32,769  were  table  models,  9,  229  were  consoles,  3,517 
were  radio-phonograph  combination  models,  and  874  were  converters. 

xxxxxxxx 

FCO  PROSECUTES  ILLEGAL  RADIO  OPERATORS 

Three  men  who  resorted  to  radio  transmission  in  an  effort 
to  beat  the  horseraces,  only  to  be  apprehended  by  Federal  Communica¬ 
tions  Commission  field  agents,  have  been  sentenced  for  violating 
the  Communications  Act  which  prohibits  illegal  radio  operation. 

In  Florida,  John  A.  Campbell  was  convicted  by  a  Federal 
court  jury  of  transmitting  without  allcense  and  received  a  sentence 
of  six  months  in  jail  and  afine  of  $500,  but  appealed.  He  figured 
in  the  Hialeah  racetrack  case  of  l?st  March  in  which  transmitting 
apparatus  relayed  tips  to  distant  bettors. 

In  California,  Edgar  M.  Smith  and  Kenneth  McCrea  were  each 
fined  $500  and  placed  on  probation  for  aperiod  of  five  years.  They 
were  tdt  en  into  custody  at  the  Santa  Anitatrack ,  also  in  March,  in 
connection  with  the  operation  of  a  transmitter  concealed  beneath 
clothing  in  a  like  e  ffort  to  ’’beat  the  bookies”.  The  Commission  has 
taken  steps  to  suspend  the  commercial  radio  operator  licenses  held 
by  both  of  these  men. 

-  6  - 


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NICHOLAS,  FARNSWORTH,  RAPS;  BONFIG,  ZENITH,  DEFENDS,  PHONE  TV 


There  was  a  spirited  exchange  this  week  between  E.  A. 
Nicholas,  president  of  the  Farnsworth  Television  and  Radio  Corpora¬ 
tion  and  H.  C.  Bonflg,  Vice-President  of  Zenith  over  the  latter 
company* s  proposed  "pay-as-you-see  "  system  of  receiving  television 
broadcasts  over  the  telephone  instead  of  by  radio. 

Addressing  a  national  convention  of  Farnsworth  distribut¬ 
ors  in  Chicago,  Mr.  Nicholas  said,  HThe  American  people  are  accust¬ 
omed  to  the  radio  way.  They  expect  to  turn  on  their  receivers  as 
they  choose,  and  to  enjoy  any  program  they  choose. 

"They  do  not  pay  a  tax;  they  drop  no  nickels  in  slots; 
they  receive  no  bills  from  anyone.  They  expect  the  same  of  televi¬ 
sion,  and  they  are  going  to  get  the  same  of  television. " 

Mr.  Nicholas  labeled  proposers  of  the  system  which  would 
require  set  owners  to  pay  for  part  of  their  television  entertain¬ 
ment  "chronic  doubters  who  have  constantly  sought  to  talk  down 
television  progress.  " 

"If  such  a  system  were  technically  possible  on  a  national 
scale  -  which  few  agree  that  it  is  -  who  would  hold  this  dictatorial 
power  over  your  reception?"  Mr.  Nicholas  went  on  to  say.  "What 
manner  of  giant  monopoly  would  this  create?" 

Mr.  Nicholas  saw  a  pay- for-your-pro gram  system  as  giving 
the  set  owner  less  for  the  price  of  his  receiver. 

"After  paying  for  his  receiver",  Mr.  Nicholas  said,  "the 
owner  would  have  to  pay  again  and  again  to  use  it.  His  cost  would 
be  a  continuing  cost,  unless  he  were  content  to  receive  only  those 
programs  which  the  broadcasters  felt  obliged  to  give  him  free  of 
charge. 

"Advertisers  are  showing  their  confidence  in  the  American 
way  of  television",  he  said.  "Sixtv-two  advertisers,  including  many 
of  the  nation* s  largest  companies,  are  now  sponsoring  television 
programs.  Only  a  short  month  ago  that  number  was  46.  So  we  have 
had  an  increase  of  16  in  30  days  -  or  33  per  cent. 

".And  during  the  same  time  there  was  a  seasonal  decline  in 
sponsorship  of  regular  radio  programs.  Does  this  sound  as  if  we  need 
a.  new  system  whereby  the  set  owner  buys  his  program?" 

"Scoffing  at  predictions  that  pay- as- you- see  service  would 
slow  down  development  of  television,  Mr.  Bonfig  said  Zenith  develop¬ 
ment  of  a  pay-as-you- see- system  was  the  one  thing  needed  to  lift 
television  from  the  doldrums  in  which  it  has  languished  for  many 
years.*  *  * 

"Phone  vision",  Mr.  Bonfig  said,  "instead  of  competing 
with  ordinary  television,  is  an  added  service  of  great  value  to 

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He ini  Radio  News  Service 


7/83/47 


both  the  public  and  the  television  industry,  phone  vision  sets 
will  receive  all  television  programs  broadcast  in  the  conventional 
manner,  just  like  any  other  receiver,  n 

Mr,  Sonfig  stated  that  public  response  to  the  announcement 
of  phone  vision  had  been  terrific.  “We  received  thousands  of 
telephone  calls”,  he  said,  ”from  people  who  wanted  this  new  service 
now.  The  Illinois  Bell  Telephone  Company  and  Commonwealth  Edison 
were  likewise  swamped  with  similar  calls.  The  public  has  already 
demonstrated  that  it  is  willing  and  eager  to  pay  for  finer  televi¬ 
sion  programming  than  can  be  presented  by  advertisers.  “ 

Mr,  Bonfig  said  that  the  only  really  popular  television 
programs  available  today  are  sports  events.  New  movies  are  unavail¬ 
able  for  television  he  said  because  their  production  costs,  in  some 
cases  exceeding  one  million  dollars  per  hour,  put  them  beyond  reach 
of  advertisers. 

Phone  vision,  he  said,  by  presenting  these  costly  enter¬ 
tainment  features  in  addition  to  ordinary  television,  will  greatly 
stimulate  the  sale  of  sets,  and  in  turn  aid  the  development  of 
ordinary  television.  He  pointed  out  that  Zenith  stands  ready  to 
license  any  qualified  manufacturer  to  produce  phone  vision  receivers, 
and  said  that  interest  in  the  industry  is  keen. 

”The  public  will  insist  on  phone  vision”,  he  stated,  “be¬ 
cause  it  will  bring  them  two  great  tele  vision  s ervices  instead  of 
Just  one. ” 


An  editorial  in  the  New  York  Times  (July  23)  entitled, 

“Pay  As  You  See”  reads  in  part: 

“There  is  no  technical  difficulty  in  carrying  out  the  idea 
of  receiving  on  the  telephone  set  in  the  living  room  some  frequenc¬ 
ies  which  come  directly  through  the  ether  from  the  transmitting 
station  and  others  by  wire  at  aprlce.  The  proposal  is  ingenious. 

You  pay  only  for  what  you  want  to  see  and  not  for  a  ’commercial1 
that  mnoys  because  it  is  wedged  in  Just  when  the  heroine  of  a  melo¬ 
drama  is  about  to  f  ace  death.  *  *  *  * 

“Commander  McDonald  rightly  points  out  that  television 
could  be  paid  for  just  as  we  pay  for  telephoning.  Hollywood* s  ex¬ 
perience  is  here  enlightening.  Translated  into  terms  of  running 
time,  a  film  play  may  cost  from  $1,500  to  $40,000  a  minute,  with 
$1,500  representing  about  the  worst  that  the  public  will  tolerate, 

“If  we  are  to  have  every  day  a  new  full  length  television 
comedy  or  tragedy  lasting  an  hour  and  a  half  (British  experience 
indicates  that  ’shorts’  are  not  so  popular)  the  studios  will  incur 
a  staggering  outlay.  Whole  acres  must  be  given  over  to  ’lots*  on 
which  half  a  dozen  companies  are  rehearsing  for  coming  productions. 
An  army  of  artisans  must  be  kept  busy  preparing  sets.  Even  at  the 
average  rate  of  only  $15,000  a  minute  the  director  must  reckon  with 
an  expenditure  of  about  a  million  if  each  day  only  a  single  full- 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/23/47 


length  play  is  to  be  presented  with  the  opulence  to  which  we  are 
accustomed.  And  if  each  of  the  twelve  channels  assigned  by  the 
Federal  Communications  Commission  to  television  transmits  plays  for 
six  hours  a  day  the  outlay  is  terrifying.  Commander  McDonald* s  est¬ 
imated  $10,000,000  a  year  6eems  much  too  modest.  But  whether  or  not 
he  has  solved  the  biggest  problem  in  television  he  has  given  the 
telephone  and  broadcasting  companies  something  to  think  about,  B 

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A.T.&  T.  WITHDRAWS  COAXIAL  TV  RATE  BID;  REVISION  DOWNWARD  SEEN 

As  had  been  anticipated  because  of  complaints  from  the 
industry  that  they  were  too  high,  the  American  Telephone  &  Telegraph 
Company  last  Monday,  July  21,  withdrew  schedules  for  proposed  rates 
Jnteroity  coaxial  cable  television  program  transmission  services 
which  were  to  have  become  effective  August  1st.  The  withdrawal  not¬ 
ice  to  tne  Commission  gave  no  reason  for  the  action,  but  said  the 
action  was  taken  "without  prejudice"  to  the  filing  of  new  schedules 
aL  a  later  date. 


It  seemed  to  be  the  opinion  at  the  Federal  Communications 
Commission  that  the  forthcoming  rate  proposals  would  be  consider¬ 
ably  lower  than  those  first  proposed.  Allen  B.  Dumont,  the  Televi¬ 
sion  Broadcasters*  Association,  and  others  have  filed  objections  to 
the  rates  originally  proposed  by  A.  T.  &  T. 

A,  T.  &  T.  *  s  coaxial  cable  has  been  used  for  some  time  for 
relaying  television  broadcasts  between  New  York  and  Washington,  D.  C. 
the  service  being  provided  by  A.  T.  &  T.  without  charge  while  the 
operation  was  on  an  experimental  basis.  The  coaxial  oabie  is  an 
underground  multiple  cable  capable  of  carrying  numerous  telephone 
conversations  and  television  relays  in  two  directions  simultaneously. 

,  .  ^  In  New  York,  a  statement  by  the  company  said  the  action 

in  witndrawing  the  proposed  tariffs  was  taken  to  "permit  further 
studies  of  the  technical  problems". 


Present  experimental  television  service  over  the  New  York- 
Wasnington  coaxial  cable  "will  be  continued  until  final  tariffs  are 
filed",  the  company  said. 


XXXXXXXXXX 


RALPH  ATLASS  CHI  STATION  BIZ  UP  15 $;  TIME  SALES  21$ 

Revenue  of  WIND,  Chicago,  independent  station,  which  Ralph 
L.  Atlass  heads,  has  shown  a  marked  increase  of  15.2$  for  the  first 
six  months  of  1947  over  the  same  period  in  1946,  with  time  sales 
currently  running  at  increased  rate  of  21.3$,  it  has  been  announced 
by  John  Carey,  station  sales  manager. 

Commenting  on  figures,  Mr.  Carey  stated  that  trend  in 
commercial  copy  is  toward  pre-war,  hard  merchandise  selling  and  that 
advertisers  are  watching  expenditures  with  Increasing  care. 

XXXXXXXX 
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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


7/23/47 


wtop-cbs  Washington,  d.  c.  outlet  joins  m  parade 


Station  WTOP,  Washington  outlet  for  the  Columbia  Broad¬ 
casting  System,  wa6  granted  a  permit  for  an  FM  station  in  the 
Capital,  Carl  Burkland,  Station  Manager,  said  this  week.  Mr. 

Burkland  added  that  station  engineers  will  soon  begin  engineering 
experiments  with  mobile  equipment  to  determine  the  location  of  the 
transmitter. 

The  authorization  brings  the  number  granted  in  the  District 
to  12  -  the  total  set  aside  for  Washington  by  the  Federal  Communica¬ 
tions  Commission.  Five  FM  stations  are  now  on  the  air. 

xxxxxxxx 

HOUSE  VOTES  TO  DISCONTINUE  RADIO  INSTALLMENT  BUYING  CURBS 

The  House  voted  yesterday,  the  22nd,  to  strip  the  Admin¬ 
istration  of  all  authority  to  control  installment  buying.  The 
measure  proposed  to  end  immediately  the  restraints  on  credit  pur¬ 
chases  of  such  things  as  automobiles,  refrigerators  and  radios. 

The  Senate  had  approved  a  bill  to  continue  the  controls  in 
modified  form  to  December  31st,  but  the  House  rejected  this  and  sent 
its  own  measure  to  the  Senate. 

The  controls  require  one-third  down  payments,  with  install¬ 
ments  running  no  more  than  15  months. 

Since  President  Truman  has  advised  Congress  he  will  lift 
the  controls  imposed  in  wartime  -  unless  Congress  gives  him  peace¬ 
time  authority  -  Tuesday's  House  action  pointed  directly  toward  an 
early  end  of  ell  installment-buying  regulations. 

XXXXXXXX 

C.  &  0.  APPLIES  FOR  TRAIN  RADIO  TELEPHONES 

The  Chesapeake  &  Ohio  Railway  Co.  on  Tuesday  filed  the 
first  application  with  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  for 
authority  to  set  up  public  toll  telephone  service  on  its  moving 
trains.  The  railroad  said  it  plans  to  inaugurate  the  service  on  tvo 
trains  between  Washington  and  Cincinnati,  Ohio.  The  plan  involves 
construction  by  the  railroad  of  its  own  telephone  lines  along  the 
right  of  w  ay. 

The  C.  &  0.  proposes  to  set  up  these  telephone  lines  par¬ 
allel  to  its  tracks.  Conversations  will  involve  a  30-foot  radio 
span  between  the  side  of  the  car  and  the  telephone  wires.  For  out¬ 
going  calls,  passengers  will  dial  the  operator,  and  the  call  signal, 
picked  up  by  the  telephone  wires,  will  be  received  at  the  nearest 
regular  telephone  exchange.  In©  raing  calls  will  be  relayed  through 
booster  stations  to  be  established  along  the  right  of  way, 

XXXXXXXX 
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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/23/47 


FM  ASSN.  OBJECTS  TO  FCC  CALLING  AM  STATIONS  "STANDARD" 


Objection  to  use  by  the  Federal  Coraraunicat Ions  Commission 
of  the  term  "standard"  when  reference  is  made  to  AM  radio  stations 
was  made  in  a  letter  from  J.  N.  Bailey,  Executive  Director  of  the 
FM  Association  to  the  Federal  Communications  Commission. 

"In  view  of  the  definite  superiority  from  an  engineering 
standpoint  of  FM  broadcast  service",  Mr.  Bailey  wrote,  "and  based 
upon  FM*s  present  growth,  it  is  apparent  that  the  number  of  stations 
in  operation  in  the  FM  band  shortly  will  equal  and  soon  will  exceed 
the  number  licensed  in  the  AM  band.  " 

"Thus  it  appears",  he  continued,  "that  FM  will  become  the 
accepted  system  of  broadcasting  and  AM  will  eventually  become  obsol¬ 
ete.  Inasmuch  as  the  term  Standard1  is  applied  to  that  which  is 
accepted  generally  by  the  public,  and  since  the  present  trend  indi¬ 
cates  that  within  a  comparatively  short  space  of  time  FM  will  become 
the  accepted  method  of  broadcasting,  the  FM  Association  objects  to 
the  terminology  in  the  proposed  Commission  forms  insofar  as  these 
forms  identify  AM  broadcasting  as  'standard1.  As  an  alternative, 
we  respectfully  submit  that  the  forms  should  designate  AM  as  f AM 
(amplitude  modulation)1." 


xxxxxxxxxx 

ZENITH  REPORTS  PROFIT;  BRICKBAT  FOR  OPA 

The  Zenith  Radio  Corporation  and  its  subsidiaries  are 
operating  in  the  black  in  the  first  three  months  of  the  fiscal  year 
that  began  on  May  1. 

"A  year  ago  we  were  running  into  substantial  losses  on 
production  of  automobile  radios,  resulting  in  a  net  loss  of  £649,  649 
for  the  six  months  ended  October  31,  1936",  E.  F.  McDonald,  President, 
declared.  "At  one  time  we  were  losing  £5  to  £6  on  every  car  radio 
we  delivered.  As  soon  as  OPA  went  out  of  business  we  were  able  to 
raise  our  prices  25  per  cent  with  no  complaints. " 

He  explained  that  the  company  continued  to  produce  auto¬ 
mobile  radios  at  a  loss  because  Zenith  was  the  only  supplier  for 
Ford,  Lincoln,  Nash,  Hudson  end  Willys.  He  told  shareholders  to 
consider  the  good-will  the  company  had  been  able  to  build  up  with 
these  manufacturers  and  added:  "The  automobile  business  is  one  where 
saturation  will  never  be  reached.  It  insures  us  a  good  car  radio 
market.  We  have  had  to  refuse  the  car  radio  business  offered  by 
such  other  companies  as  Packard,  Chrysler,  Kaiser- Frazer  and  DiamondT 
and  International  Harvester  trucks.  " 

XXXXXXXXXX 


11  - 


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7/23/47 


CHICAGO  TRIBUNE  THANKS  WORLD  PRESS  IN  FIRST  NET  FACSIMILE 


A  message  of  thanks  to  the  press  of  the  world  extended 
by  the  Chicago  Tribune  last  week  read: 

"More  than  10  million  readers  in  46  countries  and  terri¬ 
tories  outside  the  United  States  got  a  look  at  the  front  page  of 
the  Centennial  issue  of  the  Chicago  Tribune  at  almost  the  same  hour 
Chicagoans  pored  over  this  newspaper* s  100th  birthday  number. 

"This  almost  instantaneous  dissemination  was  made  possible 
by  twin  milestones  in  world  Journalistic  history.  First  was  the 
international  cooperation  of  80  leading  newspapers  in  52  capitals 
and  principal  cities  of  foreign  nations  and  American  territories,  56 
of  which  already  are  known  to  have  reproduced  the  Tribune’s  Page  One. 

"Second  was  the  unique  feat  of  news  transmission  created 
to  commemorate  the  Tribune* s  100th  birthday  -  the  first  international 
news-facsimile  network  in  history.  By  wirephoto  and  telephoto  net¬ 
works,  and  by  radio  facsimile  from  New  York  and  San  Francisco  sta¬ 
tions,  the  reproduction  of  the  Tribune's  front  page  was  flashed 
across  the  country  and  throughout  the  world. " 

XXXXXXXX 

PROTEST  CANADIAN  BAN  ON  NEWSPAPER  RADIO  LICENSES 

Following  a  recent  report  by  the  Canadian  Broadcasting 
Commission  that  no  more  licenses  would  be  issued  to  newspapers, 
the  Canadian  Daily  Newspapers  Association  presented  a  brief  to  the 
Radio  Committee  of  the  House  of  Commons  which  held  that  it  was 
essential  that  this  discrimination  be  removed  because  of  the  immin¬ 
ent  introduction  of  facsimile  which  may  make  it  necessary  for  news¬ 
papers  to  o?n  radio  stations  to  stay  in  business. 

"This  ruling  is  not  by  virtue  of  any  provision  in  any 
statute  or  regulation  dealing  with  broadcasting",  said  the  brief. 

It  is  an  arbitrary  decision  of  the  governors  which  is  unwarranted, 
unfair  and  contrary  to  the  public  interest.  " 

The  brief  went  on: 

"If  radio  licenses  are  refused  to  newspapers  on  the  grounds 
that  monopolies  must  be  avoided  at  all  cost,  the  very  possible,  if 
not  the  probable,  result  will  be  a  monopoly  of  news  in  the  hands  of 
people  without  the  standards  and  the  experience  of  newspaper  pub¬ 
lishers,  and  the  disappearance  of  the  press  as  we  know  it  today, 
with  all  that  may  mean  not  only  in  injury  to  the  public  interest, 
but  in  the  loss  of  millions  of  dollars  of  capital  investment,  mil¬ 
lions  of  dollars  of  taxable  revenue  and  thousands  of  Jobs. " 

XXXXXXXX 


12 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


7/23/47 


! ! :  SCISSORS  AND  PASTE  :  : 


press  Must  Act  CUickly  For  Newsgathering  Frequencies 

(Jeremiah  Courtney,  Washington  Attorney.  Formerly  with 

FCC,  writing  in  "Editor  and  Publisher") 

Broadened  used  of  radio  now  available  for  news  gathering 
furnishes  another  proof  of  the  old  adage  that  it’s  an  ill  wind  that 
blows  no  good.  For  25  years  progress  in  radio  research  was  crowded 
into  the  war  years,  according  to  Commissioner  E.  K.  Jett  of  the 
Federal  Communications  Commission,  formerly  the  agency* s  Chief  Engi- 
need,  And,  as  a  result,  there  are  radio  frequencies  available  for 
non- broadcast  use  today  that  might  not  have  been  tapped  for  many 
ye  ars  to  come. 

Not  the  least  of  the  beneficiaries  of  this  wartime  research 
are  the  newspapers  and  press  associations.  For  these  organizations 
today  have  a  supply  of  frequencies  that  may  be  used  for  two-way  radio 
communications  between  the  editor’s  desk  and  the  reporter’s  car,  four 
of  these  frequencies  being  located  in  the  choice  portion  of  the  radio 
spectrum  between  158-162  megacycles  and  ideally  suited  for  communi¬ 
cations  of  15-20  miles  coverage  in  metropolitan  areas. 

*«**•**•» 

Although  the  rapid  growth  in  use  of  two-way  radio  by  the 
newspaper  industry  is  foreordained  under  the  broadened  scope  of  com¬ 
munication  now  permitted,  nevertheless  a  word  of  warning  may  not  be 
amiss.  If  newspapers  and  press  associations  are  to  keep  the  frequen¬ 
cies  now  available  for  their  purposes,  there  is  little  time  to  be 
lost.  Unless  two-way  radio  is  used  for  newspaper  and  press  associa¬ 
tion  work,  the  FCC  cannot  be  expected  to  reserve  frequencies  in  the 
crowded  spectrum  for  a  service  that  does  not  demonstrate  its  needs 
and  the  contributions  made,  through  use  to  the  public  Interest,  which 
is  the  touchstone  of  all  frequency  allocations. 

An  ever  increasing  group  of  interests  is  discovering  the 
efficiency  and e conomy  of  two-way  radio  and  the  demand  for  frequen¬ 
cies  is  now  far  in  excess  of  the  supply  for  certain  categories  of 
users.  Unless  newspaper  and  press  association  begin  to  use  radio  on 
a  much  more  extensive  basis  than  formerly,  they  may  in  time  find  them¬ 
selves  precluded  from  such  use  in  consequence  of  the  rigorous  compet¬ 
ition  for  frequencies  now  prevailing. 


The  Man  Behind  Television  By  Telephone 
(From  an  article  wTwo  Fisted  Dreamer”  by  Ted  Leitzell  in 
the  '’American  Weekly”  of  July  13th) 

Gene  McDonald  has  won  another  fight.  The  two-fisted 
dreamer  who  gained  a  decision  over  a  bgl  ky  machine  shop  file  at  the 
cost  of  a  pair  of  blistered  hands,  when  he  was  16  has  Ju6t  subdued 
television,  problem  child  of  radio  and  is  r  eady  to  bring  it  into 
.America*  s  living  room  wearing  its  company  manners.  Which  means 
first-run  movies,  Broadway  plays  and  -  no  commercials. 

McDonald,  who  has  fought  monopolies,  bureaucracies,  physi¬ 
cal  handicaps  end  the  elements  while  climbing  from  nachinist  *  s 


13  - 


J  u 


Heinl  Radi o  News  Se rvice 


7/23/47 


apprentice  to  the  presidency  of  the  Zenith  Radio  Corporation  with 
a  personal  fortune  of  millions,  never  did  feel  pessimistic  about 
television,  or  its  future. 

Years  ago  he  summed  up  the  situation: 

"Televisionaries  think  we  can  pay  for  television  the  same 
way  we  paid  for  radio.  They  are  wrong.  The  public  will  demand 
programs  equal  to  the  movies  in  entertainment  value,  and  that  will 
cost  more  money  than  advertisers  can  afford  to  pay.  Until  they  get 
it,  television  will  be  a  colossal  flop,  " 

3ut  the  televisionaries  went  ahead  anyway,  several  times. 
Each  time  their  boomlets  flopped.  After  each  collapse  McDonald  said: 
"There's  nothing  wrong  with  television  that  money  won't 

cure,  # 


Well,  then,  he  reasoned,  why  not  let  the  consumer  pay  for 
it?  Mr.  end  Mrs.  Citizen  pay  to  see  movies  at  the  theatre.  Let 
them  pay  to  see  similar  entertainment  in  their  living  room. «  *  *  *  * 

Cost  of  the  service  is  added  to  his  telephone  bill  at 
the  end  of  the  month, *  *  # 

Those  who  own  phone  vision  sets  but  are  unwilling  to  pay 
for  the  key  signal  service  will  still  be  able  to  see  things  on  their 
screens,  but  the  distorted  masses  on  view  won't  be  comprehensible. 
They  will,  however,  be  abL  e  to  see  all  of  the  free  television  pro¬ 
grams  that  are  regularly  broadcast. 

With  the  consumer  footing  the  bill,  instead  of  the  sponsor, 
commercials  will  be  unnecessary. 


Possibility  Of  Home  TV  Hurting  Movie  Theatres  Seen 

C*  Variety ") 

Television  might  some  day  take  acut  out  of  the  gate  re¬ 
ceipts  of  sports  events  and  film  theatres,  if  the  type  of  crowds 
watching  baseball  games,  fights  and  other  events  on  tele  screens  in 
New  York  neighborhood  bars  is  any  indication. 

Survey  conducted  this  week  by  Variety  reveals  that  the 
majority  of  lookers  in  the  neighborhood  cafes  are  regular  customers 
who  spend  their  evenings  before  the  screens  in  their  favorite  bars. 
Fact  that  many  of  these  are  young  couples  who  would  almost  certain¬ 
ly  attend  a  nabe  fllmery  otherwise  shows  how  tele  has  caught  on  to 
the  potential  detriment  of  nabe  box  offices.  And  statements  by 
inveterate  sports  addicts  to  the  effect  that  they'd  much  rather  watch 
a  ball  game  in  the  cool  comfort  of  a  bar,  where  they  can  sip  a  few 
beers  inexpensively,  rather  than  buck  the  crowds  to  pay  admission 
at  the  gate,  indicates  that  snorts  promoters  also  feel  tele's  bite, 

xxxxxxxxxx 

luring  the  recent  eclipse  of  the  sun,  the  Argentine  Naval 
Communications  Service  conducted  experiments  with  the  cooperation  of 
Argentine  amateur  radio  operators  to  determine  the  effects  of  sun¬ 
light  on  radio  waves  in  the  ionosphere.  The  results  of  the  experi¬ 
ments  have  not  been  announced.  The  experiments  were  to  consist  of 
transmitting  radio  waves  both  across  and  within  the  shadow  of  the 
eclipse  in  order  to  study  the  differences  in  reception  caused  by  the 
absence  of  sunlight  in  the  ionosphere. 

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7/23/47 


•  •  «  • 

iii?  trade  notes 

:  s: s 


•  •  • 


The  four  networks  will  seek  to  arrange  duplication  of  net¬ 
work  AM  musical  programs  on  FM  radio  stations,  network  representa¬ 
tives  reported  to  the  Bnployee- Employer  Relations  Committee  Monday. 
The  latter  Committee,  holding  sessions  at  NAB  headquarters  in  Wash¬ 
ington  on  labor  legislation,  endorsed  the  report  of  the  networks  by 
.re solution  and  urged  them  to  proceed  with  the  plan  "as  quickly  as 
possible  H. 


Cody  pfanstlehl,  formerly  of  the  publicity  staff  of  Warner 
Brothers  Theatres  in  Washington,  D.  C. ,  becomes  Director  of  Press 
Information  for  WT0P-C3S,  succeeding  Carl  Gebhur  who  moves  to  the 
Sales  Department  under  Maurice  B.  Mitchell. 

A  member  of  the  Press  Relations  staff  at  the  University  of 
Chicago  before  the  war,  Mr.  Pfanstlehl  served  four  years  in  the 
Array  Air  Forces.  For  three  months  after  his  discharge,  he  was 
announcer  and  special  events  man  for  WFBC  in  Greenville,  S.  C. 

Farnsworth  Television  &  Radio  Corporation  in  its  annual 
report  to  stockholders  announced  a  net  loss  of  $435,748,  after  Feder¬ 
al  tax  credit  carrybacks,  for  the  year  ended  April  30,  1947,  compared 
with  net  profits  of  $401,189  for  the  pre-vious  year. 

Demanding  an  inquiry  because  the  British  Broadcasting  Corp¬ 
oration  broadcast  a  bullfight,  George  Bernard  Shaw  indignantly  wrote 
to  the  editor  of  a  London  newspsper: 

nIn  a  bullfight  an  innocent  animal  is  driven  into  an  arena, 
where  it  is  goaded,  tormented  and  infuriated  until  it  is  exhausted, 
in  which  pitiable  condition  it  is  murdered  by  a  swordsman  splendidly 
attired,  giving  himself  the  airs  of  triumphing  in  a  fair  fight  with  a 
dangerous  bull. 

ttIn  my  early  days  England  was  proud  of  having  abolished 
bear-baiting  and  all  such  savageries,  and  made  bullfighting  a  nation¬ 
al  reproach  to  Spain.  But  now* ” 

Shaw  demanded  a  public  inquiry  into  the  mental  condition 

of  BBC. 


To  provide  space  for  Improved  service  to  its  radio  dealers 
and  for  the  expansion  of  its  M-G-M  record  distribution,  Zenith  Radio 
Distributing  Corporation  recently  purchased  the  two-story  and  base¬ 
ment  building  at  918-22  Washington  Blvd. ,  Chicago,  Hugh  Robertson, 
Executive  Vice-President  and  Treasurer  of  Zenith  Radio  Corporation, 
announced  Monday. 

Mr.  Robertson  said  that  the  continued  demand  for  Zenith 
radios  and  the  rapid  growth  of  its  recently  acquired  record  business 
made  the  distributing  corporation* s  facilities  at  680  North  Michigan 
Avenue  inadequate.  This  buildirg  will  be  retained  as  a  display  salon 
for  both  Zenith  radios  and  Zenith  hearing  aids,  as  well  as  a  service 
and  a  saLes  outlet  for  hearing  aid  batteries  and  accessories. 


15 


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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/23/47 


Contents  of  the  July  Issue  of  Radio  Me  published  by  the 
Information  Division  of  RCA,  include  "Outlook  for  the  Radio 
Industry ",  by  Brig.  Gen.  David  Sarnoff:  "Uses  of  Television"  by 
No ran  E.  Kersta,  an  illustrated  description  of  RCA  Exhibition  Hall 
in  Radio  City,  and  "Plane~to~ Shore  Message  Service  Opened". 

- - -  and  former  radio 

Powel  Crosley,  Jr.,  Cincinnati  autoraobile/manufacturer 
said  Monday  he  was  negotiating  for  the  purchase  of  historic  Bull 
island  in  the  Atlantic  Ocean,  about  fifteen  miles  south  of  Savannah, 
Ga-  The  island  is  about  seven  miles  long  and  four  miles  wide,  Mr. 
Crosley  said,  with  about  2,000  acres  of  land  above  high  tide. 


Sam  Norris,  associated  with  .Amperex  Electronic  Corporation, 
Brooklyn,  N,  Y. ,  since  1929,  has  been  electee  Executive  Vice-presi¬ 
dent. 

The  expanding  Amperex  line  will  include  new  tubes  for  FM 
broadcasting. 


Three  specialists  in  television  have  Joined  Richard  W# 
Huobell  and  Associates,  television  consultants,  the  firm  announces. 
Dr.  Alfred  Norton  Goldsmith,  former  RCA  Vice  president,  will  concen¬ 
trate  on  engineering  and  research,  policy  an d  management,  continuing 
his  regular  consulting  practice.  Thomas  H.  Hutchinson,  formerly 
with  Ruthrauff  and  Ryan  and  RKO  Television,  will  specialize  in  uro¬ 
gram  production  and  station  problems.  Philip  Booth,  formerly  with 
CjS  Television,  London  Films  and  Westchester  Playhouse,  will  concen¬ 
trate  on  program  structures  and  personnel  training. 

The  Stewart-Warner  Corp.  has  appointed  the  National  Ra dio 
and  Television  Service  of  Washington,  D.  C. ,  and  the  Arlington 
Television  Laboratories  under  the  company1 s  service  and  installation 
plan  for  its  television  receivers  in  the  Capital. 


James  L.  Fly,  former  Chairman  of  the  Federal  Communications 
Commission,  who  has  been  arbitrating  issues  between  the  American 
Communications  Association,  CIO,  and  operators,  awarded  wage  increas¬ 
es  Tuesday  to  radio  officers  aboard  East  and  Gulf  Coast  tankers, 
raising  their  monthly  pay  from  £230.75  to  £288.45.  The  award  provid¬ 
ed  that  £25  of  the  increase  should  be  retroactive  to  Sept.  26,  1946, 
and  also  increased  the  overtime  rate  from  $1.25  to  $1,60  an  hour. 


Nineteen  cabinet  variations  of  the  12  model  line  were  pre¬ 
viewed  by  distributors  of  Westinghouse  in  Atlanta  Tuesday  in  the 
first  of  a  series  of  meetings  to  be  held  throughout  the  United  States. 
The  line  includes  five  consoles,  five  table  models,  a  consolette,  and 
a  new  portable,  Edgar  G.  Herrmann,  Sales  Manager,  explained  that 
while  prices  had  not  been  firmly  set,  they  will  rsnge  from  $37  to 
$600. 

Mr.  Hermann  said  the  special  new  Westinghouse  FM  circuit 
is  incorporated  in  all  consoles  and  one  table  model.  He  did  not 
reveal  technical  details,  since  a  patent  is  pending,  but  he  pointed 
out  that  the  new  circuit  results  in  improved  tuning  characteristics 
and  reduces  to  a  minimum  noise  and  distortion  of  broadcast  signal. 

Although  no  television  receivers  were  shown,  Mr.  Herrmann 
said  the  development  of  the  first  set  is  completed  and  Westinghouse 
will  market  a  new  television  receiver. 

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Founded  in  1924 


HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 


Radio  —  Television  —  FM 


2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 


Robert  D.  Heinl,  Editor 


Communications 


Washington  8,  D.  C. 


INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  JULY  30,  1947 


CE 


IPAi^Mf] 


Jones  Leaving  Congress  For  FCC  Touches  Off  Great  Lovefest . 1 

FCC  Investigating  Local  Power  Lines  "Wire  dr- Wire  less  " . 3 

Power  Lines  People  Also  Inquire  About  "Pay  As  You  See”  TV. . 5 

WDAY  Free  Non-partisan  Service  To-  Congressmen  Makes  Hit... . 6 

Sylvania  Sales  Increase  69  per  Cent  In  First  Half  Of  1947 . 7 

CBS  Chairman  Marries  Former  Barbara  Cushing  Of  Boston . ’//.? 

Storer-pyan  Pass  20th  Milestone;  Look  Forward  To  Next  20 . 8 

Stronger  Anti-Liquor  Advertising  Bill  Considered  By  Senate . 9 

Vigilant  Press  praised  By  Jess  Willard,  NAB  V-p . 9 

More  "Voice  of  America"  programs  To  Rissia;  Fewer  Elsewhere . 10 

Survey  shows  Radio  Sets  Cheaper  Than  10  Years  Ago . 10 

Ethridge  Ends  UN  Chore;  Returns  To  Radio,  Newspaper  Duties . .11 

American  Forum  Of  The  Air  praised  In  Congress./. . 11 

FBI  Objects  To  Title  For  New  WOR  Series .  12 


U.  S.  Television  Passes  1000th  3ig-Screen  Tele  Projection  Set../l2 

Scissors  And  Paste .  ]_5 

Trade  Notes .  ic 


No. 


Ml  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  Inc. 

general  library 


July  30,  1947 


JONES  LEAVING  CONGRESS  FOR  FCC  TOUCHES  OFF  GREAT  LOVEFEST 


Old  timers  rubbed  their  eyes  at  the  ovation  participated 
in  by  Republicans  and  Democrats  alike,  which  Representative  Robert  F* 
Jones  (R),  of  Ohio,  received  in  the  House  last  Friday  when  Speaker 
Joe  Martin  presented  the  former* s  resignation.  Representative  Jones 
had  just  been  appointed  by  President  Truman  to  a  term  of  seven  years 
on  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  to  succeed  Commissioner 
Ray  C.  WaJcefield  of  California,  whose  re-nomination  was  subsequently 
withdrawn. 

Representative  Thomas  A.  Jenkins  (R),  dean  of  the  Ohio 
delegation  was  the  first  to  get  to  his  feet  when  Speaker  Martin 
read  Mr.  Jones*  formal  letter  of  resignation.  Said  he: 

uIt  is  with  a  deep  sense  of  personal  loss  that  I  contem¬ 
plate  the  resignation  of  my  very  good  friend,  Robert  F.  Jones.  When 
he  came  to  Congress  he  was  one  of  the  youngest  Members,  and  although 
he  has  been  in  Congress  now  nearly  8-|  years,  he  is  still  the  young¬ 
est  man  in  the  Ohio  delegation.  (Editor's  Note:  Mr.  Jones  is  40 
years  old).  I  am  sure  the  Ohio  delegation,  both  Republicans  and 
Democrats,  wish  him  well  in  his  new  position.  While  his  leaving 
will  be  a  loss  to  the  district  which  he  has  so  ably  represented  and 
to  the  State  of  Ohio,  it  will  be  a  much  greater  loss  to  the  Nation. 
His  outstanding  work  as  a  member  of  the  Committee  on  Appropriations 
was  distinctively  Nation-wide  in  its  scope.  Anyone  who  saw  him  per¬ 
form  in  his  handling  of  the  Interior  Department  Appropriation  bill 
on  this  floor  some  few  weeks  ago  surely  realized  that  his  work  was 
distinctively  Nation-wide.  I  have  heard  many  Members  say  that  by 
his  masterful  handling  of  that  bill  he  proved  that  he  is  a  master 
parliamentarian.  His  work  on  the  Committee  of  Appropriations  for  the 
last  few  years  has  made  him  a  national  figure.  And  it  has  won  for 
him  the  admiration  of  all  the  members  of  this  great  committee, 
whether  Republicans  or  Democrats.  *  *  *  * 

“Here  he  is  today  with  nearly  9  years  of  service  in  the 
greatest  legislative  tody  in  the  world  behind  him,  yet  he  has  before 
him  the  best  years  of  his  life.  I  predict  for  him  great  success  in 
the  position  to  which  the  President  of  the  United  States  has  appoint¬ 
ed  him.  He  was  appointed  because  he  had  a  good  record  which  could 
not  be  successfully  assailed.  n 

Former  Democratic  Speaker  Sam  Rayburn,  of  Texas,  broke  in: 

"I  do  not  want  to  let  this  opportunity  pa6s  without  saying 
a  word  about  the  service  of  Bob  Jones  and  the  type  and  character  of 
man  I  think  he  is. 

"I  do  not  think  there  have  been  better  men  to  serve  in  the 
House  of  Representatives  than  BobJones.  I  shall  miss  him  very  much 
personally,  and  I  know  that  the  House  will  miss  his  splendid  ability 
and  his  great  efficiency.  He  is  going  to  a  place  where  he  can,  and 

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I  think  will,  be  of  great  service.  He  is  going  to  a  Commission  which 
I  think  will  not  be  hurt  by  the  infusion  of  some  Bob  Jones  blood.  ” 

Republican  Floor  Leader  Charles  A.  Halleck,  of  Indiana, 

said: 


ttI  consider  him  one  of  our  outstanding  Members  -  a  man  of 
unquestioned  integrity  and  honesty.  He  has  shown  but  one  purpose, 
and  that  is  to  do  the  right  as  he  sees  the  right  in  the  interest  of 
all  the  people  of  this  great  country. 

,fAs  Chairman  of  the  Interior  Department  Subcommittee  of 
the  Committee  on  Appropriations,  he  had  a  most  difficult  assignment. 
In  his  handling  of  that  bill  he  showed  a  detailed  knowledge  of  every 
single  item  in  it.  He  always  supported  his  arguments  with  facts. n 

Representative  Taber  (r),  of  New  York,  Appropriations  Com¬ 
mittee  Chairman,  declared: 

•'Bob  Jones  came  here  as  an  able  young  lawyer.  As  a  result 
of  the  most  diligent  effort  in  committee  and  on  the  floor,  and  trem¬ 
endous  study,  day  and  night,  he  became  one  of  the  ablest  parliament¬ 
arians  we  had  on  the  floor,  and  one  of  the  most  effective  committee 
members  and  one  of  those  who  was  best  able  to  handle  a  bill  and  put 
it  across  on  the  floor. 

”1  am  sure  that  in  the  work  he  is  tackling  in  the  Federal 
Communications  Commission,  he  will  make  a  record  which  will  stand 
out  just  as  his  record  has  stood  out  here. B 

One  Representative  after  another  arose  to  pay  his  tribute 
to  Mr.  Jones,  namely  Representatives  Cliff  Clevenger  (R),  of  Ohio; 

W.  F.  Norrell  (D),  of  Arkansas;  Robert  Sikes  (D),  of  Florida;  Robert 
F.  Rich  (R),  of  Pennsylvania;  Walter  E.  Brehm  (r),  of  Ohio;  John  M. 
Vorys  (R),  of  Ohio;  George  H.  Mahon  (D),  of  Texas;  Carl  T.  Curtis ( r) 
of  Nebraska;  Karl  Stefan  (R),  of  Nebraska;  Robert  A.  Grant  (R),  of 
Indiana;  J.  Percy  Priest  (D),  of  Tennessee;  J.  Harry  McGregor  (R), 
of  Ohio;  Karl  M,  LeCompte  (R),  of  Iowa;  Sam  Hobbs  ( D) ,  of  Alabama; 

L.  Mendel  Rivers  ( D) ,  of  South  Carolina;  Homer  A.  Ramey  (r),  of  Ohio; 
John  Kunkel  (R),  of  Ohio;  Ivor  D.  Fenton  ( R) ,  of  Maine;  Estes  Kefauv- 
er  (D),  of  Tennessee;  H.  Carl  Anderson  (R),  of  Minnesota,  and  Emanuel 
Oeller  (D)  of  New  York, 

Finally,  Representative  Jone6  responded,  in  part: 

"Of  course  I  am  very  grateful  for  the  kind  words  that  have 
been  said  about  me  here  this  afternoon.  I  choose,  however,  to  con¬ 
sider  them  as  impersonal  and  that  they  represent  an  ideal  to  which 
you  Members  of  the  House,  with  whom  I  have  served,  would  like  to  see 
a  colleague  of  yours  adhere.  *  *  * 

WI  go  to  the  position  to  which  I  have  been  appointed  by 
the  President  of  the  United  States  with  a  background  of  the  tradi¬ 
tions  of  this  House  of  Representatives.  I  go  as  a  recent  Member  of 
a  great  legislative  body,  close  to  the  people;  a  legislative  body 

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that  cherishes  and  defends  freedom.  We  may  differ  at  times  over 
the  way  we  arrive  at  the  solution  of  our  problem,  but  we  discuss 
them,  we  debate,  decide  and  when  the  majority  speaks,  we  all  abide 
by  that  decision.  *  *  *  * 

"The  nearly  10  years  I  have  spent  here  I  know  will  assist 

me  greatly  in  the  duties  I  shall  take  up  on  September  3.  To  have  the 

point  of  view  of  men  and  women  who  are  trying  to  preserve  liberty 
and  freedom  is  a  distinguished  background  and  will  be  of  great  assist¬ 
ance  in  serving  on  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  which  has 
so  much  to  do  with  freedom  of  speech  and  freedom  of  communications 
throughout  the  United  States,  in  fact  throughout  the  world,*  *  * 

"I  shall  miss  you  all,  of  course.  Our  relationship  may 

never  be  the  same  again  because,  after  all,  I  am  leaving  the  House 

of  Representatives  to  become  a  bureaucrat* ,  I  do  not  expect  any 
quarter  from  any  one  in  this  House  in  that  capacity,  because  I  gave 
no  quarter  as  a  member  of  the  Appropriations  Committee  to  any  of  the 
bureaucrats,  I  hope  sincerely,  though,  that  when  I  do  come  back  you 
csn  give  to  me  the  same  clean  bill  of  health  you  have  given  me  as  I 
leave  you  today. " 

The  tributes  to  the  new  Federal  Communications  Commissioner 
cover  three  and  a  half  pages  (beginning  with  No.  10311)  in  the 
Congressional  Record  of  July  25  in  addition  to  several  members  hav¬ 
ing  been  granted  permission  to  e  xtend  their  remarks  in  later  issues. 

XXXXXXXXXXXX 

FCC  INVESTIGATING  LOCAL  POWER  LINES  "WIRED-WIRELESS" 

The  Federal  Communications  Commission  is  investigating 
reports  that  some  individuals  and  groups  have  gegun,  or  plan,  "wired- 
wireless"  broadcast  service  over  local  power  lines. 

"Indications  are  that  the  necessary  equipment  is  being 
supplied  by  firme  or  agents  with  the  mistaken  assurance  that  this 
type  of  operation  does  not  come  under  Commission  jurisdiction",  says 
the  FCC.  "There  is  further  indication  that  the  operators,  also,  are 
not  familiar  with  Commission  requirements. 

"This  use  is  not  covered  specifically  by  the  Communica¬ 
tions  Act  or  the  Commission1  s  rules  and  regulations.  However,  it  is 
subject  to  regulations  which  govern  the  operation  of  low-power  radio 
frequency  devices  intended  for  control  rather  than  for  broadcast 
purposes.  These  sections  specify  maximum  power  and  range  for  such 
devices  if  they  are  to  be  excepted  from  the  licensing  procedure. 

"There  is  no  provision  under  the  low-power  rules  which 
countenance  the  establishment  of  a  station  comparable  to  presently 
authorized  broadcast  stations.  By  no  stretch  of  the  imagination 
can  it  be  interpreted  that  the  Commission  intended  low-power  devices 
to  be  converted  into  stations  for  communicating  through  space  by 
radio,  employing  call  letters  selected  at  random,  operating  on 


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7/30/47 


frequencies  assigned  to  the  standard  broadcast  bend,  and  broadcast¬ 
ing  commercial  announcements. 

‘•instances  where  the  potential  purchaser  has  been  assured 
by  the  distributor  or  manufacturer  that  a  certain  low-power  device 
conforms  with  the  established  rules  have  been  brought  to  the  atten¬ 
tion  of  the  Commission.  While  this  unconventional  practice  may  ex¬ 
ist,  it  does  not  relieve  the  owner  or  operator  of  the  responsibility 
for  determining  that  the  Commission's  requirements  are  fulfilled. 

"Unlicensed  radio  operation,  which  normally  results  when 
low-power  devices  exceed  the  limitations  provided,  creates  a  defin¬ 
ite  menace  to  important  communications  and  may  subject  the  operator 
to  serious  penalties  provided  for  in  the  Communications  Act,  includ¬ 
ing  a  maximum  fine  of  CIO, 000  or  two  years'  imprisonment,  or  both.*** 

"As  originally  conceived,  the  rules  provided  for  the  use 
of  low^-power  radio  frequency  devices  for  control  purposes.  The  con¬ 
trol  device  employs  a  conventional  house  lighting  circuit  to  provide 
a  link  between  the  transmitter  device  and  the  unit  to  be  controlled. 
The  apparatus  generating  the  electro  magnetic  field  must  always  be 
operated  at  a  distance  less  than  157,000  feet  divided  by  the  fre¬ 
quency  of  operation  in  kilocycles  from  the  unit  to  be  controlled. 

For  example;  At  1000  kilocycles,  in  the  middle  of  the  standard 
broadcast  band,  the  maximum  distance  of  operation  should  not  be 
greater  than  157  feet.  When  the  radiation  from  low  oower  radio 
frequency  devices  exceeds  the  calculated  maximum  distance  permissible, 
the  equipment  assumes  the  status  of  an  unlicensed  transmitter  and 
the  owner  and  operator  are  subject  to  the  penalties  provided  in  the 
Communications  Act.  *  *  * 

"While  the  so-called  'campus  radio'  of  the  Intercollegiate 
Broadcasting  System,  which  is  confined  to  the  individual  wired  pre¬ 
cincts  of  more  than  50  schools  and  colleges,  is  not  licensed,  its 
operators  see  that  it  conforms  to  FCC  low-power  rules. 

"Even  though  low  power  is  employed,  equipment  of  this  type 
may  be  accidentally  or  intentionally  coupled  to  radiating  antennas 
or  power  supply  lines  so  as  to  interfere  with  radio  reception.  In 
this  respect  the  interference  may  well  be  caused  by  harmonics  rather 
than  on  the  fundamental  frequency. 

"Of  course,  if  a  control  device  is  to  be  operated  over 
distance  or  with  greater  power  than  those  specified,  it  is  necessary 
to  first  obtain  a  license  from  the  Commission.  Licenses  are  issued 
without  cost,  and  application  forms  may  be  obtained  from  any  Commis¬ 
sion  field  office,  or  by  writing  to  the  'Secretary,  Federal  Communi¬ 
cations  Commission,  Washington  25,  D.  C. "  Likewise,  the  Commission 
and  its  field  offices  will  be  glad  to  answer  any  inquiries  concern¬ 
ing  use  of  low-power  devices. 

"Licenses  may  be  granted  to  operate  radio  control  devices 
on  certain  frequencies  within  the  band  27.430  to  27.480  megacycles 
shared  with  the  Industrial,  Scientific  and  Medical  Service;  and  also 
within  the  Citizens  Radio  Service  band  460-470  megacycles.  At  this 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


7/30/47 


time,  operation  of  these  devices  would  be  under  the  terms  of  experi¬ 
mental  licenses. 

".Amateur  radio  stations  may  also  be  used  for  transmitting 
signals  to  receiving  apparatus  in  connection  with  the  control  of 
remote  objects  such  as  model  aircraft.  This  is  provided  in  Section 
12.101  of  the  rules  governing  amateur  operation.  However,  an 
amateur  station  used  for  this  purpose  must  be  operated  by  a  licensed 
amateur  radio  operator  on  frequencies  assigned  for  the  use  of  amateur 
stations.  " 


(Editor’s  Note:  It  was  said  at  the  FCC  that  the  Commis¬ 
sion  investigating  reports  of  ’’wired  wireless"  broadcast  service 
over  local  power  lines  were  not  inspired  by  Zenith’s  phone  vision 
plans.  See  "power  Lines  people  Also  Inquire  About  ’Pay  As  You  See 
TV' " immediately  following.) 

XXXXXXXXXX 

POWER  LINES  PEOPLE  ALSO  INQUIRE  ABOUT  "PAY  AS  YOU  SEE"  TV 

Commander  E.  F.  McDonald,  Jr. ,  president  of  the  Zenith 
Radio  Corporation,  at  the  annual  stockholders  meeting  in  Chicago 
last  week,  revealed  further  details  of  the  company’s  plans  for 
"phone  vision",  Zenith's  new  method  of  providing  "pay-as-you-see " 
home  television  programs  of  current  movies  and  other  entertainment 
features. 


Commander  McDonald  told  stockholders  that  Zenith  had  been 
working  since  1931  on  a  method  of  using  telephone  wires  for  televi¬ 
sion,  but  that  it  was  only  three  months  ago  that  he  received  permis¬ 
sion  from  his  patent  attorneys  to  reveal  development  of  phone  vision. 

He  sai  d  that  three  months  ago  he  had  talked  to  two  vice 
presidents  of  the  American  Telephone  and  Telegraph  Co.,  who  were 
and  are  interested  in  phone  vision.  He  also  said  that  since  announce¬ 
ment  of  phone  vision  earlier  this  month,  Zenith  had  been  approached 
by  three  electric  utility  companies  who  were  anxious  to  have  power 
lines  instead  of  telephone  wires  used  with  the  system. 

Mr.  McDonald  also  described  a  conversation  with  the  head 
of  one  of  the  largest  motion  picture  companies,  which  also  operates 
a  chain  of  theaters  in  large  cities.  He  declined  to  reveal  the  name 
of  the  film  executive,  but  quoted  him  as  saying,  "phone  vision  will 
give  us  twenty  million  new  outlets,  and  we  are  looking  for  distribu¬ 
tion.  " 

Commander  McDonald  also  said  that  the  telephone  company 
had  been  approached  earlier  by  three  different  movie  producers  who 
wondered  if  there  might  not  be  some  method  of  using  telephone  wires 
to  create  a  box  office  for  movies,  but  that  phone  vision  was  the 
first  solution  offered  to  the  problem. 

Mr.  McDonald  touched  on  the  economics  of  phone  vision  by 
pointing  out  that  although  average  cost  of  producing  features  is 
more  than  $650, 000,  with  many  running  into  several  millions,  film 
producers  receive  an  average  of  only  about  4|  cents  from  each 


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He lnl  Radio  News  Se rvice 


7/30/47 


theater  viewer.  Then,  emphasizing  that  this  was  only  surmising,  he 
said  that  if  the  cost  of  seeing  a  new  feature,  such  as  the  Yearling, 
in  the  home  by  phone  vision  were  $1,  and  it  were  seen  by  a  family 
of  five,  the  producer  would  need  only  25/  to  average  5/  per  viewer. 
This  would  leave,  he  suggested,  75/  to  be  divided  between  the  tele¬ 
phone  or  utility  company  and  the  television  transmitting  station.” 

XXXXXXXXXX 

WDAY  FREE  NON-PARTISAN  SERVICE  TO  CONGRESSMEN  MAKES  HIT 

Qpite  a  bouquet  was  tossed  at  Station  WDAY,  National 
Broadcasting  Company  outlet,  in  Fargo,  N.  D. ,  by  Senator  Milton  R. 
Young,  of  North  Dakota,  for  free  facilities  it  afforded  Senators 
and  Representatives  of  that  part  of  the  country. 

”A11  during  this  session  radio  station  WDAY,  one  of  North 
Dakota* s  outstanding  broadcasting  stations,  has  conducted  a  most 
commendable  program  which  has  permitted  the  Members  of  Congress  from 
its  coverage  area  to  report,  in  a  non-political  way,  the  progress  of 
legislation,  allowing  them  freely  to  express  themselves”,  Mr.  Young 
reported  in  the  Congressional  Ftecord. 

"The  Members  of  Congress  have  greatly  appreciated  this 
service  and  wish  to  commend  Station  WDAY  for  making  the  service  pos¬ 
sible. 


”1  ask  unanimous  consent  that  a  telegram  I  have  just  re¬ 
ceived  from  Station  WDAY  be  inserted  in  the  Record  as  a  part  of  my 
remarks.  ” 

The  telegram  read: 

”As  the  first  session  of  the  Eightieth  Congress  of  the 
United  States  draws  close  to  its  final  hours,  the  newsroom  of  WDAY 
wishes  to  express  its  thanks  to  the  Senators  and  Representatives 
from  the  Northwest  for  their  cooperation  during  this  session  in  the 
presentation  of  Washington  news.  Through  their  help  we  have  been 
able  to  give  this  area  one  of  the  most  complete  reports  of  daily 
Washington  news  and  of  special  topics  of  particular  interest  to  the 
people  of  this  area.  Their  response  to  queries  for  specific  inform¬ 
ation  has  at  all  times  enabled  us  to  answer  similar  queries  for 
information  from  WDAY*s  listeners.  To  these  Senators  and  Representa¬ 
tives  the  WDAY  newsroom  extends  thanks  on  this  final  broadcast  of 
the  weekly  Washington  report.  " 

XXXXXXXXXX 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


7/30/47 


SYLVANIA  SALES  INCREASE  69  PER  CENT  IN  FIRST  HALF  OF  1947 


Net  sales  of  Sylvania  Electric  Products,  Inc.  for  the  six 
months  ended  June  30,  1947,  were  $47,756,365,  an  increase  of  69  per 
cent  over  sales  of  $28,187,728  in  the  corresponding  period  of  1946. 
Net  sales  for  the  three  months  ended  June  30,  1947,  totaled 
$24,219,586  compared  with  $15,353,597  for  the  second  quarter  of 
1946,  an  increase  of  57.7  per  cent. 

Net  income  for  the  first  half  of  the  year  was  $1,538,977 
equal  to  $1.35  per  share  on  the  1,006,550  shares  of  common  stock 
outstanding  after  deducting  dividends  on  the  $4  cumulative  prefer¬ 
red  stock.  This  compares  with  $558,468  or  36  cents  per  share  on 
1,005,000  shares  of  common  stock  in  the  first  half  of  1946,  For  the 
three  months  ended  June  30,  1947,  net  income  was  $735,635,  equal  to 
63  cents  per  share  on  the  common  stock. 

The  report  added  that  new  and  improved  machinery,  improved 
manufacturing  efficiencies,  higher  sales  prices  on  some  of  the  com¬ 
pany^  products,  and  the  passing  along  of  an  excise  tax  formerly 
absorbed  by  the  company  on  certain  of  its  products,  are  expected  to 
offset  a  large  part  of  the  estimated  increased  labor  costs. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

CBS  CHAIRMAN  MARRIES  FORMER  BARBARA  CUSHING  OF  BOSTON 

The  marriage  of  Mrs.  Barbara  Cushing  Mortimer  and  William 
S.  Paley,  Chairman  of  the  Board  of  the  Columbia  Broadcasting  System, 
took  place  at  Manhassett,  Long  Island,  last  Monday  afternoon  at  the 
home  of  the  bride's  mother,  Mrs,  Harvey  W.  Cushing.  Only  members  of 
the  two  families  were  present  at  the  ceremony,  performed  by  Supreme 
Court  Justice  J.  Edward  Lumbard,  Jr. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Paley  plan  to  sail  on  Friday  on  the  "Queen 
Elizabeth"  for  a  wedding  trip  abroad. 

The  bride  is  a  daughter  also  of  the  late  Dr.  Cushing,  noted 
brain  specialist  of  Boston.  She  is  the  sister  of  Mrs.  Vincent  Astor 
and  Mrs.  John  Hay  Whitney,  and  is  the  former  wife  of  Stanley  G. 
Mortimer,  Jr.,  of  New  York  and  Tuxedo  Park,  N.  Y. 

Mr,  Paley' s  first  wife,  the  former  Miss  Dorothy  Hart, 
was  at  one  time  married  to  John  Randolph  Hearst. 

XXXXXXXX 

United  Air  Lines  announced  in  Chicago  last  Friday  it  had 
purchased  200  radar  altimeters  and  would  begin  installation  of  the 
safety  equipment  on  all  its  air-liners  within  a  few  months.  The 
radar  altimeter  is  an  electronic  device  which  warns  the  pilot  by 
signal  lights  of  the  proximity  of  the  ground  as  well  as  other  ob¬ 
stacles  in  his  path.  It  has  an  effective  range  of  60me  8000  feet 
below  and  ahead  of  the  plane, 

XXXXXXXXXXX 


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7/30/47 


STORER-RYAN  PASS  20TH  MILESTONE;  LOOK  FORWARD  TO  NEXT  20 


Congratulations  are  being  received  by  Commander  George  B. 
Storer  and  J.  Harold  Ryan,  president  and  Vice-President  respectively 
of  the  Fort  Industry  Company  broadcasting  stations  celebrating 
their  twentieth  anniversary.  In  expressing  appreciation  for  their 
success,  Messrs.  Storer  and  Ryan  state: 

"We  look  forward  to  another  20  years  based  upon  our  con¬ 
cept  of  radio  and  television  operation  -  which  is  to  develop  facil¬ 
ities  alio ted  us  by  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  to  the 
utmost  in  the  public  interest.  " 

Their  stations  are  WJBK,  Detroit,  home  of  Commander 
Storer:  WSPD,  Toledo,  home  of  Mr.  Ryan  (Storer  and  Ryan  are  brothers- 
in  law);  WLOK,  Lima,  Ohio;  WWVA,  Wheeling,  W.  Va. ;  WMMN,  Fairmont, 

W.  Va. ;  WAGA,  Atlanta,  and  WG3S  (whose  call  letters  are  the  initials 
of  Mr.  Storer  an  d  a  famous  Britisher  who  is  also  celebrating  a 
birthday) . 


A  new  sales  record  was  set  when  Fort  Industry  paid  $700,000 
for  WJBK,  250  watt  station  on  1490  kc  in  Detroit.  Also  a  television 
license  has  been  granted  Fort  Industry  in  Detroit,  which  is  to  have 
a  500  foot  antenna  tower,  which  is  only  50  feet  short  of  the  height 
of  the  Washington  Monument. 

Messrs.  Storer  and  Ryan  are  two  of  the  most  popular  fig¬ 
ures  in  radio.  Commander  Storer  has  been  identified  over  the  years 
with  Detroit  radio  ownership,  including  WGHP  (now  WXYZ),  which  he 
sold  to  King-Trendle;  CKOK  (which  became  CKLW)  and  an  interest  in 
WJBK.  In  W  orld  War  II,  Commander  Storer  left  active  direction  of 
The  Fort  Industry  to  accept  a  Naval  commission  and  was  assigned  as 
Inspection  Director  of  the  Chicago  Naval  District.  Later  he  was 
transferred  to  Navy  Department  headquarters  in  the  Office  of  Procure¬ 
ment  and  Materiel. 

Mr.  Ryan  in  World  War  II  served  as  radio  censor  for  the 
United  States.  He  was  second  in  command  to  Byron  Price,  who  also 
had  under  him  the  press.  Mr.  Ryan  was  so  successful  in  what  was  per¬ 
haps  one  of  the  toughest  war  jobs  that  so  far  as  known  not  a  major 
complaint  was  received  from  the  broadcasters.  Following  the  war, 

Mr.  Ryan  was  drafted  as  President  of  the  National  Association  of 
Broadcasters, 

Messrs.  Storer  and  Ryan  first  became  associated  when  they 
went  into  the  gasoline  business  in  1928.  In  1927  the  Fort  Industry 
Oil  Company  was  formed  in  Cleveland  and  Toledo  and  to  promote  it, 
radio  was  used.  Arrangements  were  made  with  the  then  local  station 
WTAL  in  Toledo  and  the  Storer- Rym  partnership  soon  owned  the  sta¬ 
tion  and  changed  the  call  letters  to  WSPD.  In  1931  the  gasoline 
business  was  sold  and  the  firm  went  into  radio  as  its  main  activity. 

In  connection  with  its  seven  stations,  The  Fort  Industry 
maintains  a  Washington  office  in  charge  of  Commander  John  Koepf,  who 
before  entering  the  Navy  was  associated  with  proctor  &  Gamble  aid 
Station  WLW  in  Cincinnati. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


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He lnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/30/47 


STRONGER  ANTI-LIQUOR  ADVERTISING  BILL  CONSIDERED  BY  SENATE 


Senators  Clyde  M.  Reed  (R),  of  Kansas),  and  Edwin  C. 

Johnson  (D),  of  Colorado,  a  two  man  Senate  Interstate  Commerce  sub¬ 
committee,  are  studying  a  bill  introduced  by  Senator  Arthur  Capper 
( R) ,  of  Kansas,  under  which  all  liquor  advertising  would  be  banned. 
They  agreed  at  a  meeting  Tuesday  that  Capper's  sweeping  bill  would 
not  be  "practical  "  in  its  present  form  and  offered  their  own  substi¬ 
tute. 

It  would  forbid  the  publication  or  broadcast  of  advertise¬ 
ments  which  "by  word,  device  or  sound,  imply  that  the  use  of  liquor 
is  beneficial  to  health,  will  increase  social  or  business  prestige, 
or  is  traditional  in  American  family  life.  "  Ads  which  contained 
such  "implications *  would  be  classed  as  "misleading  under  the 
Federal  Trade  Commission  Act". 

The  new  version  was  drafted  by  Reed.  Johnson  endorsed 
it  but  said  that  it  does  not  go  quite  far  enough.  He  suggested  an 
added  clause  to  make  it  illegal  for  any  liquor,  wine  or  beer 
advertisement  to  include  a  picture  of  a  woman,  child  or  family  scene. 

The  Reed  bill  and  Johnson's  added  proposal  will  be  sub¬ 
mitted  to  the  full  Senate  Commerce  Committee  next  January.  Reed 
"assumed"  that  public  hearings  would  be  held. 

XXXXXXXXX 

VIGILANT  PRESS  PRAISED  BY  JESS  WILLARD,  NAB  V-P 

Commemorating  "Freedom  of  Speech  Night",  and  preceding 
the  performance  of  "The  Common  Glory",  at  Williamsburg,  Va. , 

A.  D.  Willard,  Jr.,  Executive  Vice  President  of  the  National  Associ¬ 
ation  of  Broadcasters,  addressing  the  audience  last  night  (Tuesday) 
cited  government- imposed  limitations  as  "the  greatest  danger  to 
individual  freedom".  He  stated,  however,  that  "because  we  have  a 
free  press"  and  a  "vigilant  press,  which  has  kept  the  people  in 
day-to-day  communion  with  the  activities  of  their  elected  leaders", 
we  have  escaped  such  restrictions, 

Mr.  Willard,  continuing,  warned  "that  without  a  free 
radio,  we  will  not  have  for  long  a  free  press.  " 

Tuesday  night's  performance  is  the  first  of  a  series 
dedicated  to  "Four  Freedoms"  -  freedom  of  speech,  freedom  of  assembly, 
freedom  of  religion  and  freedom  of  the  press, 

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7/30/47 


MORE  "VOICE  OF  AMERICA"  PROGRAMS  TO  RUSSIA;  FEWER  ELSEWHERE 


The  State  Department  has  expanded  Its  Voice  of  America 
broadcasting  to  Russia  while  curtailing  other  programs  because  of 
reduced  appropriations  allocated  by  Congress. 

Officials  sai  d  a  new  one-half  hour  program,  including  15 
minutes  of  news  in  the  Russian  language  and  15  minutes  of  recorded 
music,  would  be  beamed  to  Moscow  at  midnight,  Russian  time,  start¬ 
ing  tonight.  This  is  in  addition  to  a  one-hour  nighSLy  broadcast  of 
news,  scientific  and  cultural  features  and  music  which  is  beamed  to 
Russia  from  9  to  10  P.M. ,  Russian  time.  The  9  P.M.  program  was 
started  several  months  ago. 

Officials  said  the  additional  half-hour  broadcast  later  in 
the  evening  would  not  involve  any  additional  cost,  since  it  will  be 
prepared  by  the  same  staff. 

Assistant  Secretary  of  State  Benton  announced  the  Voice  of 
America  programs  are  being  reduced  as  a  whole  by  40  per  cent. 

The  progran  reduction,  Mr.  Benton  said,  is  one  of  a  series 
of  major  steps  planned  to  bring  the  department’s  international  infor¬ 
mation  and  cultural  affairs  activities  within  the  limits  of  the 
$12,400,000  appropriation  voted  by  Congress.  More  than  $30,000,000 
had  been  asked. 

The  new  budget  includes  $6,900,000  for  the  Voice  of  America 
during  the  current  fiscal  year,  as  compared  to  $8,400,000  available 
for  the  12  months  ended  last  June.  The  present  staff  of  500  persons 
working  on  overseas  broadcasts  will  be  reduced  to  about  225. 

XXXXXXXX 

SURVEY  SHOWS  RADIO  SETS  CHEAPER  THAN  10  YEARS  AGO 

Frank  W.  Mansfield,  Director  of  Sales  Research  for  Sylvania 
has  come  to  the  conclusion  that,  in  spite  of  the  present  day  trend 
toward  higher  prices,  people  paid  less  for  a  radio  in  1946  than  they 
did  ten  years  ago* 

Looking  at  the  matter  from  one  viewpoint,  in  1936  it  was 
necessary  to  work  2.56  weeks  in  order  to  have  enough  money  to  buy 
the  average  priced  radio,  that  is,  provided  you  saved  all  your  pay 
for  that  purpose.  Last  year,  the  average  worker  could  get  a  new 
radio  after  working  only  1.  25  weeks. 

The  average  retail  price  of  a  radio  in  1936  was  $55.70. 

Mr.  Average  Workingman  was  getting  $21.78  per  week  then.  Last  year, 
Mr.  A.  Workingman’s  earnings  increased  to  $43.71  while  the  average 
radio  price  declined  to  $54.52.  Mr.  A.  W.  had  to  work  less  than  half 
the  time  to  get  the  equivalent  radio  of  ten  years  ago,  pricewise 
speaking. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

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7/30/47 


ETHRIDGE  ENDS  UN  CHORE;  RETURNS  TO  RADIO,  NEWSPAPER  DUTIES 


After  five  and  a  half  months*  service  as  United  States 
representative  on  the  United  Nations  Balkan  Investigation  Commission, 
Mark  F.  Ethridge,  former  President  of  the  National  Association  of 
Broadcasters,  has  resumed  his  duties  as  publisher  of  The  Louisville 
Courier  Journal  m  d  President  of  WHAS,  Louisville,  Ky. 

Mr.  Ethridge  said  he  regretted  that  he  was  not  able  to 
remain  for  the  final  decision  of  the  Security  Council  on  the  Commis¬ 
sion’s  report,  but  that  he  felt  that  he  must  resume  his  duties  in 
Louisville. 

XXXXXXXXX 

AMERICAN  FORUM  OF  THE  AIR  PRAISED  IN  CONGRESS 

Four  pages  of  the  Congressional  Record  (July  7)  were  devot¬ 
ed  to  Theodore  Gran lk  and  the  American  Forum  of  the  Air.  Said 
Representative  Emanuel  Celler  (D),  of  New  York: 

"This  weekly  radio  discussion  program  is  a  unique  institu¬ 
tion  in  our  Nation’s  Capital,  The  proceedings  of  the  American  Forum 
of  the  Air  as  they  are  broadcast  every  Tuesday  night  through  the 
facilities  of  the  Mutual  Broadcasting  System  to  every  corner  of  our 
land  stimulate  our  people  to  think  clearly  on  the  vital  problems  of 
the  day. 

"We  Members  of  Congress  who  are  forced  by  the  press  of 
our  duties  in  Washington  to  remain  away  from  our  home  districts  for 
various  periods  of  time  realize  only  too  well  the  value  of  informing 
the  people  back  home  about  our  work.  *  *  * 

"This  radio  program,  which  is  the  oldest  pubL  ic  service 
discussion  program,  recently  celebrated  its  nineteenth  anniversary. 
For  19  years  it  has  presented  discussions  of  vital  issues  with  out¬ 
standing  authorities.  The  name  American  Forum  of  the  Air  has  been 
established  in  the  minds  of  America’s  radio  listeners  as  the  program 
from  which  they  can  get  both  sides  of  an  issue.'*'  *  *  * 

"The  early  program  was  called  law  for  laymen  snd  was  broad¬ 
cast  over  the  facilities  of  radio  station  WOR  in  the  city  of  New 
York.  When  Theodore  Granik  cane  to  Washington  as  counsel  for  the 
United  States  Housing  Authority,  he  brought  his  radio  program  with 
him  which  was  broadcast  through  the  facilities  of  WCL  here  in 
Washington  as  well  as  WOR,  New  York.  The  program  grew  and  developed 
with  the  Mutual  Eroadcasting  System  into  the  present  American  Forum 
of  the  Air.  " 


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7/30/47 


FBI  OBJECTS  TO  TITLE  FOR  NEW  WOR  SERIES 


The  Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation  in  Washington  made 
known  Monday  that  it  objected  strongly  to  use  of  the  title  "Top 
Secrets  of  the  FBI ",  for  a  proposed  new  program  series  on  WOR.  An 
official  spokesman  for  the  Bureau  emphasized  the  agency  was  not  re¬ 
vealing  its  "top  secrets",  and  that,  contrary  to  the  station* s 
announcement  over  the  week-end,  it  had  not  lent  official  sanction 
or  approval  to  the  series. 

The  FBI  spokesman,  who  was  reached  by  Jack  Gould  of  the 
New  York  Times  by  telephone  in  Washington,  said  that  the  bureau 
recognized  that  its  activities  were  a  matter  of  legitimate  public 
interest,  but  that  it  could  not  approve  of  a  venture  which  it  believ¬ 
ed  might  impair  the  agency* s  reputation  or  dignity. 

The  only  radio  program  carrying  the  FBI’s  formal  endorse¬ 
ment,  the  spokesman  ssi  d,  is  "This  Is  Your  FBI,  produced  by  Jerry 
Devine  and  carried  on  the  American  network.  For  this  program,  the 
spokesman  said,  FBI  officials  on  their  own  time  check  the  scripts 
for  accuracy  and  for  educational  values  in  explaining  the  problems 
of  law  enforcement. 


xxxxxxxx 

U.S.  TELEVISION  PASSES  1000TH  BIG-SCREEN  TELE  PROJECTION  SET 

Having  passed  the  one-thousand  mark  in  big-screen  projec¬ 
tion  television  sets  produced,  the  United  States  Television  Mfg.  Corp. 
is  now  steadily  increasing  its  production  of  projection  models, 
according  to  Hamilton  Hoge,  President  of  UST.  Not  counting  all  other 
television  receivers  made,  United  States  Television  made  its  1000th 
projection  set  on  July  24, 

The  count  was  kept  on  the  projection  receiver  with  the  475 
square  inch  screen,  which  UST  says  is  the  largest  on  any  television 
set  being  mass  produced  today.  Because  it  is  a  great  crowd-pleaser , 
this  set  has  become  the  favorite  with  owners  of  taverns,  hotels, 
and  restaurants.  United  States  Television  also  makes  console  tele¬ 
vision  receivers  for  the  home  which  were  not  included  in  the  produc¬ 
tion  total. 


Production  is  being  stepped  up  on  the  big-screen  projection 
television  receivers  because  of  the  demand  for  these  public  place 
sets  throughout  the  country,  Mr.  Hoge  reported.  The  demand  has 
increased  heavily  in  areas  outside  of  New  York  City  and  routine  ship¬ 
ments  are  now  being  made  to  all  cities  with  television  programs. 

Das  tribution  is  now  made  in  thirteen  states  and  Washington,  D.  C# 

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He  ini  r&dio  News  Service 


7/30/47 


: : :  SCISSORS  AND  PASTE 

#  •  • 

t  t  «  _ _________________ _ , _ _ 


Would  Allow  FCC  More  Flexibility  Than  In  New  Radio  Bill 

(^WaSKington  Post11] 

Senator  Wallace  White1 8  bill  contains  extensive  amendments 
to  the  existing  Communications  Act  designed  to  assure  fairness  on 
the  part  of  broadcasters  in  the  allotment  of  time  on  their  radio 
stations  for  the  discussion  of  controversial  issues  and  political 
campaigns.  The  existing  law  stipulates  merely  that  broadcasters 
should  "afford  equal  opportunities’1  to  all  political  candidates, 
leaving  to  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  the  task  of  maJking 
rules  and  regulations  to  carry  this  stipulation  into  effect.  It 
seems  to  us  that  this  vesting  of  discretion  in  the  regulatory  agency 
is  a  good  deal  more  prudent  than  Senator  White* s  attempt  to  write 
the  regulations  into  the  statute. 

Under  Senator  White's  bill,  a  station  licensee  would  be 
forbidden  during  a  political  campaign  to  permit  the  use  of  his  star 
tion  for  or  against  any  candidate  for  public  office  excepting  the 
candidate  himself,  his  qualified  opponents,  persons  authorized  by 
them  or  authorized  representatives  of  recognized  political  parties 
whose  candidates'  names  appear  on  the  ballot.  As  FCC  Chairman  Denny 
has  pointed  out,  this  would  deny  use  of  the  radio  to  minority  groups 
or  parties  seeking  a  chance  to  get  on  the  ballot.  It  would  also 
rule  off  the  air  during  political  campaigns  nonpolitical  organiza¬ 
tions  such  as  labor  unions,  bar  associations  or  the  League  of  Women 
Voters  and  would  even  seriously  restrict  regular  news  commentators 
in  discussing  campaign  issues.  We  agree  with  Mr,  Denny  also  that 
no  useful  purpose  would  be  served  by  Senator  White's  proposal  to 
close  political  debate  24  hours  prior  to  an  election.*  *  *  * 

Senator  White  would  require  broadcasters  to  identify  all 
news  items  as  to  source  and  all  editorial  or  interpretative  comment 
as  to  source  and  responsibility,  announcing  to  the  audience  the  ori¬ 
gin  of  each  at  the  beginning  and  end  of  every  broadcast.  The  aim 
is  la.udable;  but  the  execution,  we  fear,  is  impossible.  Mr.  Denny 
was  quite  right  in  pointing  out  that  "it  will  be  a  matter  of  opinion 
whether  any  particular  report  represents  an  objective  reproduction 
of  the  event  described  or  also  includes  subjective  coloring  reflect¬ 
ing  the  writer's  own  viewpoint”.  We  believe,  of  course,  that  differ¬ 
entiation  between  news  and  interpretation  is  desirable  and  should  be 
zealously  sought  by  broadcasters,  but  we  doubt  the  wisdom  of  setting 
an  unattainable  standard  in  substantive  law. 

Broadcasters  as  well  as  the  public  will  fare  best,  in  our 
estimation,  if  the  FCC  is  granted  a  good  deal  of  flexiU  lity  in  fix¬ 
ing  standards  to  assure  the  equality  of  opportunity  that  radio 
Ideally  ought  to  provide.  A  too  rigid  insistence  on  equality  in  the 
airing  of  controversial  views,  for  instance,  might  result  in  the 
shunning  by  broadcasters  of  all  controversy  -  a  development  that  would 
gravely  impair  radio's  usefulness  as  an  instrument  of  the  democratic 
process. 


-  13 


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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/30/47 


Radio  Versus  Newspapers  In  Dealing,  With  Crime 

(Robert  U.  Brown  in  "Editor  &  Publisher") 

This  isn’t  aradio-versus-newspap er  column.  But  one  thing 
usually  leads  to  another,  and  we  got  to  thinking  about  newspaper 
crime  stories  the  other  night  after  listening  to  several  radio 
detective  aid  psychological  dramas.  In  four  half-hour  programs,  we 
heard  11  people  get  "knocked  off"  by  various  methods  ranging  from 
poisoning  to  shooting  to  "nail  file  in  neck"  technique.  The  killer 
was  rarely  brought  to  justice,  but  eventually  came  to  a  bad  end  him¬ 
self.  Maybe  that’s  radio’s  way  of  portraying  "crme  don’t  pay".  3ut 
it  didn’t  seem  like  very  healthy  entertainment. 

Any way,  it  set  us  to  thinking.  There  has  been  an  unusually 
heavy  budget  of  crime  stories  in  the  newspapers  these  last  few 
weeks.  *  *  *  But  if  the  newspaper  news  budget  had  been  as  top  heavy 
with  crime  stories  as  were  the  air  waves  the  other  night,  there  would 
be  a  howl  from  the  critics  that  could  be  heard  from  be  re  to  there. 


Believes  As  Yet  Televising  Of  Art  Falls  Short 

(Jane  Watson  Crane  in  Washington  Post) 

National 

The  Raphael  painting  singled  out  for  the/gallery’s  first 
television  venture  by  NBC  is  very  small,  which  made  it  possible  to 
reproduce  in  full  in  the  scale  required.  A  beautifully  integrated 
work,  it  has  firm  outlines,  but  also  considerable  detail.  Unfortun¬ 
ately,  it  did  not  reproduce  well  in  television,  nor  did  the  inci¬ 
dental  works  -  a  portrait  of  Catiglione,  the  Houdon  bust  of  Voltaire, 
and  the  Holbein  Edward  VI.  The  details  scarcely  came  through  at  all, 
and  the  forms  lost  a  great  deal  in  transmission.  It  is  interesting 
that  a  small  detail  of  the  Raphael,  a  closeup  to  show  the  signature, 
which  was  t^cen  from  an  enlarged  photograph,  came  out  much  better 
than  the  painting  taken  directly  with  the  television  camera.  Color 
television,  of  course,  is  out  for  the  present,  although  studios 
officials  say  that  that  angle  is  being  worked  on.  *  *  *  *  * 

The  big  advantage  of  television,  so  far  at  least,  would 
seem  to  b e  its  immediacy.  If  the  openings  of  art  exhibitions,  for 
example,  were  televised,  it  would  have  great  publicity  value  to  the 
artists. 

As  an  experiment,  the  National  Gallery’s  venture  was 
fascinating,  but  the  results  did  not  prove  that  the  medium  was  up 
to  it,  A  motion  picture  presentation  would  be  more  satisfactory t 
and  have  the  added  advantage  that  it  could  be  preserved.  When  the 
half-hour  telecast  was  over  Saturday  night,  it  had  vanished  for  all 
time. 


xxxxxxxxxx 

Contents  of  the  International  Review  of  the  International 
Telephone  and  Telegraph  Corp,  for  July  includes  "Norway  -  Giants 
Land";  "All-Weather  Landings  with  Radio  Aids",  and  "Story  of  Stm  d- 
ard  Telephone  and  Radio  System  of  Zurich. ” 

XXXXXXXX 


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He ini  Radio  News  Service 


7/30/47 


•  l  * 

•  •  • 

TRADE  NOTES  :  i: 

•  •  • 

_ _  •  •  • 


Test  bench  power  for  all  types  of  auto  radio  sets  has  be¬ 
come  available  to  radio  servicemen  through  the  introduction  by 
Federal  Telephone  and  Radio  Corporation,  Clifton,  N.  J. ,  of  a  heavy 
duty  selenium  rectifier  power  supply  designed  especially  for  work 
of  this  type. 


For  the  accommodation  of  personnel  of  the  National  Broad¬ 
casting  Company  and  affiliated  stations  planning  to  attend  their 
convention  to  be  held  at  Atlantic  City  on  Friday  and  Saturday, 
September  12th  and  13th,  through  Pullman  cars  will  leave  Chicago, 

St.  Louis,  Detroit,  Cincinnati  and  Cleveland  on  Thursday,  September 
11th,  arriving  Atlantic  City  on  Friday  morning  September  12th. 

For  those  attending  the  NAB  Convention  through  cars  will 
leave  the  same  cities  on  Saturday,  September  13th  arriving  Atlantic 
City  Sunday  morning  September  14th. 


A  survey  made  by  Colliery's  revealed  that  over  1,341,000 
families  of  the  magazine* s  readers  will  buy  about  1,530,000  radios 
next  year  at  acash  outlay  of  $193,000,000. 

The  survey  showed  that  nearly  half  (48$)  would  buy  a  new 
set  in  1947;  49,3$  will  buy  a  console  type  radio-phono,  and  19$  will 
buy  table  combinations. 

About  1,078,000  families  expressed  interest  in  having  a 
set  with  FM.  297,000  readers  would  include  television  receivers  in 
their  buying  plans. 

Messages  of  RCA  Communications,  Inc.,  to  and  from  overseas 
points  now  are  processed  by  automatic  machines  through  such  gatew^r 
cities  as  New  York,  London,  San  Francisco  and  Manila,  without  delay. 

"This  advanced  technique  in  international  radiotelegraphy 
is  the  result  of  wartime  research  and  development”,  says  an  RCAC 
statement.  "It  gives  to  private  messages  the  same  speed,  accuracy 
and  dependability  which  were  attained  through  its  worldr-wide  use 
by  the  U.  S,  Army  Communications  Service  during  the  war. ” 

Five  stations,  including  a  new  10,000  watt  outlet  now 
under  construction  in  Albany,  N. Y. ,  soon  will  affiliate  with  the 
American  Broadcasting  Company  as  the  network  continues  to  expand 
and  improve  its  coverage  of  the  leading  retail  markets  of  the 
country. 

Effective  December  1,  Station  WRWR,  a  new  station  now 
under  construction  in  Albany  joins  A3C  replacing  WOKO.  In  addition, 
two  5,000  watt  stations  also  will  join  ABC  before  the  close  of  the 
year,  -  KFDF  now  building  in  Wichita  Falls,  Tex.,  and  Station  WRUN 
of  Utica,  N.  Y.  Addition  of  these  stations  brings  the  total  number 
of  A3C  affiliates  to  260. 


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Hejnl  Radio  News  Service 


7/30/47 


Westinghouse  expects  to  have  Its  first  television  sets 
in  the  hands  of  the  dealers  by  November  1st. 


The  Garod  Radio  Corporation  has  a  new  portable  model 
which  weighs  only  3-|  pounds.  It  is  a  four  tube  superhet  to  sell  at 
$29.  95  less  batteries. 

Garod,  which  expects  to  spend  $500,000  in  advertising 
this  year  exhibited  its  new  television  console  in  New  York  this 
week.  The  set  complete  with  AM-FM  and  short  wave  radio  reception 
facilities  as  well  as  an  automatic  phonograph,  will  sell  at  less 
than  $700  and  will  be  ready  for  delivery  to  dealers  late  in 
September. 

A  new  technical  reference  folder,  designed  especially  for 
the  nearly  100,000  radio  hams  in  this  country  and  containing  a 
roundup  of  tube  information,  has  Just  been  Issued  by  the  RCA  Tube 
Department, 

Titled  "Headliners  for  Hams”,  the  new  folder  is  a  combina¬ 
tion  technical  bulletin,  price  list,  catalogue,  and  sales  brochure. 
It  contains  valuable  design  information,  and  covers  a  selected  group 
of  RCA* s  most  popular  amateur  tubes. 

Information  in  the  colorful  three-page  folder  includes 
new  ratings  on  the  RCA  807,  808,  810,  813  and  829-B;  new  operating 
conditions  for  frequency  doublers,  and  new  data  on  modulators. 

The  new  folder  is  available  free  from  RCA  tube  distribu¬ 
tors  or  the  Commercial  Engineering  Section  of  the  RCA  Tube  Depart¬ 
ment,  Harrison,  N.  J. 


Two  cousins  were  reenacting  a  murder  drama  they  had  heard 
on  the  radio  a  few  moments  before,  according  to  an  Associated  Press 
dispatch  from  Middletown,  N.  J.  Assistant  Monmouth  County  prosecu¬ 
tor  John  M.  pillsbury  reconstructed  the  re-enactment: 

"Get  ’em  up,  this  is  a  stickup",  ordered  the  younger  boy, 
13,  to  Ephametius  Buffaloe,  17,  in  the  dining  room  of  their  grand¬ 
mother’s  home.  He  was  standing  behind  his  cousin,  Just  like  the 
gunman  in  the  drama. 

"Okay,  you  asked  for  it",  the  13-year-old  boy  said,  and 
he  pulled  the  trigger  of  the  . 3B-caliber  revolver  he  had  found  in 
a  drawer.  Ephametius  fell  dead. 

Shortwave  operators  at  the  Bethany  transmitters  of  the 
Crosley  Broadcasting  Corporation  were  working  a  ham  operator  aboard 
a  ship  some  150  miles  west  of  Havana  in  the  Gulf  of  Mexico  the  other 
day. 

The  ham  told  Crosley  engineers  that  he  had  Just  heard  WLWA, 
the  corporation’s  M  outlet  in  Cincinnati.  To  document  hie  state¬ 
ment,  the  amateur  operator  named  the  frequency  and  channel  used  by 
WLWA  as  well  as  the  exact  sign  on  time  and  title  of  the  program  he 
had  heardj 

And  they  say  frequency  modulation  has  "limited"  coverage,’ 
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Founded  in  1924 


HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 


Radio  —  Television 

—  FM  - 

Communications 

2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 

Washington  8,  D.  C. 

Robert 

D.  Heinl,  Editor 

INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  AUGUST  6,  1947 

m  TRAMMELL 

Congressional  Junkets  Abroad  Hold  "Voice  Of  America"  Fate . 1 

Railroads  May  Need  100,000  Radio  Transmitters;  Many  Uses . 3 

Hughes  Hearings  Give  'Recorded  Broadcasts  Their  Big  Chance . 4 

Niles  Trammell  Reorganizes  NBC  Staff;  Judge  Ashby  Retires . 5 

FCC  Authorizes  Overseas  Radio,  Cable  Rate  Increase . 6 

Drew  Pearson's  Brother  Pinch-Hits  And  Swats  The  Ball . ...7 

Almost  Makes  You  See  The  FM  Stations  Growing . . . 7 

Army  Air  Forces  To  Use  Facsimile  For  Most  Everything . ...8 

Amateur  Radio  Frequency  Bands;  Types  Of  Emission,  Defined . ••.9 

Industry  Service  Laboratory,  Aims  To  Assist  Manufacturers... . 10 

Britain  Plans  To  Expand  Television  Reception  Area . 10 

Experimental  Radar  Reflectors  For  Buoys  prove  Successful. ....... ,11 

Gen.  Chennault 1  s  Censored  Address  Sought  For  U.  S.  Radio . 11 

Scissors  And  paste . . . .....12 

Trade  Notes . . . 14 


No.  1786 


NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  INC. 

general  library 

«n  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK,  N.  • 


V  r . . 


•  ul 


J 


August  6,  1947 


CONGRESSIONAL  JUNKETS  ABROAD  HOLD  “VOICE  OF  AMERICA"  FATE 


Despite  please  from  Assistant  Secretary  of  State  William 
Benton  and  what  appears  to  be  a  continuous  bombardment  of  newspaper 
editorials  (one  of  which  suggests  that  Mr.  Benton  resign  forthwith), 
the  future  of  the  "Voice  of  America"  rests  with  the  special  House 
and  Senate  subcommittees  which  are  to  go  to  Europe  to  learn  at  first 
hand  how  the  broadcasts  are  being  received. 

The  House  subcommittee,  headed  by  Representative  Karl 
Mundt  ( R) ,  of  South  Dakota,  author  of  the  Mundt  Bill,  who  is  fight¬ 
ing  to  establish  the  "Voice  of  America"  on  a  permanent  basis,  is 
composed  of  Lawrence  H.  3nith  ( R) ,  Wisconsin,  John  Davis  Lodge  (r), 
of  Connecticut;  pete  Jarman  ( D) ,  of  Alabama,  and  Mike  Mansfield  (D), 
of  Montana. 

Senator  H.  Alexander  Smith  (r),  of  New  Jersey,  is  Chairman 
of  the  Senate  subcommittee,  which  includes  Bourke  5,  Hlckenlooper 
(R),  of  Iowa;  Henry  Cabot  Lodge  (R),  of  Massachusetts;  Carl  A.  Hatch 
(D),  of  New  Mexico  and  Alben  W.  Barkley  (D),  of  Kentucky. 

Secretary  3enton,  who  answered  a  question  as  to  whether  or 
not  he  would  resign  soon  by  saying  he  would  carry  on  the  program 
"as  long  as  I  am  useful",  said  he  was  glad  the  special  Congressional 
Committees  would  go  abroad  to  Investigate  the  foreign  policy  of  his 
agency.  "I  feel  confident",  he  added,  "that  they  will  return  convinc¬ 
ed  of  the  need  for  giving  to  the  rest  of  the  world  a  full  and  fair 
picture  of  America.  " 

Staffs  of  the  radio  service  will  be  cut  from  1,013  to  649 
in  Washington  and  New  York  and  from  1,313  to  897  overseas. 

Calling  for  the  resignation  of  Secretary  Benton,  the 
Washington  Star  said  last  week: 

"If  Congress  is  to  approve  the  "Voice  of  America and 
State  Department  information  program  continual  ce  next  year,  several 
things  need  to  be  done.  Assistant  Secretary  of  State  Benton  has 
not  been  able  to  make  his  program  stick  and  should  be  replaced  with 
one  who  can  at  least  make  a  fresh  start.  Some  of  the  improvised 
Informational  programs  hurriedly  and  expensively  thrown  together 
during  the  war  got  a  bad  name  for  themselves  and  the  State  Depart¬ 
ments  program  should  be  disassociated  completely  from  the  relics  of 
those  services.  We  should  authorize  by  statute  what  we  plan  to  do, 
and  stop  trying  to  delude  ourselves  into  a  belief  that  what  we  plan 
to  do  is  not  propaganda.  If  those  whom  we  trust  to  conduct  our 
foreign  relatione  believe  that  an  American  campaign  of  propaganda 
abroad  is  a  necessary  modem  weapon  for  peace  as  well  as  for  war, 
then  we  should  perfect  the  best  weapon  of  the  sort  or  put  our  for¬ 
eign  relations  under  those  who  eschew  propaganda  and  forget  about  it. 
As  it  is,  we  are  apt  to  make  ourselves  ridiculous,  instead  of  believ¬ 
ed,  through  the  ‘Voice  of  America.*" 


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8/6/47 


The  New  York  Times  commented. 

"The  ^ost1  of  the  economy  practiced  by  Congress  on  the 
State  Department* 6  Information  end  Cultural  Program  has  now  been 
partially  spelled  out  by  Assistant  Secretary  William  Benton.  That 
part  of  the  program  dealing  with  Russia  is  to  be  continued  -  the 
magazine  * Amerika*  and  the  broadcasts.  Elsewhere  sharp  cutbacks 
have  had  to  be  made.  There  undoubtedly  will  be  more.  There  is  no 
way  to  make  a  $12,000,000  budget  cover  a  $31,000,000  program, 

"It  is  hoped  that  the  various  Congressional  committees 
that  will  be  touring  foreign  countries  between  sessions  will  take 
the  trouble  to  inquire  into  the  situation.  We  believe  they  will 
gain  a  new  appreciation  of  the  importance  of  the  program  that  has 
been  carried  on, 

"The  State  Department  Information  and  Cultural  Program 
was  a  medium  for  explaining  U.  S.  policies  as  well  to  the  people 
of  the  world.  That  was  the  voice  that  Congress  muted,  the  one  that 
spoke  to  the  people,  " 

The  Washington  Post  hammers  away  with: 

"By  adroit  reprogramming  the  State  Department  fortunately 
is  able  to  minimize  the  damage  to  the  Voice  of  America  caused  by 
Congressional  penury.  *  *  *  * 

"It  thus  is  possible  that  the  40  per  cent  slash  in  broad¬ 
cast  scope  may  not  be  quite  so  c  rippling  as  had  been  anticipated. 
Providing  that  quality  can  be  maintained,  it  is  even  possible  that 
the  e  conomy  may  cut  out  some  dead  wood.  But  let  no  one  think  that 
other  portions  of  the  foreign  information  and  education  program,  of 
equal  importance  with  the  Voice  of  America  in  presenting  a  balanced 
picture  of  this  country,  have  escaped  so  easily.  The  over-all 
operation  has  been  cut  approximately  45  per  cent.*  *  *  *  *  Finally, 
funds  for  the  work  of  overseas  cultural  and  information  officers, 
so  essential  to  implement  other  phases  of  the  program,  have  been 
cut  a  whopping  60  per  cent.  There  is  a  chance  to  redeem  the  damage 
through  the  Congressional  investigations  voted  separately  by  the 
Senate  and  House.  " 

In  the  meantime  it  was  reported  from  Moscow  that  the 
second  midnight  "Voice  of  America"  broadcast  was  heard  "fairly 
clearly"  in  Russia.  Although  the  musical  portion  was  distorted  by 
interference,  the  dispatch  said,  the  news  was  clearly  audible. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

Radiotelephone  service  between  Shanghai,  Nanking,  and  all 
cities  in  the  United  States  is  now  available  for  public  use,  accord¬ 
ing  to  the  American  Consulate  General  at  Shanghai. 

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He  ini  Radio  News  Service 


8/6/47 


RAILROADS  MAY  NEED  100,000  RADIO  TRANSMITTERS;  MANY  USES 


Railroad  spokesmen  have  estimated  that  within  the  next 
10  years  railroads  may  require  75,000  to  100,000  radio  transmitters, 
according  to  the  Federal  Communications  Commission.  This  is  based 
upon  the  fact  there  are  some  46,000  locomotives  and  cabooses  alone, 
not  to  mention  need  for  land  stations,  utility  vehicle  equipment, 
and  portable  apparatus. 

Per  the  first  time  in  American  railroad  history,  starting 
August  15,  it  will  be  possible  for  the  general  public  to  telephone 
to  and  from  moving  trains,  the  FCC  advises.  This  is  provided  for 
in  tariffs  filed  with  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  by 
various  Bell  telephone  companies  to  cover  experimental  service  of 
this  nature  on  several  crack  trains  of  the  Pennsylvania  and  Balti¬ 
more  &  Ohio  railroads  operating  between  New  York  and  Washington. 

It  is  part  of  the  Bell  system’s  participation  in  the  program  to 
bring  the  telephone  network  within  reach  of  persons  on  trains,  auto¬ 
mobiles,  airplanes  and  boats. 

Another  pioneer  undertaking  is  the  application  of  the 
Chesapeake  &  Ohio  Railway  Co.  for  authority  to  construct  and  operate 
a  system  which  would  offer  induction  public  telephone  service  with 
certain  of  its  passenger  trains  enroute  between  Orange,  Va. ,  and 
Cincinnati,  Ohio.  This  is  the  first  application  of  its  kind.  The 
estimated  cost  is  $353,900.  The  railroad  is  of  the  opinion  that 
"although  direct  telephone  revenues  may  not  result  in  an  immediate 
profit  to  the  applicant,  the  overall  benefits  of  the  project  will 
result  in  increased  revenues  from  applicant's  transportation  busi¬ 
ness,  and  will,  therefore,  be  economically  Justified". 

Already  there  is  an  established  radio  service  for  use  by 
railroad  personnel  exclusively.  Knoim  as  the  "Railroad  Radio  Seiv 
vlce  ",  it  covers  utilization  of  radio  as  an  aid  to  train  operation 
and  yard  and  terminal  traffic  control.  About  100  authorizations 
in  this  category  contribute  to  the  safety  and  efficiency  of  rail 
operations.  This  figure  represents  some  75  land  stations  and  700 
mobile  units,  since  a  single  grant  may  cover  from  one  to  a  hundred 
radio  installations  on  engines  and  cars. 

Sixty  frequencies  between  158.37  and  161.91  megacycles 
are  allocated  for  this  type  of  railroad  radio  use.  Fifty-four  of 
these  channels  can  be  employed  for  yard  and  terminal  traffic  con¬ 
trol,  since  that  is  the  most  popular  application  at  this  time.  Dir¬ 
ect  radio  links  between  the  dispatcher's  office  and  switch  engines 
speed  the  movement  of  rolling  stock  and  tend  to  reduce  cost  of  handl¬ 
ing.  This  kind  of  operation  requires  relatively  little  change  in 
established  practices  other  than  the  introduction  of  radio  equipment. 

Radio  systems  along  the  right-of-way  are  more  expensive  to 
install  and  maintain,  and  their  use  must  be  coordinated  with  the 
manual  or  automatic  block  signal  systems  existing  on  slightly  more 
than  half  of  the  main  trackage  of  the  nation.  However,  it  is  this 

-  3  - 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/6/47 


latter  type  of  radio  service  which,  because  of  the  increased  element 
of  safety,  is  believed  due  to  become  the  most  important  adaptation 
of  radio  by  the  railroad  industry.  Accordingly,  this  class  of  sta¬ 
tion  is  given  priority  in  frequency  assignments  by  the  Commission  on 
the  60  channels,  a  policy  which  has  the  indorsement  of  the  Associ¬ 
ation  of  American  Railroads. 

Tests  on  one  western  railroad  demonstrated  the  advantage 
of  the  radiotelephone  for  communication  between  locomotives  out  of 
sight  of  each  other  on  the  opposite  ends  of  a  long  train  proceeding 
around  mountain  curves.  It  made  it  possible  to  start  and  stop  the 
train  smoothly  although  the  engines  were  half  a  mile  apart.  Also, 
when  a  mishap  occurs  in  an  isolated  spot,  far  removed  from  wire  line 
facilities,  the  radio-equipped  train  can  warn  approaching  trains 
and,  at  the  same  time,  summon  aid.  With  radio,  one  train  can  flash 
word  to  a  passing  train  that  the  latter  has  a  hot  box,  etc.  Or, 
by  the  same  means,  an  engineer  and  a  conductor  separated  on  a  mile- 
long  freight  train  are  in  instant  contact  with  each  other. 

The  Chicago,  Burlington  &  Quincy  Railroad,  for  example, 
is  employing  radio  for  end-to-end  communication  on  long  freight 
trains.  It  is  said  to  save  from  three  to  four  hours  in  operating 
between  Chicago  and  Denver.  There  is  a  high  proportion  of  radio  use 
by  other  lines  in  yard  and  terminal  areas.  Data  of  the  Association 
of  American  Railroads  indicate  that  yard  radio  communication  systems 
may  save  from  4  to  12  percent  of  the  total  annual  operating  cost  of 
the  yard.  Some  of  these  radio  installations  have  paid  for  them¬ 
selves  during  the  first  year  of  operation. 

Microwave  experimentation  has  potential  application  to 
railroad  as  well  as  other  fields.  The  Chicago,  Rock  Island  and 
Pacific  Railroad  has  done  some  experimental  work  looking  toward  pos¬ 
sible  replacement  of  its  wire  telegraph  lines  with  microwave  relay 
linkes. 

Some  railroads  are  using  a  portable  apparatus  known  as 
the  "carry-phone  "  for  transmitting  and  receiving  messages  through 
the  track,  a  modernization  of  the  inductive  telephone  system.  It 
provides  short-distance  communication  with  engines,  freight  car 
crews,  and  control  towers. 

XXXXXXXX 

HUC-HES  HEARINGS  GIVE  RECORDED  BROADCASTS  THEIR  BIG  CHANCE 

Yfire  recordings  of  verbatim  testimony  of  the  hearings  of 
the  Senate  War  Investigating  Sub- Committee  delving  into  airplane 
activities  of  Howard  Hughes  were  broadcast  by  Stations  WMAL  (ABC), 
WOL  (MBS)  and  Y/TOP  (CBS)  in  Washington.  A  cL  imax  of  these  proceed¬ 
ings  was  last  Tuesday  (August  5)  when  Elliott  Roosevelt  was  on  the 
staid  five  hours.  The  wire  recorders,  of  course,  didn*t  miss  a 
thing  and  the  highlights  were  later  re  broadcast  by  the  stations  aid 
the  networks. 


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A  request  was  made  of  the  Senate  Committee  for  a  uliven 
television  broadcast  but  this  was  turned  down.  The  Committee  was 
willing  that  moving  picture  films  taken  at  the  hearing  be  televised 
but  would  not  consent  to  a  "live"  version. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

NILES  TRAMMELL  REORGANIZES  NBC  STAFF;  JUDGE  ASHBY  RETIRES 

In  a  sweeping  realignment  of  the  National  Broadcasting 
Company  executive  organization,  Niles  Trammell,  president,  last 
week  promoted  the  following: 

Harry  C.  Kopf,  Ken  R.  Dyke,  John  H.  MacDonald  named 
Administrative  Vice-Presidents;  I.  E.  Showerman  new  Vice-president; 
George  H.  Frey  and  Janes  M.  Gaines. 

At  the  same  time  Mr.  Tranmell  announced  the  retirement 
of  A.  L.  Ashby,  the  NBC  Vice-President  and  General  Counsel.  Judge 
Ashby,  however,  will  continue  to  act  as  an  advisor  to  the  company 
on  legal  matters. 

A  native  of  Wisconsin  and  former  professor  of  law  and 
finance  at  the  University  of  Pittsburgh,  Mr.  Ashby  has  served  as 
Vice-President  and  General  Counsel  of  NBC  since  1929.  Before  that 
he  was  Assistant  General  Counsel  of  Westinghouse  Electric  &  Mfg.  Co, 
Judge  Ashby  is  the  aithor  of  numerous  brochures,  one  of  them  being 
"Legal  Aspects  of  Radio  Broadcasting ". 

Henry  Ladner  has  been  designated  as  Acting  General  Counsel 

of  NBC. 


Mr.  Kopf,  formerly  Vice-President  in  Charge  of  Sales,  was 
appointed  Administrative  Vice-president  in  Charge  of  Network  Sales, 
National  Spot  Saes,  Owned  and  Operated  Stevtions  and  Station  Relations. 
George  H.  Frey  was  named  Director  of  Network  Seles. 

Mr.  Eyck  was  appointed  program  head  of  the  NBC.  He  suc¬ 
ceeds  Clarence  L.  Menser,  who  recently  figured  in  a  disagreement  with 
Fred  Allen  on  the  subject  of  radio  vice-presidents  and  network  censor¬ 
ship. 


John  H.  MacDonald,  formerly  Vice-President  in  charge  of 
Finance,  was  appointed  Administrative  Vice-President  also.  I.  E. 
Showerman,  formerly  Bfanager  of  the  Central  Division,  was  elected 
Vice-president  in  Charge  of  the  Central  Division. 

Mr.  Gaines  was  named  Director  of  Owned  and  Operated  Sta¬ 
tions  and  will  continue  as  Manager  of  Station  WN3C. 

Commenting  on  the  realignment  of  the  company’s  executive 
staff,  president  Trammell  stated,  "Our  objective  in  reorganizing 
the  administration  of  the  company’s  activities  is  to  further  improve 
our  operating  efficiency.  The  many  pressing  problems  in  this 

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post-war  era,  together  with  our  expansion  into  the  field  of  televi¬ 
sion,  have  placed  additional  responsibilities  upon  our  executives. 

We  expect  that  the  Administrative  Vice-Presidents  will  assume  res¬ 
ponsibility  for  the  company* s  day-to-day  operations,  thereby  enabling 
the  Executive  Vice  President,  Mr.  Frank  E.  Mullen,  an  d  myself  to 
devote  more  of  our  time  to  over-all  management  affairs  and  the  prob¬ 
lems  of  expansion,  particularly  in  the  new  field  of  television 
broadcasting. 

nI  want  to  express  our  thanks  aid  appreciation  to  Judge 
Ashby  for  his  long  years  of  service  and  to  Mr.  Menser  likewise  for 
the  contributions  they  have  made  to  the  success  of  the  National 
Broadcasting  Company.  " 


XXXXXXXXX 

FCC  AUTHORIZES  OVERSEAS  RADIO,  CABLE  RATE  INCREASE 

Something  like  85,800,000  will  be  added  to  the  annual 
revenue  of  United  States  international  cable  and  radiotelegraph  ser¬ 
vices  as  a  result  of  a  general  increase  in  rates  authorized  last 
week  by  the  Federal  Communications  Commission, 

This  action  climaxed  a  Commission  investigation,  institut¬ 
ed  last  March,  in  which  the  carriers  stressed  the  need  for  addition¬ 
al  income  to  meet  a  decline  in  net  earnings. 

The  au thorization  permits  rates  on  messages  from  the  con¬ 
tinental  United  States  to  Central  and  South  America  to  be  increased 
from  20  to  22  cents  per  full  rate  word;  to  Europe  (Including  the 
United  Kingdom,  Eire,  Turkey  and  the  USSR),  from  20  to  25  cents;  to 
trans-Pacific  points  (except  Hawaii),  from  20  to  30  cents;  and  to 
Oahu,  T.H.  ,  and  Cuba,  from  12  and  15-20  cents,  respectively,  to  20 
cents.  Increases  are  also  authorized  in  rates  from  various  United 
States  territories  and  possessions.  However,  no  Increases  are 
authorized  to  points  to  which  a  full  rate  of30  cents  per  word  now 
applie  s. 


The  carriers  involved  include  RCA  Communications,  Inc.; 

.411  America  Cables  and  Radio,  Inc.  ;  Mackay  Radio  and  Telegraph  Co.  ; 
The  Commercial  Cable  Co,;  Commercial  Pacific  Cable  Co.;  The  Western 
Union  Telegraph  Co.;  Press  Wireless,  Inc.;  Tropical  Radio  Telegraph 
Co.  ;  and  Globe  Wireless,  Ltd, 

On  the  basis  of  the  hearings  in  this  proceeding,  the  Com¬ 
mission  is  '’thoroughly  satisfied  with  respect  to  the  urgent  need  of 
some  of  the  United  States  carriers  for  additional  revenues"  and, 
further,  that  "substantial  rate  relief  can  be  immediately  afforded 
which  will  serve  to  alleviate  the  urgency  of  the  situation  but  which 
would  still  be  within  the  limits  of  reasonableness".  However,  the 
Commission  "intends  to  maintain  a  close  watch  on  the  operating  re¬ 
sults  of  the  respondent  carriers  after  these  rate  increases  have  be¬ 
come  effective,  in  order  to  be  in  a  position  to  take  promptly  any 
further  action  that  may  be  appropriate. " 


XXXXXXXXX 

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8/6/47 


DREW  PEARSON'S  BROTHER  PINCH-HITS  AND  SWATS  THE  BALL 


Quite  a  little  favorable  comment  has  been  heard  in  Wash¬ 
ington  regarding  Leon  M.  Pearson  who  is  pinch-hitting  Sunday  nights 
over  ABC  for  his  brother  Drew  Pearson  now  on  vacation.  Leon,  also 
a  radio  commentator,  speaks  briskly  (however  not  as  brisk  as  Drew 
or  Walter  Winchell),  is  brief  and  direct.  At  times  he  reminds  the 
listener  of  his  brother,  then  again  he  doesn't. 

Instead  of  copying  the  well  known  feature  "prediction  of 
Things  to  Come",  Leon  Pearson  substitutes  views  of  well  known  men 
on  some  topic  of  current  interest.  On  his  broadcast  last  Sunday 
night  one  was  the  Howard  Hughes- Senate  War  Expenditure  Investigation. 
Those  quoted  by  Mr.  Pearson  were  Senators  Ferguson  ( R) ,  of  Michigan, 
Brewster  (R),  of  Maine,  and  pepper  (D),  of  Florida.  An  effort  was 
made  to  give  all  angles  in  a  brief  space  of  time  and  in  this  Mr. 
Pearson  proved  very  successful. 

The  Pearson  brothers  were  born  in  Evanston,  Illinois; 

Drew  in  1897  and  Leon  in  1899,  Leon  graduated  with  an  A3  at 
Swart hmo re  College  in  1920  and  an  A.M.  at  Harvard  in  1922.  He  was 
previously  associated  with  Drew  Pearson  and  Robert  S.  Allen  and  is 
the  author  of  several  plays. 

Leon  Pearson  at  present  Is  on  leave  as  head  of  the 
International  News  Service  Bureau  in  Paris. 

Drew  Pearson  was  mentioned  this  week  as  being  interested 
In  purchasing  Station  WQQW,  Washington's  "Blue  Book"  station 
reportedly  for  sale.  WQQW,  according  to  one  news  source  is  8180,000 
in  the  red  and  the  purchase  figure  mentioned  in  connection  with  Mr. 
Pearson  is  $110,000. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

ALMOST  MAKES  YOU  SEE  THE  FM  STATIONS  GROWING 

At  the  outbreak  of  war  there  were  44  FM  stations  on  the 
air  and  an  additional  four  authorized  by  the  Federal  Communications 
Commission,  making  a  total  of  48,  J.  N.  (Bill)  Bailey,  Executive 
Director  of  the  FM  Association  told  the  Dealers  Group  of  the  Gas 
and  Electric  Association  of  New  York  recently.  On  October  23,  1946  - 
a  little  less  than  eight  months  ago  -  there  were  66  FM  Stations  in 
operation. 

"There  are  now  232  FM  stations  in  operation",  Mr.  Bailey 
continued.  "That's  an  increase  of  more  than  250  percent  in  less 
than  eight  months.  In  addition,  the  Commission  has  authorized  for 
construction  within  eight  months  after  such  authorization,  659  other 
stations.  Pending  before  the  FCC  are  170  applications,  making  a 
total  of  1,061  potential  FM  stations  within  a  year.  " 

XXXXXXXXXX 

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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


8/6/47 


AMY  AIR  FORCES  TO  USE  FACSIMILE  FOR  MOST  EVERYTHING 


The  U.  S.  An ny  Air  Forces  are  planning  to  use  facsimile 
equipment,  a  form  of  visual  message  presentation  quite  similar  to 
television,  so  that  aircraft  in  flight  can  receive  weather  maps, 
pictures,  enemy  troop  locations,  and  printed  types  of  information, 
according  to  Trig.  General  F.  L.  Ankenbrandt  of  Washington,  D.  C. , 
Chief  Air  Communications  officer  of  the  AAF.  He  spoke  in  Schenect¬ 
ady  on  the  General  Electric  Science  Forum. 

"The  Air  Forces  have  as  an  objective  the  development  of  a 
light-weight,  rugged  facsimile  equipment  which  will  provide  high 
operating  speeds ",  General  Ankerbrandt  pointed  out  in  the  broadcast 
over  WGY  and  WGFM.  He  sai  d  that  other  forms  of  automatic  and  visual 
message  transmission  systems  under  development  are  teletype,  and 
symbol  and  light  signal  displays. 

'Wife  are  developing  a  great  many  devices  which  show  promise 
of  minimizing  the  effects  of  noise  on  our  aircraft  communication 
systems",  the  speaker  continued.  "We  have  found  most  types  of  atmos¬ 
pheric  noise  to  be  practically  non-existent  in  the  ultra-high  fre¬ 
quency  or  micro-wave  region  of  the  radio  frequency  spectrum.  We 
are,  therefore  placing  an  important  portion  of  our  future  aircraft 
communication  systems  in  this  so-called  microwave  region.  " 

"We  are  doing  everything  possible  to  make  our  communica¬ 
tion  equipments  and  systems  more  reliable",  General  Ankenbrandt 
declared.  "This  Is  especially  important  when  we  consider  the  require¬ 
ments  in  connection  with  the  aircraft  of  the  future  which  we  expect 
to  travle  at  velocities  exceeding  that  of  sound.  As  aircraft  speeds 
increase,  it  is  obvious  that  less  time  is  available  for  communica¬ 
tions.  For  example,  every  word  spoken  into  the  microphone  of  the 
aircraft  transmitter  should  be  instantly  understood  at  the  other 
end  of  the  system  -  there's  no  time  for  repeats.  It  follows,  also, 
that  every  communication  intended  for  the  aircraft  must  be  reliably 
received  immediately  upon  transmission. " 

Future  airborne  equipments  will  be  designed  for  fully 
automatic  operation,  according  to  General  Ankenbrandt.  "By  automatic 
operation",  he  explained,  "I  mean  that  if  the  pilot  of  the  aircraft 
wishes  to  talk  to  agiven  station  *  A' ,  for  example,  he  simply  turns  a 
selector  switch  to  a  position  marked  'Station  A'.  The  complete  tun¬ 
ing  and  adjustment  of  the  radio  receiving  and  transmitting  equipment 
to  the  frequency  of  Station  *A'  are  done  automatically  without  any 
further  work  on  the  part  of  the  pilot.  " 

The  general  problem  of  airborne  equipment  design  is  com¬ 
plicated  by  the  fact  that  it  must  operate  under  a  very  wide  variety 
of  climatic  conditions",  he  continued.  "The  eqiipment  must  provide 
reliable  operation  both  in  the  polar  regions  and  at  the  Equator.  It 
must  not  falter  whether  the  climate  is  very  dry  or  very  humid.  Also, 
it  must  provide  continuous  communications  whether  the  aircraft  is 
flying  at  an  altitude  of  50,000  feet,  where  the  atmosphere  is  very 
rare,  or  near  the  surface  of  the  earth  where  it  is  much  denser.  " 

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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/6/47 


AMATEUR  RADIO  FREQUENCY  BANDS;  TYPES  OF  EMISSION,  DEFINED 


The  adoption  of  its  Order  130-p,  cancelling  and  replacing 
previous  orders  of  the  130  series,  which  specified  the  frequencies 
and  types  of  emission  available  for  operation  of  amateur  radio  sta¬ 
tions  was  announced  Monday  by  the  Federal  Communications  Commission. 
Tnis  order  includes  the  authorization  for  use  of  the  band  5650-5925 
Me.,  which  the  Commission  recently  allocated  to  replace  the  amateur 
band  5650-5850  Me.  The  allocation  of  the  wider  band  contained  a 
qualification  to  the  effect  that  amateur  operations  between  5775  aid 
5925  Me  are  subject  to  such  interference  as  may  result  from  the  oper¬ 
ation  of  industrial,  scientific  and  medical  devices  assigned  to  the 
frequency  5850  Me. 

The  Order  also  authorizes  the  use  of  narrow  band  frequency 
modulation  for  radiotelephony  in  the  bands  3850-3900  kc.  and  14,200- 
14,250  kc.  by  Class  A  amateur  radio  operators  at  stations  licensed 
to  the  holders  of  Class  A  amateur  radio  operator  licenses.  In  addi¬ 
tion  the  holder  of  any  class  of  amateur  radio  operator  license  is 
authorized  to  use  narrow  band  FM  radiotelephony  at  any  licensed 
amateur  radio  station  on  frequencies  from  28.5  to  29.0  ne  ga cycles 
and  f  rom  51  to  52.5  megacycles. 

This  authorization  is  on  an  experimental  basis  until  fur¬ 
ther  order  of  the  Commission,  but  in  no  event  beyond  August  1,  1948. 
The  purpose  is  to  determine  whether  or  not  it  is  practical  for  nar¬ 
row  band  frequency  modulation  and  the  conventional  amplitude  modu¬ 
lation  (AM)  to  operate  within  the  same  portions  of  the  amateur 
phone  bands,  particularly  in  the  lower  two  heavily-occupied  phone 
bands.  In  addition,  it  is  desired  to  determine  under  practical 
operating  conditions,  the  advantages  and  disadvantages  of  NBFM  as 
compared  to  conventional  AM.  Experience  has  already  shown  that  in 
many  cases  where  amplitude  modulated  amateur  signals  caused  inter¬ 
ference  to  broadcast  reception,  such  interference  was  completely 
eliminated  when  the  involved  amateur  station  changed  over  to  narrow 
band  frequency  modulation. 

The  Commission  stresses  the  fact  that  this  authorization 
is  on  a  temporary  experimental  basis,  subject  to  cancellation  at  any 
time,  if  after  a  reasonable  trial  period,  experience  shows  that  NBFM 
is  not  desirable  in  portions  of  the  amateur  phone  bands  also  occupied 
by  amplitude  modulated  amateur  signals. 

At  the  expiration  date  of  this  order,  the  specified  fre¬ 
quencies  revert  to  the  status  indicated  in  paragraph  A  of  the  Order, 
unless,  as  aresult  of  the  experimental  program,  the  determination  is 
made  that  a  permanent  change  with  respect  to  the  use  of  NBFM  should 
be  made  in  the  amateur  bands.  In  arriving  at  this  determination, 
the  amateurs  will  be  accorded  full  opportunity  to  express  their 
desires. 


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He ini  Radio  News  Service 


8/6/47 


INDUSTRY  SERVICE  LABORATORY  AIMS  TO  ASSIST  MANUFACTURERS 


A  new  booklet  HRCA  Service  to  the  Radio  Industry w  traces 
the  history  of  the  RCA  Industry  Service  Laboratory  and  its  increas¬ 
ing  value  to  radio  manufacturers  as  well  as  the  general  public. 

The  functions  of  the  Laboratory  from  the  time  of  its 
foundation  in  1930  have  included  the  following  main  points  of 
endeavor: 

1.  To  serve  as  aclearing  house  for  radio  technical  information. 

2.  To  act  as  a  consultation  and  counseling  service  on  develop¬ 

ment,  design  and  production. 

3.  To  function  as  atesting  agency  for  radio  tubes  and  electron¬ 

ic  equipment. 

4.  To  develop  new  and  technical  concepts  for  rapid  application. 

5.  To  make  available  to  the  radio  industry  advanced  informa¬ 

tion  on  RCA  work  in  developing  new  techniques  and 

improvements. 

X  X  X  X  XXXXXX 

BRITAIN  PLANS  TO  EXPAND  TELEVISION  RECEPTION  AREA 

England  is  making  strides  to  increase  the  area  for  the 
reception  of  television,  according  to  the  American  Embassy  in  London. 

The  use  of  coaxial  cable  is  costly  construction,  and  ”bean  11 
television  by  the  use  of  ’’reflector”  stations  is  England1  s  answer 
for  the  expansion  of  the  scope  of  television  reception. 

The  first  installation  of  this  type  will  be  between  London 
and  Birmingham,  a  distance  of  112  miles.  The  effective  range  of  a 
17- kilowatt  vision  transmitter,  such  as  that  installed  at  Alexahdra 
Palace  in  London,  is  approximately  35  miles.  Four  such  reflector 
stations  will  be  required  according  to  technicians  -  spacing  them 
about  20  miles  apart.  The  locations  of  these  repeater  points,  al¬ 
though  selected,  have  not  yet  been  announced. 

Each  station  will  be  a  20^- foot- square  building  of  stone, 
topped  with  an  80-foot  radio  mast.  The  repeater  stations  will  have 
no  staff,  technical  or  otherwise,  and  will  have  only  a  fence  to 
separate  them  from  the  outside  world.  The  station  will  automati¬ 
cally  send  out  its  own  warning  signal  in  the  event  a  break-down 
threatens. 

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He  ini  Radio  News  Service 


8/6/47 


EXPERIMENTAL  RADAR  REFLECTORS  FOR  BUOYS  PROVE  SUCCESSFUL 


The  Coast  Guard  has  developed  and  successfully  demonstrat¬ 
ed  an  experimental  device  to  improve  the  usefulness  of  buoys  and 
channel  markers  as  aids  to  navigation  for  the  rapidly  growing  number 
of  vessels  now  using  radar  equipment.  The  new  device,  termed  a 
"radar  reflector11,  increases  the  strength  of  the  radar  echo  from  the 
ordinary  buoy  structure  and  thus  makes  it  detectable  at  greater  dis¬ 
tance  and  through  worse  conditions  of  interference,  such  as  that 
from  rough,  choppy  seas,  known  as  "sea-clutter"  when  viewed  on  a 
radar  screen. 

The  action  of  the  device  is  similar  to  that  of  a  good  mir¬ 
ror,  properly  pointed  to  reflect  light  flashes  back  to  the  observer 
and  can  be  compared,  in  this  respect,  to  the  familiar  reflectors 
used  on  automobile  highway  signs  and  markers  to  make  them  show  up 
better  when  illuminated  by  automobile  headlights.  Only  in  this  case, 
of  course,  the  felection  is  the  radar  beam  sent  out  from  the  ship, 
returned  by  the  reflector  and  made  visible  to  the  navigator  on  the 
viewing  screen  of  his  radar  equipment. 

XXXXXXXX 

GEN.  CHENNAULT * S  CENSORED  ADDRESS  SOUGHT  FOR  U.  S.  RADIO 

Maj.  Gen.  Claire  L.  Chennault,  wartime  Flying  Tigers 
commander  whose  Air  Force  Day  recorded  address  was  banned  from  broad¬ 
cast  over  the  United  States  Array  station  in  China,  said  in  Shanghai 
Tuesday,  according  to  an  A*?,  dispatch,  that  former  Governor  James  A. 
Noe  of  Louisiana  had  requested  the  recording  for  rebroadcast  in  the 
United  States. 

General  Chennault  said  Governor  Noe  informed  him  the  talk 
would  be  carried  over  Governor  Noe!s  stations  WNOE  at  New  Orleans 
and  KNOE  at  Monroe,  La.;  by  KNET  in  Texas,  and  "possibly  a  few  other 
stations  ". 


He  informed  Governor  Noe  he  understood  his  original  record 
had  been  destroyed,  but  that  he  was  ready  to  make  another  and  air¬ 
mail  it  to  Louisiana. 

Maj.  Gen.  John  ?.  Lucas,  commanding  the  United  States 
military  advisory  group  in  China,  refused  to  permit  the  armed  forces 
radio  station  in  Nanking  to  broadcast  Chennault* s  address,  which 
termed  "penny  wise  and  pound  foolish  conservatism  of  politicians" 
one  of  the  greatest  hazards  to  the  development  of  American  air  power. 
General  Lucas  held  the  talk  was  improper  for  an  official  Array  sta¬ 
tion. 


XXXXXXXX 


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8/6/47 


SCISSORS  AND  PASTE 


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•  • 

*  • 
•  * 

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Another  View  of  ’’The  Hucksters” 

~T«Li  f  e 

As  a  cynically  exaggerated  study  of  big  business  and  big 
advertising  the  new  moving  picture  "The  Hucksters”  has  agood  bit  of 
ginger  to  it.  A  few  radio  commercials  which  figure  in  the  script 
should  make  ad  men  cringe.  *  *  »  # 

With  the  release  of  M-G-M's  movie,  the  ad  game  will  prob¬ 
ably  receive  the  same  sort  of  national  attention  which  The  Grapes  of 
Wrath  won  for  Okies  seven  years  ago.  According  to  The  Hucksters, 
bigtime  advertising  is  entirely  carried  on  by  megalo-  and  dipsoman¬ 
iacs  in  the  high-rental  areas  of  New  York  and  Hollywood,  two  points 
separated  by  three  nights  in  a  Pullman  car  and  100  million  consumers. 

#  #  *<*«**  * 

The  traditional  adornments  of  this  way  of  life  are  $35,000 
salaries,  Lincoln  convertibles,  gin  rummy  for  astonishing  stakes, 
fancy  women  and  country  houses  which  the  owner  is  always  too  busy 
to  visit. 

Confronted  by  this  picture  of  their  industry  hucksters 
themselves  are  inclined  to  be  wistful  rather  than  amazed.  Said  one, 
looking  fondly  at  Deborah  Kerr,  ”Fbot,  Cone  and  Eelding  was  never 
like  this.  11 


Radio- Cow  Senator  Plays  Joke  On  Taft. 

(  ** Washington  Post”) 

Senator  Glen  Taylor  (D),  of  Idaho,  former  ’’radio  cowboy”, 
when  Senator  Taft  (r),  Majority  steersman  was  working  feverishly 
Just  before  the  Senate  adjourned  last  week  sent  for  a  huge  pile  of 
books  and  papers,  which  he  placed  on  his  desk,  along  with  a  lectern. 

To  those  not  in  on  his  scheme,  it  was  obvious  that  he  was 
preparing  for  a  filibuster  that  might  hold  the  Senate  in  session  for 
days. 

However,  Taylor  had  sent  anote  to  the  press  gallery  saying: 

"I  don’t  intend  to  speak,  but  watch  me  drive  Taft  to  dis¬ 
traction  (senatorial  term  for  ’nuts’)  -  Glen  Taylor.” 

When  the  Ohio  Republican  leader  spotted  Taylor’s  desk,  he 
hastened  to  the  Idahoan  and  apparently  pleaded  with  him  not  to  under¬ 
take  a  speech.  Taylor  glared,  angrily  shook  his  head  and  continued 
shuffling  his  papers  as  if  waiting  for  an  opportunity  to  get  the 
floor  and  launch  his  filibuster. 

In  the  press  gallery  it  was  assumed  that  Taft  then  appeal¬ 
ed  to  Democratic  Leader  Alben  W.  Barkley  (Ky. )  to  intercede  with 
Taylor,  for  soon  Leslie  Bif fie , (personal  friend  of  President  Truman,) 
and  Staff  Director  of  the  Minority  Policy  Committee,  was  seen  to 
approach  Taylor  and  converse  earnestly  with  him. 

The  Idahoan  repeated  the  show  he  had  staged  when  Taft  ap¬ 
proached  him,  shaking  his  head  and  giving  every  evidence  of  a  deter¬ 
mination  to  talk  at  great  length  whenever  he  could  obtain  the  floor. 


-  12  - 


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31  - 


He ini  Radio  News  Service 


8/6/47 


RCA  Exhibition  Hall  In  New  York  Draws  Large  Crowds 

(  w Radio  Age  ",  July  1947} 

The  RCA  Exhibition  Hall,  latest  addition  to  New  York’s 
showplaces  for  citizens  and  out-of-town  visitors,  opened  its  doors 
May  i.4  to  the  first  group  of  spectators  who,  since  that  day,  have 
continued  to  throng  the  exhibits  from  morning  to  late  evening.  Be¬ 
fore  the  lights  were  put  out  on  the  opening  day,  more  than  5,000 
guests  had  inspected  the  various  animated  displays  which  portray 
the  widespread  worldwide  activities  of  the  Radio  Corporation  of 
America, 

Behind  the  Hall’s  200-foot  window  front  at  36  W.  49th  St. 
in  Radio  City,  is  displayed  the  wonders  of  modern  electronics  - 
radio,  television,  radar,  global  communications,  electronic  equipment 
and  home  instruments  -  an  exposition  combining  the  gadgetry  of  The 
World  of  Tomorrow  with  the  pageantry  of  Hollywood, 

The  entire  main  floor  of  the  Exhibition  Hall,  from  its 
30-foot  high  laminated  ceiling  to  its  carpeted  floor,  is  visible 
from  the  street.  In  its  high  windows  can  be  seen  giant  models  of 
RCA  tubes  containing  miniatures  of  radio  and  television  receivers, 
sewing  machines,  and  other  electronic  equipment. 

At  the  left  end  of  the  main  floor,  a  IS- foot  high  plexi¬ 
glass  map  of  the  U.  S. ,  shows  in  bright  lights  the  radio  network  of 
the  National  Broadcasting  Company.  By  flicking  buttons  on  an 
accompanying  keyboard,  the  affiliated  stations  light  up  separately, 
while  another  push-button  brings  in  on  a  loudspeaker  the  network 
program  being  broadcast  at  the  moment. 


Joske’s  Radio  Test  Brings  Newspaper  Comeback 

(^Editor  and  Publisher") 


Joske’s  department  store  in  San  Antonio  has  conducted  a 
unique  experiment  in  the  use  of  radio  advertising  by  a  retail  store, 
the  results  of  which  will  be  used  widely  in  radio* s  attempt  to  crash 
the  retail  field.  Joske*e  test  was  well  conducted  under  controlled 
conditions  and  the  store’s  analysis  of  the  results  are  restrained. 
There  is  no  claim  that  radio  was  solely  responsible  for  this  or  that 
increase  in  sales.  It  is  stated  only  that  "radio  contributed  dir¬ 
ectly"  to  these  sales  results. 

Unfortunately,  these  figures  will  be  bandied  about  by 
radio  salesmen  all  over  the  country  and  it  will  be  claimed  that  radio 
did  this  or  that  -  "look  what  it  did  for  Joske’s". 

What  must  be  remembered  by  retailers  and  salesmen  for  all 
media  is  that  radio  was  not  used  alone  in  this  experiment.  News¬ 
paper  advertising  was  continued  for  the  test  departments  and  the 
newspaper  space  was  used  lavishly  to  plug  the  store’s  radio  programs 
in  addition  to  selling  merchandise. 

In  addition,  it  is  wise  to  remember  that  the  test  depart¬ 
ments  were  plugged  for  12  weeks  on  four  daily  radio  programs  and  a 
Sunday  night  news  program  adding  up  to  a  total  of  282  commercials. 


XXXXXXXXXXX 


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8/6/47 


::  TRADE  NOTES 


Some  600  applicants  for  radio  engineer  jobs  in  the 
Federal  Communications  Commission  were  examined  this  week. 


Sailing  on  the  QUEEN  ELIZABETH  last  week,  Senator  Henry 
Cabot  Lodge,  Jr.,  Republican  from  Massachusetts,  a  member  of  the 
Committee  to  investigate  the  "Voice  of  .America”  in  Europe,  made  it 
known  that  he  was  traveling  at  his  own  expense. 


Richard  W.  Hubbell  and  Associates,  Television  Consultants 
of  New  York,  Washington  and  Cincinnati,  have  formed  a  working  agree¬ 
ment  with  Anderson  and  Merryman,  Radio  Consultants,  with  headquarters 
in  New  Orleans. 

Philip  Merryrasn  was  formerly  Manager  of  Planning  and  Devel¬ 
opment  of  the  National  Broadcasting  Company  and  amember  of  the  NBC 
New  York  executive  staff,  resigned  from  NBC  several  months  ago  to 
form  a  partnership  with  H.  V.  Anderson,  consulting  radio  engineer 
of  New  Orleans  and  former  radar  expert  of  the  U.  S.  Navy, 


Senator  Owen  Brewster  ( R) ,  of  Maine,  Chairman  of  the  Sen¬ 
ate  War  Investigating  Committee,  and  a  member  of  the  Interstate 
Comnerce  (Radio)  Committee,  faces  a  battery  of  newspapermen  on  WOR- 
Mutual's  ’’Meet  the  Press”,  Friday,  August  8,  from  10  to  10130  P.M, EDT 
Senator  Brewster  currently  is  making  headlines  in  the  special  sub¬ 
committee  probing  the  $40,000,000  cargo  plane  contract  awarded  Howard 
Hughes  and  Henry  J.  Kaiser. 


The  nationUs  magazines  and  periodicals  reached  a  new  record 
in  unit  and  dollar  saL  es  in  1946,  a  summary  by  the  Magazine  Advertis¬ 
ing  Bureau  disclosed  Monday,  For  549  general  and  farm  magazines,  an 
average  circulation  was  attained  of  209,000,000  copies  per  issue. 
Total  sales  for  the  year  were  325,000,000,000  copies  and  gross  cir¬ 
culation  revenues  were  $418,000,000,  the  bureau  said.  The  average 
family  in  the  United  States  spent  nearly  $11  on  magazines  during  the 
year,  reading  an  average  of  eighty-five  copies  or  seven  copies  a 
month. 


According  to  Drew  Pearson,  Senator  Glen  Taylor,  "radio 
cowboy”,  "who  admits  it  is  a  publicity  stunt,”  will  ride  from  coast- 
to-coast  horse back  this  Summer  making  speeches  enroute.  Mr.  Pearson 
says  Senator  Taylor  is  worried  over  the  threat  of  war  and  wants  to 
dramatize  the  problem  of  peace. 


Arthur  Godfrey,  who  ad-libs,  says  he  once  got  a  letter 
from  a  fan,  who  said:  "I  know  your  program  is  strictly  ad-lib  but 
don't  make  so  much  noise  rattling  them  at  the  microphone.  "  -  From 
Earl  Wilson*  s  book  "Pike's  peek  or  Bust”. 


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"A  Challenge  to  Radio:  "The  Medium",  New  American  Opera, 
Poses  Problem  of  Projecting  a  Character  Who  Is  A  Mute"  -  CBS  Press 
Notice. 

Listen  Sunday  August  10  (3  P.M.  EDT)  and  see  how  it  is 

done* 


Stromberg- Carlson  Company  -  Six  months:  Net  profit, 
0540,000  and  billings  totaled  $15,  668,  966,  R.  H,  Manson,  president, 
reported.  Comparisons  are  not  available.  Reduction  of  inventories 
enaoled  company  to  reduce  bank  debt  by  about  $500,000,  report  added. 


An  innovation  in  television  servicing  has  been  introduced 
at  United  States  Television  Mfg.  Corp.  which  is  to  train  technicians 
in  the  service  division  to  apply  sales  techniques  in  contacts  with 
consumers.  Besides  installing  and  servicing,  technicians  will  inform 
consumers  as  to  what  is  being  done  to  provide  the  best  possible 
television  reception  for  them.  Thomas  L.  Jefferson,  former  Na.vy 
Lt.  Commander  in  the  Electronics  Division  of  the  Bureau  of  Ships 
has  just  been  appointed  Chief  of  the  Installation  and  Maintenance 
Division. 


Commercial  Television  Corporation,  New  York,  rents  tele¬ 
vision  receivers  to  restaurants,  bars  and  other  places.  This  may 
be  done  on  a  more  or  less  permanent  basis  or  serve  as  atryout  for  a 
prospective  purchaser  who  takes  this  way  to  see  how  much  attraction 
television  has  for  customers. 

The  average  cost  of  a  large  screen  television  set  is  in 
the  $2,000  bracket  and  anyone  renting  a  set  may  be  credited  with  a 
portion  of  the  rental  if  he  decides  to  buy. 


A  survey  of  the  comparative  popularity  of  the  frequency 
modulation  stations  in  the  metropolitan  area  has  been  made  by  pulse, 
Inc.,  Jack  Gould  reports  in  the  New  York  Times.  Findings  of  the 
survey  indicate  that  approximately  3  per  cent  of  the  radio  families 
in  Greater  New  York  had  FM  receivers,  which  would  indicate  that 
somewhere  between  50,000  and  80,000  homes  are  equipped  to  receive 
the  high-fidelity  form  of  radio  transmission. 


A  Glen  Rock,  N.J.  couple  celebrated  their  forty-first  wed¬ 
ding  anniversary  last  week  by  winning  $7,440  on  the  American  Broad¬ 
casting  Company's  "Break  the  Bank"  quiz  program.  It  was  said  to  be 
the  greatest  cash  prize  ever  given  on  such  a  program. 

The  winners,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Albert  M.  Fowler,  both  school 
teachers,  answered  without  faltering  the  eight  questions  that  Master 
of  Ceremonies  Bert  Parks  posed  on  people  noted  for  accomplishments 
achieved  after  they  became  75  years  old. 

Asked  what  they  planned  to  do  with  the  money,  Mrs.  Fowler 
replied:  "We  have  a  small  home  that  needs  repairs  and  we're  going 

to  help  this  sick  home  as  well  as  some  sick  people,  " 

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Founded  in  1924 


HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 


Radio  —  Television  —  FM  —  Communications 


2400  California  Street,  N.  W.  Washington  8,  D.  C. 


Robert  D.  Heinl,  Editor 


INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  AUGUST  13,  1947 


QA 


Verbatim.  Broadcasts  May  Make  Disk  Jockeys  Of  Commentators . 1 

Broadcasters  Music  Committee  Reports  progress  With  ASCAP . 3 

General  Mobile  Radiotelephone  Hearing  Postponed  To  Oct.  27 . 3 

FCC  Warns  Stations  Re  Ad  Contracts  Responsibilities . 4 

Weiss  Goes  After  petrillo  Personally  -  Rarely  Done  In  Radio . 5 

RCA  Doesn't  See  Eye  To  Eye  With  Mackay  On  British  Circuits . 6 


"TV  Has  Measured  Up,  Is  Moving  Fbrwardn,  Nicholas,  Farnsworth. ...  8 


New  Radio  Tube  May  Reduce  Cost  Of  Television... . .9 

Listeners  Get  Their  Leons  Mixed  Up........ . ..9 

Up-To-Date  FCC  Radio  Primer  Goes  To  Press............ . .10 

Commander  Koepf  Is  New  Fort  Industry  Detroit  TV  Manager . 10 

Stations  Devote  34$  Of  Time  To  Sustaining  Programs,  NAB  Finds... 11 
Les  Atlass,  CBS  Chicago  Vice-president,  In  Hospital . 11 

NAB  And  RMA  Concentrate  On  "Ra dio-In- Every- Room "  Campaign . 12 

FM  Not  Limited  To  30  Miles;  Can  3e  Extended  For  Rebroadcast, ....  12 

Scissors  And  paste . . . . . 13 

Trade  Notes . . . 15 


\HC. 


No.  1787 


so  w 


4  J  *  »  ♦  ■* 


«  ♦  <  * 


August  13,  1947 


VERBATIM  BROADCASTS  MAY  MAKE  DISK  JOCKEYS  OF  COMMENTATORS 


The  success  of  the  broadcasting  of  the  wire  recorded 
testimony  of  some  of  the  most  exciting  moments  of  the  Hughes- 
Brewster- Roosevelt  Senate  rumpus  by  the  four  network  stations  in 
Washington  -  WRC  (NBC),  WTO?  (CBS),  WMAL  (ABC)  and  WOL  (MBS)  - 
foreshadows  many  commentators  becoming  mere  disk  jockeys.  If  a 
listener  can  actually  hear  a  sharp  exchange  between  witnesses  such 
as  the  clash  between  Howard  Hughes  and  Senator  Brewster  as  to  who 
was  telling  the  truth,  or  the  face  to  face  veracity  encounter  between 
Johnny  Meyer,  the  Hughes  ambassador  of  the  expense  account,  and 
Elliott  Roosevelt,  there  is  little  a  commentator  can  add. 

For  instance,  WTOP-CES  reports  that  it  used  thirteen  miles 
of  tape  during  the  hearings  -  more  than  30  hours  of  recorded  testi¬ 
mony  -  boiled  down  to  four  and  a  half  hours  which  was  broadcast  at 
intervals  during  the  week,  phone  calls  to  WTO?  Jumped  as  much  as 
800  percent  in  one  day  as  are  suit  of  the  programs. 

Thus  the  listener  heard  not  only  what  was  said  but  the 
tone  of  voice  in  which  it  was  said  which  was  about  all  the  commenta¬ 
tor  could  do  who  had  been  present  at  the  hearing.  So,  except  seeing 
the  witnesses  (which  will  come  with  television),  the  listener  was  in 
a  position  to  draw  his  own  conclusions  instead  of  having  to  depend 
upon  a  commentator.  In  which  case  the  commentator  in  many  instances 
will  be  reduced  more  or  less  to  a  disk  jockey  role  of  telling  whose 
voices  the  listener  is  hearing,  etc. 

Also  the  recorded  broadcasts  perform  a  public  service  in 
placing  a  listener  in  intimate  contact  with  a  national  event  such 
as  the  Howard  Hughes  Senate  investigation  and  at  a  convenient  hour 
in  the  evening  when  the  listener  can  give  his  full  time  and  atten¬ 
tion  to  the  subject.  There  is  no  question  after  listening  to  the 
verbatim  recorded  broadcasts  but  that  the  listener  actually  feels 
as  if  he  had  been  there  himself. 

Unque stionably  the  Hughes- Brewster  Senate  War  Investigat¬ 
ing  hearings  have  given  recorded  verbatim  testimony  broadcasts 
their  big  chance. 

There  is  no  doubt  but  what  the  broadcasts  right  from  the 
ringside  have  whetted  the  appetite  of  the  listening  puhLic  for  more 
of  this.  Thus  it  is  believed  the  day  is  not  far  off  when  recorded 
broadcasts  will  form  a  large  part  of  news  commentaries. 

Although  for  years  there  has  been  talk  of  broadcasting 
the  proceedings  of  Congress,  it  was  only  last  March,  after  quite  a 
squabble,  that  NBC  microphones  were  permitted  to  pickup  and  immedr- 
lately  broadcast  testimony  at  a  Congressional  Committee  meeting. 

It  was  a  session  from  the  Caucus  Room  of  the  House  Office  Building 
in  Washington,  where  the  House  Foreign  Affairs  Committee  was  ques¬ 
tioning  Under  Secretary  of  State  Dean  Acheson  on  President  Truman*  s 

-  1  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


8/13/47 


proposed  appropriation  for  aid  to  Greece.  The  pickup  was  reported 
as  of  good  broadcast  quality,  despite  the  fact  that  the  remarks  of 
Under  Secretary  Ache  son,  Representative  Charles  Eaton  (R),  Chair¬ 
man  of  the  House  Foreign  Affairs  Committee  aid  others  were  picked 
up  by  a  microphone  from  a  public  address  speaker.  Previously 
recorded  portions  of  the  Committee  hearings  had  been  broadcast  but 
this  was  the  first  live  pick-up.  For  the  first  time  in  history 
those  who  happened  to  be  listening  heard  a  live  radio  broadcast  of 
the  proceedings  of  a  Congressional  Committee. 

Oddly  enough  though  Congressional  Committees  have  been 
pressed  time  and  again  to  allow  recorded  broadcasts  and  Senators 
and  Representatives  have  considered  formal  resolutions  which  would 
permit  this  to  be  done,  the  initial  permission  came  with  no  advance 
publicity  and  simply  by  verbal  authorization.  It  is  believed  by 
many  that  Congress  may  yield  sooner  or  later  just  as  easily  as  that 
and  the  time  is  near  at  hand  when  broadcasts  of  highlights  of  gener¬ 
al  sessions  of  Congress  will  be  commonplace. 

Senator  Arthur  K.  Vandenberg  (r),  of  Michigan,  was  a 
pioneer  in  using  a  live  recorded  broadcast  when  he  dubbed  the  voice 
of  president  Roosevelt  into  a  speech  he  was  making  in  the  campaign 
of  1936.  He  used  some  1932  recordings  of  president  Roosevelt* s  pre¬ 
campaign  promises  and  then  asked  why  Mr.  Roosevelt  had  not  made  them 
good.  Senator  Vandenberg  was  delivering  a  country-wide  broadcast  and 
the  networks  in  their  excitement  upon  learning  the  nature  of  the  un¬ 
rehearsed  program,  immediately  cut  the  Senator  off.  The  ground  for 
this  action  was  theoretically  that  the  chains  allowed  no  recordings 
to  be  broadcast.  The  real  reason,  however,  was  the  panic  over  the 
political  dynamite  such  a  broadcast  might  contain.  The  nets  quickly 
woke  up  to  the  fact  that  cutting  off  as  big  a  man  as  Vandenberg 
might  kick  up  as  big  a  rumpus  as  allowing  him  to  be  heard  and  some 
of  the  chains  resumed.  WGN  was  said  to  have  been  the  only  station 
that  broadcast  the  entire  address. 

The  funny  part  of  it  wae  though  it  was  announced  at  the 
beginning  that  President  Roosevelt* s  voice  was  a  transcription  and 
that  Senator  Vandenberg  was  speaking  in  person,  some  Individuals 
got  the  impression  that  it  was  a  joint  debate  between  Senator 
Vandenberg  and  President  Roosevelt  with,  of  course,  the  latter  get¬ 
ting  much  the  worst  of  it. 

Oddly  enough  the  Democrats  used  Roosevelt's  voice  and 
somewhat  the  same  technique  in  the  campaign  of  1946.  One  of  the 
Democratic  National  Committee  recordings  dealt  with  the  meat  short¬ 
age.  professional  actors,  hired  in  New  York,  discussed  the  matter. 
One  of  them  said,  in  effect,  "Here's  what  President  Roosevelt  had 
to  say  about  it."  Roosevelt's  voice,  taken  from  an  earlier  record¬ 
ing,  then  came  in,  explaining  the  necessity  for  fighting  inflation. 
Then  president  Truman's  voice  was  brought  in  to  explain  the  latest 
action  in  the  meat  controversy. 


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8/13/ 47 


Another  platter  dealt  with  war  veterans.  A  third  dram¬ 
atization,  built  around  "a  man  who  remembers”,  looked  backward  to 
the  Harding,  Coolidge  and  Hoover  administrations.  In  both,  the 
voices  of  Roosevelt  and  Truman  were  dubbed  in. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

BROADCASTERS  MUSIC  COMMITTEE  REPORTS  PROGRESS  WITH  ASCAP 

Progress  in  its  discussions  with  ASCAP  concerning  renewal 
of  broadcasting  industry  licenses  was  reported  by  the  National 
Association  of  Broadcasters'  Music  Advisory  Committee  last  week, 
after  a  meeting  in  New  York  City  with  ASCAP,  President  Deems  Taylor 
and  a  special  committee  appointed  by  the  music  licensing  organiza¬ 
tion's  Board  of  Directors. 

Theodore  Streibert,  WOR,  Chairman  of  the  NAB  Committee, 
said  after  the  meeting  that  tentative  plans  had  been  made  to  meet 
again  in  about  one  month. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

GENERAL  MOBILE  RADIOTELEPHONE  HEARING  POSTPONED  TO  OCT.  27 

The  Federal  Communications  Commission  has  postponed  the 
General  Mobile  hearing  now  set  for  September  8th  to  October  27th, 
and  extended  date  for  filing  appearances  and  written  statements  to 
October  1st. 

This  Order  relieves  the  licensees  of  taxicab  radio  dis¬ 
patching  systems  and  other  general  mobile  experimental  radiotele¬ 
phone  systems  of  the  requirement  that  they  apply  for  renewal  of 
their  experimental  licenses  this  year  as  they  would  otherwise  be 
required  to  do  prior  to  September  1st. 

The  Commission,  however,  requests  that  the  experimental 
reports  which  normally  acoompany  each  application  for  renewal  of 
experimental  license  be  subnitted  prior  to  September  1,  1947,  or,  in 
lieu  thereof,  that  F.  C.  C.  Questionnaire  7560  be  filled  out  and  re¬ 
turned  to  the  Commission  by  the  same  date. 

It  is  contemplated  that  the  October  27th  hearing  will 
result  in  the  establishment  of  a  regular  service  for  which  many 
licensees  of  experimental  general  mobile  systems  will  be  eligible. 

In  this  event  it  will  be  necessary  for  eligible  experimental  licen¬ 
sees  to  apply  for  authority  to  operate  in  such  a  service,  and  the 
extension  will  serve  to  avoid  a  duplication  of  work  involved  in  the 
submission  and  processing  of  applications  for  renewals  as  well  as 
new  licenses. 


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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


8/13/47 


FCC  WARNS  STATIONS  RE  AD  CONTRACTS  RESPONSIBILITIES 


The  Federal  Communications  Commission  recently  received 
information  concerning  certain  contracts  that  were  entered  into  be¬ 
tween  several  licensees  and  permittees  of  radio  broadcast  stations 
under  which  broadcast  time  was  sold  directly  to  an  advertising 
agency;  the  latter  in  turn  sold  this  broadcast  time  to  participating 
sponsors,  arranged  the  programs  for  certain  periods,  selected  the 
talent  when  used,  and,  in  some  Instances,  used  its  own  studios  for 
the  production  of  programs  which  were  carried  by  remote  control  to 
the  transmitters  of  the  broadcast  stations  in  question;  and  in  at 
least  one  case  the  contract  in  terms  provided  that  the  advertising 
agency  should  take  over  the  commercial  management  of  the  station. 

Upon  investigation,  it  appeared  that  none  of  the  above-mentioned 
contracts  had  been  filed  with  the  Commission,  nor  had  the  stations 
involved  in  such  contractual  arrangements  requested  the  Commission's 
consent  therefor. 

In  connection  with  such  contracts,  or  similar  arrangements, 
whether  of  a  formal  or  informal  nature,  the  attention  of  all  station 
licensees,  permittees,  and  applicants  is  invited  to  Section  310(b) 
of  the  Communications  Act  of  1934,  as  amended,  which  prohibits  the 
voluntary  or  involuntary  transfer  of  a  license  or  of  "the  frequencies 
authorized  to  be  used  by  the  licensee,  and  the  rights  therein  grant¬ 
ed",  or  the  transfer  of  control  of  alicensee  corporation,  unless  the 
Commission  decides,  on  the  basis  of  full  information,  that  the  trans¬ 
fer  is  in  the  public  interest  and  so  signifies  in  writing. 

The  Commission,  in  accordance  with  the  foregoing  provi¬ 
sions  of  the  Act,  has  repeatedly  emphasized  that  the  licensee  is  res¬ 
ponsible  for  the  management  and  operation  of  the  station  in  the  pub¬ 
lic  interest,  and  has  required  that  this  responsibility  shall  not  be 
improperly  delegated,  whether  by  contract  or  otherwise,  to  another. 
Thus,  in  Bellingham  “roadcasting  Company  case,  it  was  pointed  out 
that  the  licensee  of  a  radio  broadcast  station  must  be  neces¬ 

sarily  held  responsible  for  all  program  service  and  may  not  delegate 
his  ultimate  responsibility  for  such  to  others. "  In  numerous  sub¬ 
sequent  cases,  the  Commission  has  re-emephasized  this  principle. 

The  requirement,  therefore,  that  the  station  licensee  shall 
exercise  full  and  final  responsibility  for  the  operation  of  his 
broadcast  station,  and  that  he  shall  not  divest  himself,  directly  or 
Indirectly,  of  the  substantial  measure  of  control  necessary  to  ful¬ 
fill  it,  is  a  basic  feature  of  the  Communications  Act,  and,  as  a 
matter  of  administrative  practice,  the  Commission  has  constantly 
adhered  to  such  requirement.  Arrangements  of  the  nature  described 
above  will,  therefore,  be  carefully  scrutinized  by  the  Commission  to 
determine  whether  they  involve  surrender  of  the  licensee's  respons¬ 
ibilities. 


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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


8/13/47 


WEISS  GOES  AFTER  PETRILLO  PERSONALLY  -  RARELY  DONE  IN  RADIO 


You  can  count  the  people  in  the  radio  industry  on  your 
left  hand  who  have  had  the  courage  to  publicly  tell  Janes  C.  Petrillo, 
President  of  the  American  Federation  of  Musicians,  where  they  think 
he  should  get  off.  One  of  these  was  Ralph  Atlass,  who  called  the 
turn  on  the  little  music  dictator  in  Chicago,  and  another  Stanley 
Hubbard  of  KST?  in  Minneapolis. 

A  third  last  week  was  Lewis  Allen  Weiss  of  Los  Angeles, 
newly  elected  Chairman  of  the  Mutual  Broadcasting  System  and  the 
first  national  network  head  to  be  chosen  from  the  Pacific  Coast. 

Mr.  Weiss,  who  is  a  veteran  broadcaster,  president  and  General 
Manager  of  Mutual' 6  affiliated  Don  Lee  network  of  43  Pacific  coast 
stations,  told  the  House  Labor  subcommittee  now  continuing  the 
Washington  Congressional  investigation  by  probing  into  the  Hollywood 
music  situation,  that  the  AFM  "conducts  itself  differently  from  any 
other  union  with  which  we  have  to  deal  because  of  the  domination  of 
one  man  -  James  C.  Petrillo,  union  president.  "  Mr.  Weiss  said  the 
AM  under  Petrillo  was  a  "despotic"  union  which  had  engaged  in  a 
"racket"  end  among  other  activities  had  effectively  stymied  the 
growth  of  EM  and  television. 

Mr.  Weiss  declared  the  music  union  had  repeatedly  and 
"ruthlessly"  broken  its  contracts.  That,  he  said,  came  in  suddenly 
cutting  off  the  network  broadcasts  of  dance  bands  in  amusement 
places  simply  because  in  some  individual  locality  the  union  had  a 
dispute  with  the  locaL  network  station.  This  was  a  device,  Mr.  Weiss 
said,  to  make  the  network  impose  a  "secondary  boycott"  on  the  member 
station  until  it  acceded  to  union  demai  ds. 

The  main  issue  between  the  union  and  the  network  at  the 
moment,  he  said,  was  Mr.  Petrillo' s  insistence  on  imposing  a  large 
surcharge  when  the  Western  network,  because  of  the  four- hour  time 
differential  with  the  East,  could  not  broadcast  a  program  at  the  same 
hour  as  Eastern  stations  and  recorded  it  for  later  transmissions. 

In  the  case  of  one  program  alone,  he  said,  this  surcharge 
amounted  to  $12,000,  although  no  additional  services  were  rendered, 
there  was  no  question  of  the  program’s  being  broadcast  twice  in  the 
same  area,  and  the  musicians  had  already  been  paid  on  the  basis  of 
full  coverage  of  the  country. 

Mr.  Weiss  assailed  the  union's  ruling  that  a  metropolitan 
station  should  expend  an  amount  equal  to  five  and  one-half  per  cent 
of  its  net  income  on  musicians;  the  "racket"  by  which  the  union  de¬ 
manded  the  employment  of  "stand-by"  musicians  when  non-union  members 
played  (which  union  officials  previously  testified  was  being  abol¬ 
ished)  and  the  shifting  of  authority  "without  notice"  from  the  hands 
of  union  locals  to  the  hands  of  Mr.  Petrillo. 

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8/13/47 


RCA  DOESN’T  SEE  EYE  TO  EYE  WITH  MACKAY  ON  BRITISH  CIRCUITS 


The  Radio  Corporation  of  America  has  filed  with  the 
Federal  Communications  Commission  its  response  to  the  Exceptions 
of  the  Mack ay  Radio  and  Telegraph  Company  to  the  proposed  report  of 
the  Commission  in  the  case  which  gave  RCA  six  out  of  eleven  circuits 
to  British  Qnpire  points,  as  against  only  one  to  Mackay  (The  July 
23rd  issue  of  the  Heinl  News  Service  carried  a  story  on  the  Mackay 
Exceptions. ) 

The  oral  argument  in  this  case,  originally  set  for  August 
8th  and  then  postponed  to  September  24th  has  been  postponed  another 
week  until  October  1st.  It  is  one  of  the  most  important  non-broad¬ 
cast  cases  ever  to  come  before  the  Commission,  and  if  the  proposed 
report  of  the  Commission  is  adopted  in  its  present  form  many 
precedents  will  have  been  established. 

The  RCA  reply,  filed  by  its  attorneys  Glen  McDaniel, 

John  W.  Nields,  and  Howard  R.  Hawkins,  is  in  the  form  of  a  56  page 
printed  document  which  is  easy  to  read  because  in  parallel  columns 
on  each  page  are  the  pertinent  paragraphs  of  the  Commission’s  pro¬ 
posed  report,  Mackay 's  exceptions,  and  RCA's  reply  to  each  exception. 

Where  Mackay  takes  exception  to  the  Commission’s  award 
to  RCA  because  it  ”operates  more  direct  circuits,  handles  more  tele¬ 
phone  traffic,  obtains  larger  revenues  and  realizes  better  net  oper¬ 
ating  results  than  any  other  United  States  radiotelegraph  carrier”, 
RCA  says  ”The  truth  of  the  facts  stated  by  the  Commission  is  not 
challenged  by  Mackay.  Mackay  does  not  deny  that  RCA  realizes  better 
net  operating  results  than  any  other  United  States  radiotelegraph 
carrier.  Since  the  public  interest  consists  of  the  best  possible 
service  at  the  lowest  possible  cost,  the  realization  of  better  net 
operating  results  bears  directly  upon  the  public  interest.  Better 
net  operating  results  are  persuasive  evidence  that  the  company  real¬ 
izing  them  is  able  to  provide  more  efficient  service. ” 

In  regard  to  another  exception  noted  by  Mackay,  RCA  says 
”Mackay  is  merely  taking  exception  to  its  own  proposed  finding.  It 
would  ask  the  Commission  to  adopt  a  finding  with  respect  to  one  part 
of  the  case  and  insist  that  it  cannot  be  adopted  for  another  part  of 
the  case.  n 


With  respect  to  Mackay ’ s  exception  covering  antennas,  RCA 
says,  ”The  superior  performance  characteristics  of  the  RCA  antennas 
are  set  forth  in  the  record.  The  performance  characteristics  of 
the  Mackay  antennas  are  not.  Mackay  cannot  expect  to  obtain  a  favor¬ 
able  finding,  or  escape  an  unfavorable  finding,  by  default.  n 

Mackay's  claim  that  the  Commission  should  give  it  a  larger 
share  of  the  circuits  to  foster  competition  is  answered  by  RCA  as 
follows : 


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"Competitive  considerations  alone  would  not  lead  to  the 
conclusion  that  additional  circuit  licenses  should  be  granted  to 
Mackay  in  this  proceeding,  in  view  of  the  following  factors: 

"(1)  Mackay  is  part  of  American  Cable  and  Radio  Corpora¬ 
tion  which  is  the  1 largest  American  owned  international  telegraph 
company*.  AC&R  in  turn  is  a  part  of  the  world-wide  IT&T  system. 

The  operating  entities  of  AC&R  for  many  years  have  had  more  traffic 
$nd  more  revenue  than  RCA.  For  the  eight  and  a  half  years  for  which 
comparisons  were  included  in  the  record,  1936  to  the  middle  of  1943, 
AC&R  had  65.7  per  cent  and  RCA  had  34.3  per  cent  of  the  revenues  of 
the  two  companies  from  combined  inbound  and  outbound  traffic.  The 
financial  resources  of  the  group  are  used  for  the  benefit  of  Mackay. 

"(2)  In  the  past  nine  years  the  Commission  has  doubled 
the  number  of  circuit  licenses  of  Mackay,  whereas  RCA's  circuit  li¬ 
censes  have  increased  only  50  per  cent.  Between  1936  and  1943 
Mackay’s  traffic  increased  560  per  cent  in  comparison  to  an  increase 
of  186  per  cent  of  RCA.  RCA* s  percentage  of  total  telegraph  traffic 
declined  from  20.6  per  cent  in  1936  to  19.3  per  cent  in  1943,  while 
Mackay*  s  increased  from  2.7  per  cent  to  6,8  per  cent,  or  two  and  a 
half  times  its  1936  participation. 

"(3)  There  is  no  evidence  that  a  grant  of  additional  cir¬ 
cuits  to  Mackay  for  reasons  related  to  competitive  considerations 
will  improve  rapid  communications  with  countries  of  the  world.  As 
the  Commission  has  heretofore  noted,  the  Commission’s  duty  is  to 
determine  the  public  interest,  convenience,  or  necessity  from  the 
view-point  of  the  country  as  a  whole,  uncontrolled  by  the  private 
interest  of  particular  carriers.  11 

In  reply  to  another  of  Mackay *s  exceptions,  RCA  says  "it 
is  idle  to  talk  of  an  RCA  ’monopoly*  when  AC&R  for  years  has  had 
more  traffic  and  more  revenues  than  RCA,  and  when  international  tele¬ 
graph  faces  increasingly  serious  competition  from  air  mail  and 
radiotelephone.  " 

With  regard  to  Mackay  objecting  to  the  Commission  giving 
RCA  credit  for  greater  speed  in  modernization,  RCA  says: 

"By  this  Exception,  Mackay  clearly  admits  that  RCA  has 
made  more  extensive  progress  than  has  Mackay  in  the  realization  of 
the  plans  of  the  respective  carriers  for  the  improvement  of  their 
service.  Mackay  does  not  dispute  the  technical  and  economical  sound¬ 
ness  of  RCA* s  modernization  plan  and  did  not  in  the  course  of  the 
hearings.  On  the  contrary,  Mackey  repeatedly  protested  that  it  had 
a  similar  program,  thus  admitting  the  technical  and  economical 
soundness  of  such  a  program.  The  statement  that  RCA  plunged  head¬ 
long  into  its  program  and  pursue dit  with  accelerated  speed  is  an 
admission  that  RCA  has  accomplished  what  Mackay  has  been  unable  to 
accomplish.  ** 

To  Mackay* s  exception  that  the  situation  has  changed  since 
the  hearing  began,  more  than  a  year  ago,  RCA  says  "To  some  extent, 
greater  or  lesser,  the  record.s  of  all  proceedings  of  this  character 
before  administrative  tribunals  are  not  ’current*  at  the  time 

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8/13/47 


decision  is  rendered.  If  the  passage  of  time  were  a  ground  for  re¬ 
opening  the  record  of  such  proceedings,  a  final  decision  would  never 
be  reached.  " 

Finally,  RCA  with  regard  to  Mackay’ s  entire  list  of  ex¬ 
ceptions,  remakrs,  "The  premise  of  the  Mackay  Exceptions,  that  Mackay 
and  RCA  are  Equally  qualified  carriers’  is  the  premise  Mackay  fail¬ 
ed  to  establish  in  these  proceedings, " 

XXXXXXXXXX 

"TV  HAS  MEASURED  UP,  IS  MOVING-  FORWARD”,  NICHOLAS,  FARNSWORTH 

"While  drawing  its  first  breath,  television  has  been 
measured  against  radio,  the  stage  and  the  motion  picture.  In  the 
face  of  this,  television  has  won  hearty  approval.  It  has  measured 
up.  It  has  shown  itself  fully  ready  for  the  American  home.  It 
has  proved  its  advertising, 

"Television  is  moving  forward,  inspired  by  public  con¬ 
fidence.  " 


Thus  spoke  E.  A,  Nichols,  President  of  the  Farnsworth 
Television  and  Radio  Corporation  addressing  a  national  gathering 
of  the  company’s  distributors  in  Chicago, 

"It  is  an  obvious  statement  that  the  potential  market 
for  television  receivers  is  huge.  The  sale  of  five  million  sets  is 
likely  in  the  next  five  years.  The  volume,  of  course,  will  depend 
to  considerable  extent  on  retail  prices”,  Mr.  Nicholas  continued. 

"It  is  only  competitive  horse-sense  that  every  manufactur¬ 
er  will  keep  his  television  products  at  the  lowest  possible  price 
levels.  And  these  price  levels  will  be  well  within  the  means  of  a 
large  percentage  of  the  American  public. 

"Eleven  television  stations  are  on  the  air  with  regular 
programs  in  eight  cities.  These  cities  are:  New  York,  Washington, 
Philadelphia,  Schenectady,  Chicago,  Detroit,  St.  Louis  and  Los 
Angeles.  Represented  here  is  a  total  population  of  25  millions, 

"Fifty-five  additional  station  construction  permits  have 
been  granted  by  the  FCC.  Fifteen  of  these  stations  expect  to  be 
operating  by  the  end  of  this  year.  Fifty-five  permits,  of  course, 
do  not  mean  fifty-five  different  cities.  Some  of  the  larger  cities 
now  have,  and  will  have,  more  than  one  or  two  stations. 

"But  this  number  does  include  37  cities,  in  almost  all 
parts  of  the  country,  not  now  enjoying  television  service.  Chicago, 
for  example,  is  destined  to  become  a  capital  of  television.  Station 
WSK3  has  been  pioneering  here  since  before  the  war.  The  Chicago 
Tribune  is  now  erecting  a  telecasting  station.  The  National  Broadr* 
casting  Company  and  the  American  Broadcasting  Company  have  received 
permits  to  build  stations  in  Chicago.*  *  * 


-  8  - 


He 1 nl  Radio  News  Service 


8/13/47 


"Stations  in  all  the  cities  now  pending  should  be  operat¬ 
ing  by  the  end  of  1948.  The  areas  they  will  serve  Include  more  than 
40  per  cent  of  the  nation’s  population. 

"Television  service  need  not  be  limited  to  the  large 
cities.  Smaller  communities  will  have  television  too.  Like  radio, 
which  in  many  ways  has  blazed  a  path  for  television,  the  new  service 
can  be  made  economically  feasible  in  the  smaller  market  areas.  The 
networking  of  television  programs  will  be  helpful.  That  networking 
already  is  under  way. 

"About  6,500  miles  of  coaxial  cable  are  to  be  operating 
this  year.  Another  means  of  linking  stations  has  begun  with  the 
use  of  microwave  radio  relay  systems.  A  system  of  this  kind  is  now 
in  operation  on  the  East  Coast.  It  may  well  be  the  forerunner  of 
a  new  kind  of  network  facility,  which  will  carry  national  programs 
to  remote  smaller  stations  as  well  as  the  larger  ones.  Very  pos¬ 
sibly,  the  ultimate  will  be  a  combination  service  by  coaxial  cable 
and  radio  relay.  " 

XXXXXXXXXX 

NEW  RADIO  TUBE  MAY  REDUCE  COST  OF  TELEVISION 

A  "traveling  wave"  radio  tube  twice  as  powerful  as  any 
existing  model  was  disclosed  by  Dr.  Lester  M.  Field,  Stanford  Univ¬ 
ersity,  Palo  Alto,  Calif.,  electrical  engineering  researcher. 

The  foot-long  tube  will  make  it  possible  to  amplify  simul¬ 
taneously  250,000  telephone  conversations,  300  black  and  white  tele¬ 
vision  broadcasts  or  100  color  telecasts. 

Fields  said  the  radical  tube  appears  to  supply  the  answer 
to  one  of  television’s  major  problems.  It  doubles  the  ability  of 
earlier  models  to  cover  a  wide  range  of  frequencies  and  handle  a  huge 
volume  of  radio  traffic. 


XXXXXXXXXX 
LISTENERS  GET  THEIR  LEONS  MIXED  UP 

An  amusing  incident  in  connection  with  Leon  Pearson  "pinch- 
hitting"  for  his  brother  Drew  Pearson  over  ABC  each  Sunday  night  is 
that  some  of  his  fan  mail  is  going  to  Leon  Henderson.  Mr.  Henderson’s 
secretary  said  letters  had  been  receiving  thanking  Henderson  for  his 
Sunday  evening  radio  show.  Since  he  has  no  such  program,  they  were 
puzzled  to  know  the  reason  for  the  letters.  Apparently  the  explana¬ 
tion  lies  in  the  fact  that  the  names  are  so  nearly  alike. 

Thus,  however,  between  Drew  Pearson  on  the  one  hand  and 
Leon  Henderson  on  the  other,  Leon  Pearson,  who  is  the  head  of  the 
International  News  Service  in  Paris  and  a  radio  commentator  in  his 
own  right,  seems  to  have  lost  his  identity  completely. 

XXXXXXXXXXXX 

-  9  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


8/13/47 


UP-TO-DATE  FCC  RADIO  PRIMER  GOES  TO  PRESS 


Copy  for  the  latest  edition  of  what  Is  sure  to  be  one  of 
the  Federal  Communications  Commission’s  best  sellers  -  "Radio  -  A 
Public  primer”  -  has  just  been  sent  to  the  Government  Printing 
Office. 


The  revised  edition  does  not  carry  the  name  of  the  author 
but  of  course,  as  always,  it  is  George  0.  Gillingham,  head  of  the 
Press  Section  of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission,  who  in  his 
anonymity  has  probably  been  read  by  more  radio  listeners  than  any¬ 
body  on  earth. 

"Radio  -  A  Public  Primer"  is  primarily  to  answer  questions 
of  the  lay  man.  Broadcasters  also  will  find  this  revised  edition 
helpful  as  they  are  the  target  for  about  the  same  queries  as  the 
Communications  Commission. 

The  following  FCC  publications  may  be  obtained  from  the 
Superintendent  of  Documents,  Government  Printing  Office,  Washington 
25,  D.  C. ,  at  the  prices  indicated: 


Title  price 

"An  ABC  of  the  FCC” . '  5$zT 

Communications  Act  of  1934,  with  amendments . 15 

Annual  Report  of  the  FCC  for  fiscal  1946 .  20 

Report,  "public  Service  responsibility  of  Broadcast 

Licensees”  (Blue  Book)  .  25 

Statistics  of  the  Communications  Industry  for  1944 .  40 

Part  I  of  the  Commission* s  Rules  and  Regulation  Relating 

to  Organization  and  Practice  and  Procedure . 30 


Printed  copies  of  "Radio  -  A  Public  Primer”  will  be  avail¬ 
able  at  the  GPO  around  October  1  and  probably  for  approximately  10/ 
a  copy. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

COMMANDER  KOEPF  IS  NEW  FORT  INDUSTRY  DETROIT  TV  MANAGER 

Commander  John  Koepf,  formerly  in  charge  of  the  Washington 
Office  of  The  Fort  Industry  Company,  has  been  transferred  to  their 
Detroit  headquarters  as  Television  Manager.  Commander  Koepf  before 
entering  the  Navy  was  associated  with  Proctor  and  Gamble  and  Station 
WLW  in  Cincinnati. 

Fort  Industry  is  now  constructing  a  television  station  in 
Detroit,  in  connection  with  Fort  Industry *s  recently  acquired  WJBK, 
Detroit,  the  home  of  Commander  George  3.  Storer,  President  of  the 
company.  The  Detroit  television  station  will  have  a  500  foot  antenna 
tower  which  is  expected  to  become  a  landmark  in  that  part  of  the 
city. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


-  10  - 


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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


8/13/47 


STATIONS  DEVOTE  34^  OF  TIME  TO  SUSTAINING  PROGRAMS,  NAB  FINDS 


Member  stations  of  the  National  Association  of  Broadcast¬ 
ers  spend  one- third  of  their  time  on  the  air  presenting  "sustaining” 
programs,  according  to  an  extensive  analysis  Just  completed  by  the 
NAB  Research  Department. 

These  programs,  which  are  not  supported  directly  by  adver¬ 
tisers,  constitute  34$  of  the  program  fare  broadcast  by  NAB  members. 
The  remaining  time  is  devoted  to  sponsored  programs. 

For  purposes  of  this  survey,  a  "sustaining  program"  was 
defined  as:  "Any  uninterrupted  segment  of  the  station's  time  which  is 
five  minutes  or  more  in  length  and  from  which  the  station  derives  no 
income,  " 


This  study  was  the  first  of  a  series  of  such  surveys  which 
will  be  made  by  the  NAB.  It  was  based  on  station  logs  for  the  week 
of  November  21-27,  1946.  Already  the  NAB  Research  Department  has 
begun  a  similar  analysis  of  logs  for  a  week  in  February  of  1947.  It 
is  expected  that  these  studies  will  be  continued  regularly  on  a  semi¬ 
annual  schedule. 

A  scientifically  selected  sample  of  station  program  records 
was  used  as  the  basis  for  the  study  Just  completed.  This  sample  was 
limited  to  commercial  AM  stations  in  continental  United  States  which 
were  actually  on  the  air  aid  were  NAB  members  on  November  1,  1946, 

The  stations  had  no  advance  knowledge  that  their  records  would  be 
requested. 

"The  selection  of  the  sample",  NA3  Research  Director  Kenn¬ 
eth  H.  Baker  pointed  out,  "was  by  a  randomized  procedure  so  that  the 
results  would  be  projectable  to  the  membership.  Although  the  actual 
selection  of  the  stations  was  determined  by  the  use  of  tables  of 
random  numbers,  definite  controls  were  established  to  produce  repre¬ 
sentativeness  in  the  following  variables:  station  size,  city  size, 
geographic  distribution,  network  affiliation,  and  part-time — full¬ 
time  operation.  Cf  this  number,  G5  ret 

"One-hundred  stations  were  selected  at  random  according 
to  the  above  controls.  Of  this  number,  35  returned  usable  data.  " 

XXXXXXXXXXX 

LES  ATLASS,  CBS  CHICAGO  VICE-PRESIDENT,  IN  HOSPITAL 

H.  Leslie  Atlass,  a  Vice-President  of  the  Columbia  Broad¬ 
casting  System  and  founder  of  Chicago  Radio  Station  W3BM,  collapsed 
of  a  heart  attack  Monday  night  on  his  yacht  in  Lake  Michigan  and  was 
revived  by  an  inhalator  rushed  by  speedboat,  according  to  an  Associ¬ 
ated  Press  dispatch.  He  was  removed  to  a  hospital  where  attendants 
said  his  condition  was  fair. 

XXXXXXXX 


-  11  - 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/13/47 


NA3  AND  RMA  CONCENTRATE  ON  ” RADI  O-IN-E VERM-ROOM ”  CAMPAIGN 


In  an  exchaige  of  letters  with  RMA  President  Max  F.  Balcora, 
NAB  President  Justin  Miller  pledged  the  cooperation  of  broadcasters 
in  the  RMA  year-round  n Radio- in- Every  Room”  campaign  as  well  as  in 
the  Joint  observance  of  National  Radio  Week  October  26-November  1. 

At*  Radio-in- Every-Room *  and  * A-Radio-for-Every-purpose  * 
eventually  means  more  listening  hours  by  more  individuals  to  our  pro¬ 
gram  offerings  and,  of  course,  those  are  goals  toward  which  the  mem¬ 
bers  of  our  industry  constantly  strive”,  Mr.  Miller  said. 

Referring  to  National  Radio  Week,  the  NA3  president  wrote: 

”1  do  want  to  assure  you  that  no  effort  will  be  spared  by  NA3  to 
make  Radio  Week  in  1947  a  happy  and  successful  undertaking  for  both 
of  our  industries”. 

RMA  President  Balcom,  in  his  letter  to  Mr.  Miller,  pointed 
out  that  the  RMA  ” Radio-in-Eve ry- Room ”  campaign  will  benefit  broad¬ 
casters  as  well  as  radio  manufacturers. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

FM  NOT  LIMITED  TO  30  MILES;  CAN  BE  EXTENDED  FOR  RE  BROADCAST 

A  demonstration  of  network  broadcasting  without  the  use 
of  long  distance  telephone  wire  circuits,  was  given  last  week  before 
the  delegates  representing  77  nations  attending  the  International 
Telecommunications  Conference  through  FM  programs  originating  at 
Alpine,  N.  J. ,  received  by  Station  W0A3-FM  in  Atlantic  City,  a  dis¬ 
tance  of  116  miles,  and  rebroadcast  to  the  delegates  in  their  hotel 
a  few  miles  awsy  . 

It  was  Sai  d  the  demonstration,  originating  in  Dr.  E.  K. 
Armstrong* s  FM  station  W2XEA-W2XMN  at  Alpine,  proved  that  FM  broad¬ 
casting  in  the  100-megacycle  range  is  not  limited  to  a  30  mile 
radius,  but  can  be  extended  over  much  greater  distances  for  rebroad¬ 
cast  purposes;  in  other  words,  it  disproves  the  impression  held  by 
many  that  FM  broadcasts  cannot  be  sent  beyond  the  ”line  of  sight” 
without  the  use  of  long  telephone  wire  circuits. 

The  program  demonstrating  this  technique  used  musical  sel¬ 
ections  which  particularly  emphasized  high  fidelity  and  noise  reduc¬ 
tion  properties.  It  was  picked  up  by  a  special  receiver  at  a  point 
near  Atlantic  City,  carried  by  a  short  high-fidelity  wire  circuit  to 
station  W3A~»-FM  and  rebroadcast  by  a  3-kilowatt  transmitter  employ¬ 
ing  the  frequematic  modulator  and  square  loop  antenna  of  the  Feder¬ 
al  Telephone  and  Radio  Corporation,  Clifton,  N.J. ,  affiliate  of 
International  Telephone  and  Telegraph  Corporation. 

Many  of  the  delegates  showed  interest  in  the  demonstration 
as  a  means  of  providing  re broadcasting  without  the  attendant  expense 
of  long  telephone  lines  -  that  is,  one  major  high  power  station  could 
be  utilized  for  supplying  programs  to  any  number  of  smaller  satellite 
stations  suitably  equipped  with  elevated  antennas&sensitive  receivers. 

Dr.  Arastrong,  a  well  known  radio  inventor  who  has  contri¬ 
buted  much  to  radio  art  and  who  developed  the  FM  system  used  in  the 
demonstration,  also  addressed  the  delegates  of  ITC. 

XXXXXXXX  -12- 


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Cowles  Says  Must  Have  greater  Production  To  Avoid  World  War  III 

(  "Washington  Post  **) 

A  blunt  statement  by  Representative  Charles  A.  Eaton, 
Chairman  of  the  House  Foreign  Affairs  Committee,  adds  fuel  to  the 
flames.  "Let^  Have  a  Showdown  With  Russia”,  in  the  American  - 
and  Eaton  doesn't  mean  maybe.  Russia  has  shown  her  imperialistic 
intentions,  Eaton  states,  and  must  be  stopped.  "I  think  we  can  still 
block  Russia  with  psychology",  he  says.  "If  we  don't,  we  must  de¬ 
feat  her  by  force  of  arms. "  *  *  *  *  * 

This  same  policy  is  advocated  in  another  blast  at  the 
Russians  by  Gardner  Cowles,  editor  of  Look  in  an  article  in  the  cur¬ 
rent  issue  of  that  magazine,  called  "Stalin  Is  Blocking  Willkie's 
One  World".  Cowles,  who  is  President  of  the  Cowles  Broadcasting  Co. 
and  who  recently  returned  from  a  trip  around  the  world  in  augurating 
Pan  American* s  World  Airway  Service,  also  accompanied  Wendell  Willkie 
on  his  fanous  wartime  global  trip.  He  thinks  only  substantial  and 
immediate  aid  will  save  the  democracies  in  Europe.  Their  productive 
capacity  must  be  restored,  whether  Russia  likes  it  or  not. 

This  does  not  mean  the  destruction  of  Willkie* s  "one  world" 
idea.  Conditions  for  this  were  destroyed  already  by  the  increasingly 
despotic  Russian  regime,  Cowles  says.  But  if  Europe  is  to  be  helped, 
it  must  be  with  goods  produced  here,  not  only  with  dollars.  We  must 
have  greater  production  than  ever  in  order  to  avoid  World  War  III, 
even  if  this  conflicts  with  such  goals  as  shorter  working  hours  and 
a  higher  standard  of  living,  he  declares. 


Another  Huckster 
(  "New  York”  Time  s'"") 

The  hucksters  -  and  their  kind  -  are  still  riding.  Their 
gaudy  station  wagons,  half-timbered  like  Elizabethan  houses  (what 
you  might  call  the  St rat ford-up on- Detroit- River  school  of  automobile 
design),  continue  to  tool  in,  loaded  with  characters  for  new  novels 
about  the  entertainment  industry  and  allied  arts.  The  people  them¬ 
selves  don't  look  so  new  any  more.  And  the  neon-lit  pandemonium  of 
their  lives  has  begun  to  seem  somewhat  routine.  But  they  still  pro¬ 
vide  a  fair  amount  of  satiric  entertainment. 

The  latest  venture  of  this  kind  is  Richard  Mealand's  "Let 
Me  Do  the  Talking",  which  his  publishers  blandly  call  "a  witty, 
behind-the-scenes  novel  about  a  literary  agent. "  Well,  it  is  that, 
we  agree,  though  the  -wit  sometimes  gets  pretty  desperate.  It  is 
also  more  than  that,  in  that  it  inevitably  gives  encores  to  the  big- 
time  picture  executive,  the  choleric  radio  manager,  the  widely  gift¬ 
ed  writer,  the  murderous  vendettas  between  New  York  and  Hollywood 
agents,  and  the  familiar  night-club  and  barroom  scenes. 


13  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


8/13/47 


Radio  Folk  Labor  Till  Dawn  On  Lincoln  Papers 

( Sonia  Stein  in  H Washington  Post"") 

"We  have  plenty  of  black  coffee  and  we'll  be  here  until 
daylight."  "We  have  plenty  of  blade  coffee  and  we'll  be  here  until 
daylight.  "  "We  have  plenty  of  blade  coffee  and  ..." 

Over  and  over  again  the  booming  voice  of  Carl  Sandburg 
repeated  the  ironic  words  while  the  sandry-eyed  members  of  the  CBS 
documentary  unit  "rocked"  the  tape  recording  back  and  forth  across 
the  pickup  head.  The  ice  water  jug  was  long  since  dry  and  daylight 
was  indeed  approaching. 

At  the  witching  hour  of  midnight,  betwixt  Friday  and 
Saturday,  Lincoln  scholars  had  Joined  the  Library  of  Congress  staff 
to  open  the  vaults  containing  the  famous  Lincoln  papers.  Hard,  and 
noisily,  on  the  heels  of  the  Lincoln  scholars  came  a  horde  of  news¬ 
reel  cameramen,  photographers,  reporters  and  the  CBS  documentary 
unit. 

With  a  tape  recorder,  the  CBS  men  had  picked  up  the 
alternating  babble  and  hush,  the  reading  of  Robert  T.  Lincoln's 
bequest  of  the  papers  by  Dr.  Luther  Evans,  the  muffled  clicking  of 
the  tumblers  in  the  safe.  As  soon  as  the  historians  had  one  quick 
peek  at  the  164  bound  volumes  of  documents,  Commentator  John  Daly 
had  slipped  a  microphone  in  front  of  them  to  catch  "a  few  words" 
for  posterity. 

By  1:30  A. M.  the  Lincoln  scholars  had  begun  working  on 
the  18,350  documents  and  the  "plenty  of  black  coffee".  3y  1:30 
the  CBS  men  were  back  at  the  WTOP  studios,  drinking  ice  water  and 
processing  the  tape. 

From  1:30  until  4  A.M.  they  processed.  Excess  verbiage, 
long  pauses  and  unseemly  noises  like  "down  in  front,  you  guys";  were 
cut  out.  How?  With  scissors.  The  pieces  were  sutured  together 
with  sticky  tape. 

In  two  and  a  half  hours,  $)  proximate ly  two  and  a  half  min¬ 
utes  had  been  snipped  -  by  word,  by  sentence  and  by  paragraph  - 
from  the  tape  recording.  Originally  it  had  been  a  haphazard,  pro¬ 
tracted  piece.  When  it  was  finished,  it  was  well-integrated  and 
polished  -  a  dramatic  seven-minute  prelude  for  the  half-hour  broad¬ 
cast  into  which  it  was  fitted  the  following  afternoon. 


South  American  Ban  Hits  Radio  Exports 

(  "New  York  Time  s  " ) 

Recent  restrictions  on  importation  of  "luxuries"  by  Central 
and  South  American  countries,  except  Cuba  aid  Venezuela,  constitute 
a  serious  threat  to  e  xport  volume  of  radio  producers.  Max  Abrams, 
Treasurer,  Emerson  Radio  and  Phonograph  Corporation,  said  In  an 
interview  last  week.  He  explained  that  the  full  effect  of  the  ban 
imposed  during  June  on  imports  of  radios,  refrigerators  and  auto¬ 
mobiles  by  most  Latin-American  countries  is  being  felt  acutely 
here. 


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He ini  Radio  News  Service 


8/13/47 


TRADE  NOTES 


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The  Radio  Manufacturers'  Association  export  committee 
will  meet  Aug.  19  in  Chicago  to  launch  plans  for  further  promotion 
of  the  export  trade  and  to  discuss  barriers  raised  by  foreign  na¬ 
tions  against  radio  imports  from  this  country. 

Exports  of  .American-made  radio  receivers  and  components 
are  expected  to  set  a  record  this  year,  despite  the  fact  that  some 
countries,  notably  Mexico,  have  taken  steps  to  restrict  imports  to 
conserve  dollar  credits. 


Scott  Radio  Laboratories,  Inc.  -  Year  to  May  31:  Net 
Income,  $178,663  or  45  cents  a  share,  against  $111,075  or  28  cents 
a  share  for  previous  year;  net  sales,  $3,222,863  against  $4,544,649. 

The  number  of  installed  television  sets  in  the  Chicago 
area,  which  includes  the  suburbs,  has  Jumped  over  1,000$  within  the 
past  eight  months,  according  to  a  survey  conducted  for  W3K3,  the 
Balaban  &  Katz  television  station.  It  was  found  that  as  of  July  29 
that  these  sets  totalled  4,331,  as  compared  to  the  425  sets  that 
prevailed  in  the  same  area  in  November,  1946. 

A  disclosure  of  the  checkup  was  that  despite  the  demand 
among  tavernkeepers  for  tele  receivers  since  the  first  of  the  year 
the  number  of  video  screens  in  the  home  led  the  tavern  group. 


The  Federal  Communications  Commission  has  appointed  Max 
Goldman  to  the  position  of  Assistant  Chief  of  the  Litigation  and 
Administration  Division,  anew  post  created  to  aid  in  the  handling  of 
the  greatly  increased  volume  of  litigation  and  other  work  of  the 
Division.  Mr.  Goldman  served  with  the  Commission  since  August  1941, 
except  for  the  period  from  September  1944  through  October  1945  when 
he  was  employed  as  Law  Clerk  to  Judge  Learned  Hand  of  the  United 
States  Circuit  Court  of  Appeals  for  the  Second  Circuit. 


Hytron  Radio  &  Electronic  Corp.  -  Five  months  to  May  31: 
Net  earnings,  $43,855.  No  comparison  available. 


Seven  thousand  employees  of  the  nationwide  Japanese  Broad¬ 
casting  Corporation  in  Tokyo  have  demanded  special  "crisis”  allow¬ 
ances  averaging  7000  yen  per  worker  by  August  18,  The  workers* 
union  also  asked  management  to  raise  the  basic  wage  scale  from  1800 
yen  to  2500  yen  per  month. 

The  Government  disclosed  this  week  that  it  was  using  radar 
to  search  for  new  sources  of  oil  in  the  tidelands  off  the  continent¬ 
al  United  States.  With  the  country  facing  a  shortage  of  petroleum 
and  light  fuels,  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  revealed  that 
it  had  authorized  several  exploration  parties  to  use  radar  bands  as 
modern  "divining  rods"  to  find  hidden  oil  resources. 


-  15  - 


He lnl  Radio  News  Serv ice 


8/13/4? 


Three  new  books  on  television  have  made  their  appearance: 

"Television  Techniques",  by  Hoyland  Hettinger,  237  pp, 
Harper  and  Bros.  $5. ;  "Television  Primer  of  production  and  Direc¬ 
tion",  by  Louis  A.  sposa,  237  pp.  ,  illustrated,  New  York:  McGraw1- 
Hill.  $3,50,  and  "Getting  A  Job  In  Television"  by  John  Southwell, 
120  pp.  illustrated,  New  York:  McGraw-Hill.  $2. 

Weston  Electrical  Instrument  Corporation  -  Six  months: 

Net  income,  $406,652  or  $2,53  each  on  160,583  shares,  against 
$618,820  or  $3.85  a  share  last  year. 

Winston  Churchill  will  broadcast  to  the  British  nation 
from  London  Sunday  at  9:15  P.M.  (4:15  P.M.  EDT)  in  reply  to  Prime 
Minister  Attlee's  broadcast  appeal  to  the  people  last  Sunday. 

At  this  writing  no  announcement  has  been  made,  but  it  is 
expected  the  speech  will  be  carried  by  at  least  one  of  the  U. S.  Net¬ 
works. 

Two  Zenith  radios  play  parts  in  MGM's  movie  "The  Huck¬ 
sters".  A  Zenith  provides  the  musical  setting  as  Ava  Gardner  pre¬ 
pares  dinner  for  two.  The  company's  Transoceanic  shortwave  portable 
was  chosen  by  MGM  to  provide  outdoor  music  for  the  swimming  pool 
scene. 


Decca  Records,  Inc.  -  Sixmonths:  Net  profit,  $889,149, 
equal  to  $1.14  a  share,  compared  with  $967,534,  or  $1.25  a  share  last 
year. 


Edward  Delaney,  American  born  author  and  radio  announcer, 
was  held  in  $10,000  bail  last  Friday  in  New  York  on  a  charge  of 
treason  alleging  he  broadcast  political  propaganda  from  Berlin  dur¬ 
ing  the  war. 

Delaney,  born  in  Olney,  Ill. ,  had  been  in  Europe  since 
1939  and  was  brought  back  under  Army  orders  but  at  his  own  expense. 

He  was  indicted  by  a  Washington  grand  jury  for  treason  in  July, 1943, 
but  the  case  will  be  presented  to  a  New  York  jury  under  a  requirement 
that  persons  accused  of  treason  be  tried  in  the  district  in  which  they 
land  from  abroad. 

To  assure  the  privacy  of  facsimile  machine  communications, 
Charles  J.  Young  of  Princeton,  N.J.  has  invented  and  assigned  to 
the  Radio  Corporation  of  America,  a  secret  communication  system 
(No.  2,425,076)  wherein  a  movable  member  at  the  transmitter  and  a 
corresponding  movable  member  at  the  receiver  are  caused  to  have  sub¬ 
stantially  identical  speed  variations.  Any  desired  synchronizing 
and  phasing  scheme  may  be  employed,  the  secrecy  feature  being  ob¬ 
tained  locally  at  the  transmitter  and  at  the  receiver  by  a  predeter¬ 
mined  speed  plan. 


The  National  Broadcasting  Company's  television  network 
will  televise  the  home  football  games  of  the  Navy  this  Fall*  It  is 
planned  that  the  games  will  also  be  transmitted  to  NBC's  New  York 
television  station  W  N3T  by  Bell  System  coaxial  cable  for  integra¬ 
tion  with  the  NBC  television  network's  coverage  of  other  leading 
college  football  ganes. 


XXXXXXXX 


-  16  - 


Founded  in  1924 


HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 


V - 

Radio  —  Television 

—  FM  — 

Communications 

2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 

Washington  8,  D.  C. 

Robert 

D.  Heinl,  Editor 

/  / 

/ 

/ 

/ 


c4 


INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  AUGUST  20,  1947 


F.D.R.  Had  Short-Wave  Set  In  White  House  Bomb-Proof  Shelter...! 


WQQW  Votes  Not  to  Sell  "Blue  Book"  Station  Now . 3 

Shakelford,  RCA,  Slated  For  Next  IRE  President . 4 

Drew  Pearson  Plans  to  Break  Up  W.Va.  Press-Radio  Monopolies .. .6 

National  Standards  Bureau  Appoints  Reber,  Radio  Physicist . 6 

Ban  On  Washington,  D.  C.  Street  Loudspeakers . 6 


Press  Wireless  Wins  Help  of  Referee  in  Bankruptcy  Petition. ... 7 
Mackay  Radio  Contests  Press  Wireless  Non-Press  Service  Bid.... 8 


Philco  Earns  $2,425,121  in  Second  Quarter  of  1947 . 9 

One  Telephone  Operator  You  Can't  Talk  Back  To. . 9 

Petrillo  Ban  Is  Blow  To  FM:  -  Holds  Off  Making  Records . 10 

Dawson  Is  New  -naB  Assistant  Information  Director . 11 

Benton  Offers  To  Share  Short  Waves  With  Smaller  Nations . 12 

Scissors  And  Paste . 13 

Trade  Notes . 15 


August  20,  19^7 


FDR  HAD  SHORT-WAVE  SET  IN  WHITE  HOUSE  BOMB-PROOF  SHELTER 


That  during  the  War  President  Roosevelt  had  a  short-wave 
set  secretly  installed  in  the  White  House  bomb-proof  air-raid 
shelter  is  revealed  by  Merriman  Smith,  United  Press  White  House 
correspondent,  in  his  book,  "Thank  You,  Mr.  President".  Behind 
high  board  fences  to  prevent  the  public  from  knowing  what  was  go¬ 
ing  on,  a  tunnel  was  first  dug  across  from  the  White 'House  to  the 
Treasury  where  the  President  could  use  the  lower  Treasury  vault  as 
his  air-raid  refuge  until  a  shelter  could  be  built  under  the  new 
East  Wing  of  the  White  House.  It  had  walls  9  ft.  thick,  included 
a  small  kitchen,  two  bathrooms,  a  first  aid  room,  double,  air-tight 
steel  doors,  and  as  a  final  precaution,  a  powerful  short-wave  send¬ 
ing  and  receiving  set  equipped  with  generators  fed  by  independent 
motors.  Thus,  even  if  the  regular  power  went  dead.  President 
Roosevelt  could  have  kept  in  communication  with  the  outside  world 
without  interruption. 

Mr.  Smith's  book,  advertised  as  a  Harper  &  Brothers' 
"find",  and  which  quickly  reached  the  list  of  best  sellers  of  the 
year,  refers  to  other  things  of  radio  interest. 

For  instance,  on  the  day  of  President  Roosevelt's  death 
at  Warm  Springs,  he  was  to  have  attended  an  old-fashioned  Georgia 
barbecue  and  the  bam  in  which  it  was  to  have  been  held  was  also 
equipped  with  short-wave  radio  units  for  the  Secret  Service.  It 
was  through  this  transmitter,  in  fact,  that  Smith  received  the 
first  intimation  that  something  had  gone  wrong  with  the  President 
on  that  fatal  day.  Likewise,  Shangri-La,  President  Roosevelt's 
hideaway  in  nearby  Maryland,  had  a  communications  shack  which  con¬ 
tained  a  small  switch-board  with  direct  connections  to  the  White 
House  and  short-wave  radio  facilities. 

The  author  gives  a  vivid  picture  of  the  scene  at  the 
White  House  just  before  President  Truman  made  his  famous  broadcast 
threatening  to  use  the  army  to  break  the  railroad  strike. 

"His  radio  speech  was  written  like  a  hot  news  story  just 
before  edition  time"  Mr.  Smith  writes.  "Actually,  the  last  draft 
of  the  copy  he  read  on  the  air  was  completed  only  four  minutes 
before  he  sat  down  in  the  Oval  Room  of  the  White  House  and  started 
speaking  into  the  microphones  of  four  networks. 

"As  the  President's  'reading  copy'  was  completed  sheet 
at  a  time,  Leonard  Reinsch,  Mr.  Truman's  radio  advisor,  ran  over 
the  text  with  him.  At  four  minutes  to  ten,  the  last  sheet  was 
rushed  to  the  President  in  the  Oval  Room.  At  ten,  he  looked  at 
Reinsch  who  brought  down  his  arm  in  a  sharp  gesture  to  signal  the 
President  that  he  was  on  the  air." 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/20/47 


Mr.  Smith  tells  about  the  wartime  innovation  on  the 
presidential  train,  and  now  a  fixed  piece  of  equipment,  “the 
miraculous  radio  car  developed  by  the  Army  Signal  Corps.  Whether 
rolling  or  not,  the  radio  car  maintains  constant  communication 
with  the  White  House  through  short  wave  and  radio  teletype.  Thus 
the  President  always  has  at  his  command  instantaneous  communication 
facilities  with  every  other  world  capital." 

The  author  makes  an  interesting  comparison  of  the  speak¬ 
ing  abilities  of  Mr.  Roosevelt  and  former  Prime  Minister  Churchill: 

"Churchill  was  a  great,  dramatic  showman  and  actually  a 
better  speaker  than  Mr.  Roosevelt.  Churchill's  speeches  during 
the  war  contained  much  finer  rhetoric  than  the  Roosevelt  speeches, 
but  when  it  came  to  radio  technique,  Churchill  could  not  come 
close. 


"To  Mr.  Roosevelt,  the  microphone  was  as  much  of  a 
political  instrument  as  a  ward  leader.  He  knew  how  to  use  radio 
with  quality  rarely  approached  by  political  contemporaries.  His 
deep  resonant  voice  was  an  organ  upon  which  he  played  with  the 
skill  of  a  fine  musician. " 

Mr.  Smith  gives  a  very  realistic  description  of  the 
White  House  press  and  radio  conferences.  Speaking  of  the  first 
of  these  ordeals,  he  writes: 

"The  President  was  as  nervous  as  a  Derby  favorite  at 
the  barrier.  He  started  three  times  before  the  reporters  were  all 
in  the  room.  Three  hundred  press  and  radio  reporters  were  present. 
Knowing  his  habit  of  speaking  rapidly,  I  asked,  'Will  you  take  it 
sort  of  slow  for  us  today?' 

"The  President  said  he  would;  glad  to  do  anything  he 
could  to  accommodate  the  reporters." 

The  author  speaks  in  detail  of  the  secret  trip  to  the 
Pacific  during  the  war  where,  before  leaving  the  country. 

President  Roosevelt  accepted  his  renomination  in  a  radio  address 
on  the  Pacific  Coast,  then  sailed  quietly  for  Hawaii  without  the 
public  being  aware  that  he  was  absent  from  the  United  States. 

Mr.  Smith  writes: 

"It  was  difficult  for  the  three  wire  service  reporters 
and  the  one  radio  'pool'  man  -  Carleton  Smith  of  N.B.C.  -  to  get 
information  that  would  stick.  *  *  *  * 

"Admiral  Brown  told  me  that  we  would  have  to  put  a 
Washington  date  line  on  the  story  and  say  nothing  about  the 
President's  real  whereabouts.  I  bucked  at  that;  told  him  a 
Washington  dateline  would  be  an  outright  lie  and  that  security  or 


2 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/20/47 


no  security,  the  United  Press  could  not  go  along  with  a  project  of 
such  ridiculous  proportions. 

"The  President  had  been  seen  by  thousands  of  people  on 
the  way  to  the  Vest  Coast  and  I  didn't  get  the  point  of  the 
Admiral's  super  secrecy." 

Mr.  Smith  then  tells  how  he  got  to  the  President 
personally  on  this  matter  and  said:  "Mr.  President  the  Navy  tells 
me  that  we  must  put  a  Washington  dateline  on  your  speech  tonight. 
You  know  that  would  be  outright  dishonesty  and  we  just  can't  do 
it." 


"'Oh  damn,  that's  a  lot  of  nonsense,'  the  President 
replied.  'I  say  in  the  first  paragraph  of  my  speech  that  I  am 
speaking  from  a  West  Coast  naval  base.  Why  not  use  that  for  a 
dateline? ' 

"'That  is  fine,  Mr.  President.  We'll  use  it.'" 

Some  of  those  who  attended  the  White  House  Correspond¬ 
ents'  Dinner  in  the  Spring  of  1944  wondered  if  Bob  Hope,  the  radio 
comedian  had  not  been  a  little  too  rough  in  a  reference  which  he 
made  to  Mrs.  Roosevelt. 

"I  sat  by  the  President  that  night  and  Hope  will  never 
know  how  much  Mr.  Roosevelt  enjoyed  his  gentle  -  sometimes  not  so 
gentle  -  kidding",  Mr.  Smith  writes. 

"Mr.  Roosevelt  got  a  terrific  kick  out  of  Hope's  routine. 
Once  was  when  Bob  told  how  Churchill  wanted  another  conference 
with  the  President. 

"'Churchill  wants  to  figure  out  how  to  open  a  second 
front  and  still  keep  Eleanor  out  of  the  crossfire'",  Hope 
shouted. 


"The  President  laughed  so  hard  that  he  groaned." 

XXXXXXXX 

WQQW  VOTES  NOT  TO  SELL  "BLUE  BOOK"  STATION  NOW 

More  than  100  stockholders  of  Radio  Station  WQQW  In 
Washington,  D.  C.,  last  Monday  night  (August  l8)  refused  to  con¬ 
sider  sale  of  the  station  —  at  least  for  two  weeks. 

The  owners  unanimously  resolved,  during  a  three -hour 
closed  meeting  at  the  station,  to  "explore  further  the  possibili¬ 
ties  of  continued  operation." 


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8/20/47 


Its  directors  a  month  ago  decided  to  call  the  stock¬ 
holders  together  to  determine  what  is  to  become  of  the  ‘'good  music 
station.” 


The  stockholders  last  night  voted  to  meet  again  at  8:30 
p.m.  September  3*  More  than  half  of  the  approximately  180  stock¬ 
holders  were  present. 

The  1000-watt  station  modeled  along  the  lines  of  the 
FCC’s  famous  "Blue  Book"  attracted  Nation-wide  attention  when  it 
started  last  January  5  as  a  "listener -owned"  station  with 
restricted  commercials. 

Edward  Brecher,  ex-FCC  publicist  who  was  in  its  Law 
Department  and  helped  prepare  the  "Blue  Book",  was  the  prime-mover 
behind  WQQW.  There  was  set  forth  a  "bill  of  rights"  for  the 
listener,  -  promises  of  good  (classical) music  and  promises  of  only 
one  commercial  each  15  minutes.  Of  late  there  have  been  rumors 
that  the  station  is  as  much  as  $180,000  in  the  red  and  that  Drew 
Pearson  had  offered  $110,000  for  it. 

XXXXXXXX 

SHAKELF0RD,  RCA,  SLATED  FOR  NEXT  IRE  PRESIDENT 

B.  E.  Shake If ord  has  been  nominated  for  the  presidency 
of  the  Institute  of  Radio  Engineers  for  1948.  Dr.  Shakelford  is 
manager  of  the  license  department  of  R.C.A.  International  Division, 
New  York.  Election  returns  will  be  final  October  24,  1947.  R.  L. 
Smith -Rose,  superintendent  of  the  radio  division  of  the  National 
Physical  Laboratory,  Teddington,  England  has  been  nominated  for 
the  vice-presidency  of  the  Institute. 

Two  directors-at-large  will  be  elected  for  the  period 
1948-1950  from  the  following  nominees: 

B.  deF.  Bayly,  consulting  engineer  at  the  University 
of  Toronto,  Canada;  A.  B.  Chamberlain,  chief  engineer  of 
the  Columbia  Broadcasting  system.  New  York;  J.  E.  Shepherd, 
research  engineer,  Sperry  Gyroscope  Company,  Great  Neck, 

L.  I.,  and  J.  E.  Stratton,  director  of  the  research 
laboratory  of  electronics,  Massachusetts  Institute  of 
Technology,  Cambridge. 

One  regional  director  will  be  elected  for  each 
designated  region  from  the  following  nominees,  for  1948: 

The  North  Central  Atlantic  Region: 

J.V.L.  Hogan,  president  of  Faximile,  Inc.,  New  York; 

F.  A.  Polkinghorn,  Bell  Telephone  Laboratories,  New  York, 
and  H.  P.  Westman,  associate  editor  of  "Electrical 


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8/20/47 


Communication,"  International  Telephone  and  Telegraph 
Corporation,  New  York. 

The  East  Central  Region: 

V.  A.  Dickinson,  Sylvania  Products,  Emporium, 

Pa.;  P.  L.  Hoover,  professor  of  electrical  engineering. 
Case  School  of  Applied  Science,  Cleveland,  and  J.  A. 
Hutcheson,  associate  director  of  research,  Westinghouse 
Electric  Corporation,  East  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

The  Southern  Region: 

Ben  Akerman,  chief  engineer,  WGST,  Atlanta;  and 
A.  E.  Cullum,  Jr.,  consulting  radio  engineer,  Dallas, 
Texas. 

The  Canadian  Region: 

F.  S.  Howes,  associate  professor  of  electrical 
engineering,  McGill  University,  Montreal,  Canada,  and 
F.H.R.  Pounsett,  chief  engineer,  Stromberg  Carlson, 

Ltd.,  Toronto,  Canada. 

One  regional  director  will  be  elected  for  each  desig¬ 
nated  Region  from  the  following  nominees,  for  1948  and  1949: 

The  North  Atlantic  Region: 

L.  E.  Packard,  treasurer  of  Technology  Instrument 
Corporation,  Waltham,  Mass.,  and  H.  J.  Reich,  professor 
of  electrical  engineering  at  Dunham  Laboratory,  Yale 
University,  New  Haven,  Conn. 

The  Central  Atlantic  Region: 

J.  B.  Coleman  of  Haddonfield,  N.  J.;  assistant 
director  of  engineering.  Radio  Corporation  of  America, 
Camden,  N.  J. 

The  Central  Region: 

T.  A.  Hunter,  president  of  the  Hunter  Manufactur¬ 
ing  Company,  Iowa  City,  Iowa,  and  W.  0.  Swinyard,  chief 
engineer,  Hazeltine  Research,  Inc.,  Chicago,  Ill. 

The  Pacific  Region: 

F.  E.  Terman,  dean  of  the  school  of  engineering, 
Stanford  University,  Palo  Alto,  California. 

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DREW  PEARSON  PLANS  TO  BREAK  UP  W.  VA.  PRESS-RADIO  MONOPOLIES 

Drew  Pearson,  Washington  radio  commentator  and 
columnist,  plans  to  establish  one  or  two  daily  newspapers  in  West 
Virginia  ''to  break  up  some  monopolies." 

Mr.  Pearson  named  Wheeling  as  the  likely  starting  point 
for  the  venture.  Both  newspapers  there  are  operated  by  the  Ogden 
chain,  property  of  the  late  H.  C.  Ogden  estate. 

"I  have  long  contemplated  bucking  some  of  the  newspaper 
monopolies,  where  one  company  dominates  the  field  with  newspapers 
and  radio  stations,"  he  declared. 

He  said  the  project  will  be  undertaken  "with  some  other 
people,"  but  declined  to  name  them.  Possible  second  point  for 
establishment  of  a  newspaper  would  be  Parkersburg,  he  said. 

XXXXXXXX 

NATIONAL  STANDARDS  BUREAU  APPOINTS  REBER,  RADIO  PHYSICIST 

Grote  Reber,  35-year-old  radio  physicist  and  engineer, 
has  been  appointed  to  the  staff  of  the  National  Bureau  of 
Standards. 


Reber  is  to  direct  several  new  projects  aimed  at  extend¬ 
ing  present  knowledge  of  conditions  indirectly  affecting  radio 
communication.  He  will  investigate  the  sources  of  radio  noise, 
both  cosmic  and  solar. 

A  B.S.  graduate  of  the  Illinois  Institute  of  Technology 
in  1933,  Reber  has  done  graduate  work  in  physics  at  the  University 
of  Chicago,  and  is  the  author  of  technical  papers  in  the  electrical 
engineering  and  interstellar  static  fields. 

He  is  now  supervising  erection  of  a  German  Giant  Wurz¬ 
burg,  an  extremely  large  and  powerful  radar  device  which  will  be 
used  to  detect  solar  and  cosmic  radiations  that  penetrate  the 
earth's  atmosphere, 


XXX  XXX  X  X 

BAN  ON  WASHINGTON,  D.  C.  STREET  LOUDSPEAKERS 

Clark  P.  King,  assistant  corporation  counsel  in  the 
Criminal  Division  of  Municipal  Court  in  Washington,  D.  C., 
announced  this  week  that  shop  owners  with  noisy  devices  have 
until  September  15  to  turn  off  blaring  loudspeakers  in  the 
vicinity  of  radio  stores  and  elsewhere. 


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After  that,  he  will  prosecute  owners  of  offending 
devices,  he  said,  and  impose  stiff  penalties  under  the  application 
of  the  code,  which  provides  a  maximum  of  $300  fine  or  90  days  in 
jail,  or  both. 

King  estimated  he  had  received  about  100  complaints 
recently  about  loudspeakers  sounding  off  outside  of  stores,  from 
people  who  told  him  the  mechanical  noise  kept  them  from  (l)  sleep¬ 
ing,  (2)  hearing  their  own  radios,  (3)  carrying  on  conversations 
or  (4)  walking  along  sidewalks  blocked  by  impromptu  radio-televi- 
sion  audiences. 

Prosecutions  will  follow  justified  police  or  citizen 
complaints  after  September  15,  King  said,  who  added  that  the 
District  has  been  lenient  up  to  now  because  there  were  few  com¬ 
plaints  until  recently,  when  the  racket  apparently  became  worse. 
The  District  has  been  enforcing  anti-blast  statutes  only  in  cases 
where  the  noise  has  brought  complaints. 

XXXXXXXX 

PRESS  WIRELESS  WINS  HELP  OF  REFEREE  IN  BANKRUPTCY  PETITION 

Orders  were  signed  last  Saturday  by  Federal  Referee 
Irwin  Kurtz  permitting  Press  Wireless,  Inc.,  of  1475  Broadway,  to 
continue  in  business  and  enjoining  two  creditors  from  proceeding 
with  court  actions  in  a  reorganization  proceeding  under  the 
National  Bankruptcy  Act  filed  in  Federal  Court  last  Friday.  Press 
Wireless  transmits  wireless  press  dispatches  between  this  and 
foreign  countries. 

A.  Warren  Norton,  president  of  the  organization,  filed 
a  petition  on  Friday  for  an  arrangement  to  pay  off  creditors  in 
full  over  a  period  of  three  years  and  listing  liabilities  at 
$1,205,946.27  and  assets  at  $1,832,218.73. 

Referee  Kurtz*  orders  enjoin  Maguire  Industries,  Inc., 
from  proceeding  with  an  action  brought  against  Press  Wireless  in 
Supreme  Court,  New  York  County,  to  recover  $45,993*80  for  goods 
sold  and  delivered  and  stays  Woolford  Production,  Inc.,  from 
proceeding  with  a  suit  in  Municipal  Court  to  collect  $234. 

One  order  not  only  stays  the  two  specific  suits  but 
also  any  other  suit  that  may  be  contemplated.  The  second  order 
continuing  Press  Wireless  in  business  authorizes  it  to  conduct 
business  in  the  usual  way  and  pay  all  new  indebtedness  as  it  is 
incurred. 


The  concern's  largest  unsecured  creditor  is  the 
Ministry  of  Posts,  Telegraph  and  Telephone,  Paris,  with  a  claim 
of  $164,269  against  the  organization.  Other  creditors  include 

-  7  - 


!  ,  . 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/20/47 


the  Chinese  Government  Radio  Administration,  The  New  York  Times, 
The  Associated  Press,  International  News  Service,  The  New  York 
Herald  Tribune,  The  United  Press  and  the  United  States  Treasury. 

Press  Wireless  was  established  in  1929  by  a  group  of 
newspapers  as  "a  copy  boy  for  the  press  of  the  world."  In  1936, 
Press  Wireless  handled  8,184,549  words  of  press  messages.  In 
1945  business  reached  the  peak  of  63,112,941  words. 

XXXXXXXX 

MACKAY  RADIO  CONTESTS  PRESS  WIRELESS  NON-PRESS  SERVICE  BID 

Intervening  in  the  application  of  Press  Wireless  for 
modification  of  licenses  to  handle  deferred  commercial  messages. 
All  America-  Cables  &  Radio,  Mackay  Radio  and  associated 
companies  state  that  such  a  grant  for  non-press  users  would  be 
inconsistent  with  the  purposes  for  which  frequencies  were 
allocated  to  meet  the  news  requirements  of  the  American  press 
and  would  not  be  in  the  public  interest. 

According  to  a  brief  filed  with  the  FCC  by  James  A. 
Kennedy,  attorney  for  the  intervenors,  there  are  ample  cable  and 
radio  facilities  and  transmission  capacity  available  in  the  com¬ 
munications  systems  of  other  carriers  to  serve  each  of  the  15 
countries  to  which  Press  Wireless  proposes  to  offer  a  limited 
commercial  service  for  non-press  users  and  that  such  service  as 
Press  Wireless  might  provide  would  be  limited  in  scope  and  "even 
assuming  foreign  agreement  to  the  handling  of  such  service  could 
be  obtained,  it  does  not  appear  that  such  revenues  as  Press  Wire¬ 
less  might  thereby  obtain  would  be  sufficient  to  alleviate  in  any 
important  respect  its  present  financial  difficulies.  This  is 
especially  so  since  Applicant  is  not  now  offering,  as  it  had 
originally  proposed,  to  handle  commercial  deferred  and  nightletter 
traffic  at  less  than  the  standard  rates  applied  by  other  carriers. 
Moreover,  Press  Wireless,  having  public  telegraph  offices  in 
only  three  cities,  New  York,  Washington,  D.  C.  and  San  Francisco, 
would  not  share  in  the  unrouted  traffic  originated  at  interior 
points  in  the  United  States  by  Western  Union." 

"Moreover,  a  departure  from  the  principle  of  allocating 
'radio  frequencies  exclusively  for  the  transmission  of  news'  would 
be  inconsistent  with  the  purposes  for  which  the  Press  Wireless  was 
created  and  contrary  to  the  views  expressed  on  behalf  of  the 
American  Newspaper  Publishers  Association  as  recently  as  two  years 
ago . " 


XXXXXXXX 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/20/47 


PHILCO  EARNS  $2,425,121  IN  SECOND  QUARTER  OP  1947 

Net  income  from  operations  of  Philco  Corporation  in  the 
second  quarter  of  1947  totaled  $1,626,974  after  all  taxes  and 
charges  including  an  inventory  reserve  of  $1,200,000,  and  reserve 
for  future  research  expenditures,  and  was  equivalent,  after 
preferred  dividends,  to  $1.12  per  share  of  common  stock.  In 
addition,  there  was  net  non-recurring  income  of  $798,147  after 
taxes,  or  58  cents  per  common  share,  so  that  total  earnings  for 
the  quarter  amounted  to  $2,425,121  or  $1.70  per  share  after 
preferred  dividends. 

In  the  first  quarter  of  1947,  net  income  totaled 
$1,609,754  after  taxes  and  charges  including  an  inventory  reserve 
of  $1,300,000,  and  was  equivalent  to  $1.10  per  share  of  common 
stock  after  allowing  for  preferred  dividends.  In  the  second 
quarter  of  1946,  when  operations  were  just  beginning  to  recover 
from  reconversion  difficulties,  net  income  amounted  to  $14,787. 

Sales  (including  excise  taxes)  of  Philco  Corporation  in 
the  second  quarter  of  1947  amounted  to  $57,754,000  as  compared 
with  $50,187,000  in  the  first  quarter  of  this  year,  and 
$22,861,000  in  the  second  quarter  of  1946. 

XXXXXXXX 

ONE  TELEPHONE  OPERATOR  YOU  CAN'T  TALK  BACK  TO 

For  three  weeks,  the  WT0P-CBS  Washington,  D.  C.,  switch¬ 
board  queen  will  be  able  to  talk  to  thousands  of  people  secure  in 
the  knowledge  that  not  one  can  talk  back  to  her. 

For  Miss  Marie  McGrain,  veteran  switchboard  operator, 
will  substitute  for  "Uncle  Bill"  Jenkins  on  the  5:30-7:30  AM 
"Corn  Squeezin'"  morning  program  while  Uncle  Bill  takes  a  vacation 
starting  August  25. 

Deep-voiced  Marie,  famed  for  her  salty,  direct  talk, 
never  before  has  had  a  program.  She  has  seldom  appeared  on  the 
air.  But  her  telephone  training  at  switchboards  in  Washington 
in  the  Raleigh  Hotel,  the  old  Congressional  Apartments  and  the 
Union  Station  -fwhere  she  was  the  first  woman  employee  and  chief 
operator  for  10  years),  gives  her  plenty  of  experience  in  talking 
to  any  and  every  one.  And  for  three  glorious  weeks  they  can't 
talk  back! 


XXXXXXXX 


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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


8/20/47 


PETRILLO  BAN  IS  BLOW  TO  PM;  HOLDS  OFF  MAKING  RECORDS 

Opinion  in  Washington  was  that  James  C.  Petrillo, 
president  of  the  American  Federation  of  Musicians  in  refusing  to 
lift  his  prohibition  against  the  simultaneous  broadcasting  of 
music  on  AM  (standard)  and  FM  (frequency  modulation)  radio  sta¬ 
tions  had  further  gummed  up  the  FM  situation.  Justin  Miller, 
president  of  the  National  Association  of  Broadcasters,  predicted 
serious  delay  in  the  development  of  FM.  J.  N.  Bailey,  director 
of  the  FM  Association,  contended  that  the  Petrillo  ban  con¬ 
stituted  a  violation  of  the  Taft-Hartley  Labor  Law  and  the  Lea 
"Anti-Petrillo"  Act.  Mr.  Bailey  declared  his  intention  of  call¬ 
ing  Petrillo' s  action  to  the  attention  of  the  Department  of 
Justice . 


Simultaneously  with  the  FM  edict  Mr.  Petrillo  declared 
in  Chicago  that  the  American  Federation  of  Musicians  had  decided 
to  set  aside  for  the  time  being  at  least  its  plan  to  manufacture 
its  own  musical  recordings  for  broadcasts.  He  said:  "It  looks 
like  we  would  be  brought  into  court  on  charges  of  violating  the 
anti-trust  act  if  we  made  records.  We  don't  want  to  fool  around 
with  the  laws  of  the  country.'* 

The  text  of  Mr.  Petrillo' s  telegram  sent  from  his 
Chicago  headquarters  to  the  presidents  of  the  four  networks  read: 

"Since  our  meeting  of  July  in  Chicago,  at  which  we  dis¬ 
cussed  AM  and  FM  broadcasting,  consideration  has  been  given  to 
your  request  to  permit  members  of  the  American  Federation  of 
Musicians  to  render  service  for  both  AM  and  FM  programs 
simultaneously. 

"The  federation  holds  that  FM  broadcasting  is  separate 
and  distinct  from  AM  broadcasting.  The  Federal  Communications 
Commission  licenses  each  FM  station  separately,  assigns  individ¬ 
ual  call  letters  and  channels,  and  the  station  is  required  to 
comply  with  all  FCC  regulations. 

"Many  FM  stations  have  no  affiliation  with  either  an 
AM  station  or  a  network,  and  could  not  possibly  enjoy  the 
benefits  of  AM  programs  even  if  the  federation  were  willing  to 
permit  this  dual  service. 

"Certainly  the  FM  station  with  no  AM  affiliation  is 
just  as  deserving  and  should  not  suffer  this  competition  dis¬ 
advantage.  Neither  should  the  federation  be  a  party  to  such 
discrimination. 

"We  must  bear  in  mind  that  the  number  of  FM  stations 
will  eventually  number  into  the  thousands,  and  the  present  net¬ 
work  facilities  could  not  possibly  feed  all  these  stations. 


10 


* 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/20/47 


"Locals  of  the  American  Federation  of  Musicians  are 
ready  and  willing  to  negotiate  wage  scales  and  conditions  for  FM 
broadcasting.  At  the  present  time  there  are  a  number  of  FM  sta¬ 
tions  employing  musicians  and  it  would  not  be  sound  policy  for 
the  federation  to  eliminate  this  employment  and  potential  employ¬ 
ment  in  other  stations  by  agreeing  to  service  both  AM  and  FM 
simultaneously. 

"The  Federation  does  not  insist  that  FM  stations  employ 
musicians  but  if  they  do  need  musicians  locals  will  be  ready  and 
willing  to  negotiate  contracts.  This  would  give  the  FM  stations 
the  benefit  of  live  music,  and  also  give  the  public  the  chance  to 
hear  FM,  and  in  return,  musicians  will  have  employment  opportuni¬ 
ties.  " 


Mr.  Petrillo  predicted  that  the  number  of  FM  stations, 
now  204,  would  be  increased  to  3,000  in  eighteen  months.  There 
are  1,320  licensed  AM  stations.  Almost  3,000  network  and  AM 
station  musicians  are  now  drawing  annual  salaries  of  almost 
$23,000,000,  he  said.  No  figures  were  available  on  the  number  of 
musicians  working  at  FM  stations. 

At  this  writing  no  comment  had  been  forthcoming  from 
the  networks  but  President  Miller  of  NAB  declared  that  Petrillo* s 
action  would  mean  a  continuation  of  the  FM  stalemate. 

XXXXXXXX 

DAWSON  IS  NEW  NAB  ASSISTANT  INFORMATION  DIRECTOR 

James  Dawson,  newspaper  and  radio  news  editor,  has 
been  named  assistant  director  of  information  of  the  National 
Association  of  Broadcasters.  At  present  Mr.  Dawson  is  news 
editor  and  director  of  programs  at  WFBC,  Greenville,  S.  C.,  a 
position  he  has  held  since  release  from  active  duty  as  a  naval 
reserve  officer.  His  four  years  in  the  Navy  included  three 
years  of  duty  as  a  combat  intelligence  officer  in  the  Pacific, 
beginning  in  the  Solomons  and  continuing  through  the  final  Third 
Fleet  campaign  off  the  coast  of  Japan. 

Prior  to  the  war,  Mr.  Dawson  operated  his  own  advertis¬ 
ing  agency,  Dawson,  Inc.,  in  Greenville,  having  previously 
served  as  managing  editor  of  the  Augusta,  (Ga.)  Chronicle .  He 
began  his  newspaper  career  as  a  member  of  the  Greenville  Piedmont 
editorial  staff,  and  was  subsequently  associate  managing  editor 
of  the  S.  C.  Newsview.  Mr.  Dawson  was  born  in  New  Bern,  North 
Carolina  in  1910  and  is  the  son  of  James  B.  Dawson,  well-known 
North  Carolina  newspaper  publisher. 


XXXXXXXX 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/20/47 


THEY  CAN'T  SEEM  TO  LEARN  -  "POMPEII"  BROADCAST  FOOLS  PUBLIC 

Mount  Vesuvius  "erupted"  so  realistically  during  last 
Monday  night's  radio  dramatization  of  "The  Last  Days  of  Pompeii" 
that  people  called  The  Washington  Star  and  Station  WTOP,  CBS  out¬ 
let  in  Washington,  D.  C.,  to  inquire  the  name  of  the  announcer 
who  "burned  with  the  buildings." 

Switchboards  at  The  Star  and  WTOP  became  busy  just 
after  the  lines  "Mount  Vesuvius  has  erupted,"  the  "old  mountain 
is  on  fire,"  and  "the  lions  are  running  out,"  crackled  through 
the  ether  to  District  listeners.  A  woman  inquired  if  it  was 
really  "true  that  Rome  was  burning." 

John  Daly,  correspondent  for  CBS  News  in  New  York, 
offered  an  explanation  after  stressing  that  the  broadcast  was 
only  a  play  and  recalling  the  excitement  when  Orson  Welles 
broadcast  his  drama  of  the  invasion  of  the  earth  by  men  from 
Mars. 


XXXXXXXX 

BENTON  OFFERS  TO  SHARE  SHORT  WAVES  WITH  SMALLER  NATIONS 

Wm.  Benton,  Assistant  Secretary  of  State,  addressing 
delegates  of  the  International  High  Frequency  Broadcasting  Con¬ 
ference  at  Atlantic  City  last  week  offered  to  relinquish  some  of 
the  short  broadcasting  facilities  of  the  United  States  to  enable 
smaller  nations  to  engage  in  world-wide  communication. 

"Frequency- sharing  is  an  innovation  in  international 
affairs.  At  first  glance  frequency- sharing  may  seem  to  entail 
a  loss  of  sovereignty. 

"However,  that  is  not  the  view  of  the  United  States. 
Frequency- sharing  appears  to  us  in  the  United  States  to  be  a 
means  through  which  high-frequency  broadcasting  can  continue  to 
grow  as  a  world  force. 

"It  may  be  necessary  for  some  nations  now  to  reduce 
their  operations  somewhat.  The  United  States  is  willing  to 
reduce  its  transmitters,  and  we  are  willing  to  accept  fewer 
frequencies  than  we  are  now  using.  If  other  nations  will  do 
the  same,  all  of  us  should  be  able  to  obtain  a  fair  and  equitable 
share  in  the  available  frequencies. 


XXXXXXXX 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/20/47 


SCISSORS  AND  PASTE  : : 


Warns  Against  FTC  Moving  In  On  Radio  Programs 

(Dorothy  Holloway  in  "Variety'1 ) 

A  strong  warning  that  if  the  Federal  Trade  Commission 
moves  against  the  broadcast  of  racing  results  and  track  info  as 
an  unfair  trade  practice,  "a  logical  extension  of  this  philosophy 
would  give  FTC  the  right  to  examine  the  content  of  every  radio 
program  on  the  air, "  is  contained  in  a  memorandum  filed  on  the 
q.t.  with  the  agency  by  Cohn  &  Marks,  counsel  for  WGAY,  Silver 
Spring,  Md.  The  counter-blast  against  FTC  entry  into  the  radio 
program  field  came  as  the  agency  mulled  the  first  request  in 
history  from  a  broadcaster  who  wants  the  Commission  to  restrain 
as  "unfair  competition"  a  racing  stint  on  WGAY  and  a  money-give- 
away  aired  by  WARL,  Arlington,  Va.  WWDC,  local  indie  which 
dropped  similar  shows  last  year,  asked  for  the  relief. 

The  entire  broadcast  industry  has  a  large  stake  in  the 
controversy,  it  is  believed,  since  FTC  authority  might  be  used  to 
bulwark  that  of  FCC  in  the  program  field.  And  an  increasing  num¬ 
ber  of  stations  are  fighting  stiffer  competition  by  resorting  to 
use  of  race  shows,  money-give-aways  and  quiz  shows  with  lottery¬ 
like  features. 


News  Still  At  Top  Of  List  In  Radio 

( Jerry  Walker  in  "Editor  &  Publisher" ) 

On  one  side  of  the  desk  is  Radio  Daily’s  annual  sympo¬ 
sium  on  "Radio  Programs....  What  Will  They  Be  Like?"  On  the 
other  side  is  a  copy  of  an  inter-department  memo  at  National 
Broadcasting  Co.  "To  Sydney  Eiges  from  H.  M.  Beville,  Jr.,  on 
the  subject.  Readership  Study." 

The  first,  the  outlook  for  radio  programming,  can  be 
disposed  of  quickly.  "Trends"  discerned  in  a  survey  of  636 
program  directors  give  a  decided  preference  to  Music  shows.  Next, 

right  up  there  in  No.  2  spot,  comes  News. 

******* 

As  a  matter  of  cold  figures.  Radio  Daily's  special  num¬ 
ber  lists  no  fewer  than  70  shows,  of  all  sorts,  built  on  news, 
available  to  broadcasters  .  .  .  More  substantial  for  the  purpose 
of  discussion,  is  the  fare  in  the  Eiges-Beville  memo,  the  former 
being  chief  of  NBC’s  Press  Department  and  the  latter  being 
director  of  research  for  that  network. 

******* 

One  of  the  first  things  the  analysis  revealed  was  that 
readership  of  radio  news  varies  considerably  between  large  and 


-  13  - 


J 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/20/47 


small  cities.  While  any  average  of  46$  of  the  men  and  of  the 
women  readers  of  newspapers  in  cities  of  1,000,000  or  more  read 
the  radio  news,  only  1 6$  of  the  men  and  25$  of  the  women  in  towns 
of  25,000  to  50,000  reported  having  read  the  radio  news. 

It  should  be  remembered  that  79  of  the  106  studies  were 
in  cities  over  100,000  (and  four  had  no  radio  listings  at  all). 
Not  many  newspapers  in  cities  of  50 ,000  or  under  have  local  radio 
columnists,  and  few  have  more  than  three  stations  to  list.  Polks 
there  can  keep  track  of  their  favorite  programs  by  habit  or 
memory. 


Phone  Calls  From  Trains  By  Radio 
(Ward  Allan  Howe  in  “New  York  Times" ) 

For  the  first  time  in  this  country,  passengers  on  mov¬ 
ing  railroad  trains  can  now  make  telephone  calls  to  and  receive 
calls  from  any  telephone  connected  with  the  Bell  System  as  well 
as  with  telephones  in  many  foreign  countries. 

The  service  was  started  last  week  on  an  experimental 
basis  by  the  Pennsylvania  and  the  Baltimore  &  Ohio  Railroad  on  the 
crack  trains  of  each  road  between  New  York  and  Washington,  the 
Pennsylvania’s  Congressional  and  the  B.  &  O.'s  Royal  Blue.  The 
Congressional  leaves  Pennsylvania  Station  here  at  4:30  P.  M.  and 
the  Royal  Blue  leaves  Jersey  City  at  9:35  A.  M. ,  daylight  time. 

The  telephone  service  is  available  in  both  directions. 

The  Pennsylvania  plans  to  extend  the  service  next 
Friday  to  include  its  Potomac  northbound  from  Washington  and  its 
Legislator  southbound  from  New  York. 

Space  has  been  set  aside  in  the  lounge  car  of  each 
train  for  the  telephoning,  part  of  the  car  having  been  re-designed 
to  afford  privacy  to  passengers  using  the  service. 


Bankers  May  Use  Television 
(Noran  E.  Kersta  in  uRadio  Age" ) 

Television  could  be  a  valuable  adjunct  in  banking 
procedure.  Obvious  applications  would  be  the  instantaneous 
transmission  of  signatures  from  the  teller's  cage  to  a  central 
identification  file  where  an  endorsement,  as  it  appeared  on  a 
screen,  could  be  compared  instantly  with  the  original.  Also,  a 
television  camera  directed  on  the  patron  could  project  the  scene 
to  a  "photograph  identification  section"  for  even  more  foolproof 
and  positive  identification. 

When  television  expands,  it  is  logical  to  prophesy  that 
the  ten-year- old  youth  of  the  next  generation  will  know  more 
about  the  world,  its  industries,  its  governments  and  its  peoples 
than  his  grandfather  knew  in  his  entire  lifetime. 


-  14  - 


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8/20/47 


TRADE  NOTES 


Joseph  L.  Egan,  president  of  the  Western  Union,  stated 
to  stockholders  last  week:  The  Federal  Communications  Commis¬ 
sion's  authorization  of  increases  in  international  cable  and 
radio  message  rates  from  the  United  States  to  Europe,  the 
British  Isles,  Central  and  South  America,  Cuba  and  Far  Eastern 
points  is  expected  to  provide  Western  Union  with  additional 
annual  revenues  of  approximately  $1,500,000. 


Public  offering  of  75,000  shares  of  United  States  Tele¬ 
vision  Manufacturing  Corp.,  $4  par  value  5  per  cent  cumulative 
convertible  preferred  stock  was  made  this  week  at  $4  per  share. 
Net  proceeds  are  to  be  used  for  general  corporate  purposes  as 
additional  working  capital. 


Barry  Gray,  WOR's  platter-and-chatter  artist,  was 
elected  chairman  of  the  National  Association  of  Disc  Jockeys  at 
its  convention  in  Chicago  last  week.  Another  W0R  disc  jockey, 
5-year-old  Robin  Morgan,  was  on  the  dais  as  Gray  presided. 


Dr.  V.  K.  Zworykin,  Vice  President  and  Technical  Con¬ 
sultant  of  RCA  Laboratories,  Princeton,  N.  J.,  left  New  York 
Saturday  aboard  the  Queen  Elizabeth  to  attend  important  engineer¬ 
ing  conferences  in  Belgium,  France  and  Italy.  Recognized  inter¬ 
nationally  as  an  authority  on  television,  Dr.  Zworykin  will 
represent  the  National  Academy  of  Sciences  at  the  Liege  (Belgium) 
Congress,  September  8. 

Dr.  Zworykin  will  address  a  conference  of  the  French 
Society  of  Electrical  Engineers  at  the  Sorbonne,  Paris,  Septem¬ 
ber  1.  As  representative  of  the  National  Academy  of  Sciences  and 
the  Institute  of  Physics,  he  will  attend  an  international  con¬ 
ference  of  radio  engineers  at  Rome  to  commemorate  the  fiftieth 
anniversary  of  the  invention  of  radio  by  Marconi. 


There  are  an  estimated  14,500  FM  sets  In  use  in  the 
Washington  area,  according  to  a  recent  survey  made  by  The  Washing¬ 
ton  Post.  Until  this  survey  was  made,  8000  plus  was  the  best 
figure  available. 


The  advertising  and  sales  promotional  plans  of  the  Home 
Radio  Division  of  Westinghouse  Electric  Corp.  will  support  the 
new  radio  ’’for  every  room  in  the  house"  program  of  the  Radio 
Manufacturers  Association.  In  connection  with  this  campaign  RMA 
is  offering  to  radio  retailers  a  new  35  mm.  Kodachrome  film 
entitled  "Let's  Get  Personal"  which  runs  for  12  minutes.  The 
film  shows  that  93$  of  American  homes  now  have  at  least  one  radio. 


-  15  - 


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The  first  employee  to  be  awarded  an  RCA  Fellowship  is 
Harry  J.  Woll,  advanced  development  engineer  at  the  Company's 
Camden  plant.  Mr.  Woll  will  devote  a  year  to  graduate  studies  at 
the  University  of  Pennsylvania,  working  toward  the  Ph.D.  degree. 
During  this  period  he  will  give  full  time  to  study  and  research. 
The  Fellowship  provides  a  contribution  by  RCA  of  $1800,  in  addi¬ 
tion  to  approximately  $600  for  tuition,  fees,  and  other  expenses. 


WPIK,  Washington,  D.  C.,  began  duplicating  its  sunrise 
to  sunset  operations  on  FM  this  week,  and  also  offers  additional 
programs  on  FM  only,  until  10  p.m.  The  FM  broadcasts  will  be  on 
98.3  megacycles. 

WCFM,  the  FM  station  to  be  built  near  the  Lincoln 
Memorial  in  Washington,  has  announced  that  its  facilities  will  be 
combined  with  those  of  the  Konsum  gasoline  station  where  station 
manager  H.  F.  Kern  now  makes  his  headquarters. 

WPIK-FM  is  Washington's  sixth  FM  station  and  WCFM  will 
probably  be  the  seventh.  This  in  addition  to  12  standard  wave 
stations  in  the  metropolitan  area. 


Colleges  Asked  To  Find  Use  for  Electronic  Surplus. -- 
Engineering  schools  throughout  the  Nation  are  being  asked  by  War 
Assets  Administration  to  figure  out  educational  uses  for  some  100 
million  dollars  worth  of  surplus  electronic  equipment  with  no 
commercial  value. 

Aiding  WAA  in  selecting  these  schools  is  Dr.  S.  S. 
Steinberg,  dean  of  the  engineering  school,  Maryland  University, 
and  head  of  the  Engineering  Colleges  Administrative  Counsel. 

Results  of  the  studies  will  be  made  available  to  all 
schools.  The  materials  found  of  value  for  educational  purposes 
will  go  to  the  Federal  Works  Agency  and  will  be  put  up  for  sale 
to  State  educational  agencies  at  5$  of  fair  value. 


Ex-Wave  Becomes  WGAY,  Washington,  D.  C. ,  Disk  Jockey 
--An  ex-Wave  has  joined  the  staff  of  radio  station  WGAY  and 
WGAY-FM,  Silver  Spring,  a  suburb  of  Washington,  D.  C.,  as  an 
early  morning  "disk- jockey. 11 

She  is  Miss  Florence  Eisen  who  is  heard  each  weekday 
morning  from  7:30  to  9  o'clock  as  "Florence  --  Girl  Disc  Jockey." 

She  came  to  Washington  from  Brooklyn  with  a  contingent 
of  Waves  during  the  war.  She  was  assigned  to  the  Navy  Department 
here  as  a  yeoman.  After  her  discharge,  she  studied  dramatics  at 
a  Washington  drama  school  and  then  went  to  work  for  WGAY  as  a 
typist. 


British  Bid  U.N.  Fight  Curbs  on  Radio  Sets.--  Great 
Britain  will  propose  to  the  United  Nations  Eoonomic  and  Social 
Council  that  the  1948  international  conference  on  freedom  of 
information  investigate  any  governmental  restrictions  against 
private  citizens'  owning  or  operating  radio  sets  of  their  own 
selection. 


-  16  - 


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Founded  in  1924 


HEINL 

NEWS 

SERVICE 

Radio  —  Television  —  FM 

—  Communications 

2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 

Washington  8,  D.  C. 

Robert  D.  Heinl,  Editor 

INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  AUGUST  27,  19^7 


Eisenhower  at  Gen.  Harbord's  Funeral;  First  Ever  Televised  .  .  1 

Pershing  Called  Gen.  Harbord  the  Best  Officer  He  Ever  Knew  .  .  2 

Armstrong  to  Demonstrate  New  FM  System  Connecting  Stations  .  .  3 

July  Radio  Set  Production  Drops;  10,000  Television  Sets.  ...  4 

G.E.’s  "Voice  of  Washington"  Begins  Third  Year;  Large  Staff.  .  5 
Gives  Hollywood  Credit  for  Factors  in  Television’s  Growth.  .  .  5 

FCC  Studies  Ship  and  Lifeboat  Emergency  Radio  Equipment.  ...  6 


ASCAP  Will  Figure  Motion  Picture  Revenue  on  New  Basis . 7 

London  Listeners  Go  To  Bed  Early . 7 


Davis,  Zenith  Patent  Counsel,  Drowned  After  Saving  Daughter.  .  7 

Mother  and  Baby  Killed  When  Radio  Falls  Into  Bath.  ......  8 

New  British  Guide  to  Broadcasting  Stations  .  8 

Father  Gets  Hero  Son’s  Amateur  Call  Letters . 8 

Paul  Spearman,  Ex-FRC  Counsel,  Mentioned  to  Succeed  Sen. Bilbo.  9 
R.C.A.  Awards  First  Research  Fellowships  .  9 

ABC  Gives  Republicans  Equal  Time  On  Political  Rally . 10 

Master  Television  Antenna  System  Begins  Distribution . 10 

Senators  Oppose  U.S.  Program  Regulation,  MBS  Poll  Reveals.  .  .10 

Gov.  Dongan  Broadcasting  Co.  Recommended  for  W0K0  Frequency.  .11 

New  York  Television  Picture  Reported  Seen  Near  Chicago  ...  .12 
Petrillo  To  Confer  With  Nets  on  FM  --  Government  Studies  Case  12 


Scissors  and  Paste . . . 13 

Trade  Notes . 15 


No.  1789 


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August  27,  19^7 


EISENHOWER  AT  GEN.  HARBORD'S  FUNERAL;  FIRST  EVER  TELEVISED 


General  of  the  Army  Dwight  D.  Eisenhower  was  among  the 
distinguished  mourners  at  the  burial  of  Lieut.  Gen.  James  G.  Har¬ 
bord,  Chief  of  Staff  to  Gen.  John  J.  Pershing  in  World  War  I,  and 
former  Chairman  of  the  Board  of  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America, 
in  Arlington  National  Cemetery,  last  Friday.  General  Harbord, 
who  commanded  the  famous  U.  S.  Marine  Brigade  near  Chateau- 
Thierry,  which  stopped  the  German  advance  on  Paris,  died  at  his 
home  in  Rye,  N.  Y.  last  Wednesday  (August  20)  at  the  age  of  8l. 

The  honorary  pallbearers  at  Arlington  were: 

Maj.  Gen.  Dennis  Nolan,  U.  S.  Army,  Ret.,  Maj.  Gen. 
William  D.  Connor,  U.  S.  Army,  Ret.,  Brig.  Gen.  David  Sarnoff, 
President  and  Chairman  of  Board,  RCA,  Maj.  Gen.  Frank  R.  McCoy, 
member  of  Far  Eastern  Commission,  and  Maj.  Gen.  Fox  Conner,  U.  S. 
Army,  Ret. 


In  addition  to  the  immediate  family,  Mrs.  Anne  Brown 
Harbord,  widow,  Lt.  Col.  Lewis  Brown,  step  child,  and  Mrs.  Anne 
Brown  Whiting,  step  child,  those  who  came  on  the  special  train 
from  New  York  for  the  Washington  services  were: 

Niles  Trammel,  President  of  National  Broadcasting  Com¬ 
pany;  Frank  M.  Folsom,  Exec.  Vice  Pres,  of  RCA  Victor  Division; 
Orrin  E.  Dunlap,  Vice  Pres,  in  charge  of  Advertising  &  Publicity, 
RCA;  Col.  T.  H.  Mitchell,  Exec.  Vice  Pres,  in  charge  of  RCA  Com¬ 
munications,  Inc.;  Joseph  V.  Heffernan,  Vice  President  &  General 
Counsel,  RCA;  Edward  F.  McGrady,  Vice  President  in  charge  of  Labor 
Relations,  RCA;  S.  M.  Robards,  Manager  of  RCA  Department  of 
Information;  Mary  Millea,  Secretary  to  Gen.  Harbord,  and  Earl 
Blakeley,  Vice  President,  Bankers*  Trust  Company. 

Prior  to  burial  in  Washington,  services  were  also  held 
for  General  Harbord  Friday  morning  at  St.  Bartholomew's  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church  in  New  York  City.  The  honorary  pallbearers  there 
in  addition  to  those  who  served  at  Arlington  were: 

Owen  D.  Young,  former  chairman  of  the  board  of  the 
General  Electric  Company;  Fred  G.  Gurley,  president  of  the  Atchi¬ 
son,  Topeka  &  Santa  Fe  Railway  Company;  Sloan  Colt,  president  of 
the  Bankers  Trust  Company;  Charles  D.  Hilles,  former  chairman  of 
the  Republican  National  Committee;  Harry  P.  Davison,  vice  chairman 
of  the  New  York  Chapter,  American  Red  Cross,  and  George  L.  Harri¬ 
son,  president  of  the  New  York  Life  Insurance  Company. 

Others  who  attended  the  service  were  Gen.  Courtney  H. 
Hodges,  commander  of  the  First  Army;  Maj.  Gen.  H.  C.  Ingles,  USA, 


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retired,  former  chief  signal  officer  of  the  Army  and  president  of 
RCA  Institutes,  Inc.,  and  Edvard  J.  Nally,  first  Pr®s^en^f0^* 
Seven  former  presidents  of  the  National  Republican  Club,  of  which 
General  Harbord  had  served  as  president,  and  a  color  guard  of 
?oSr  nurses  from  the  New  York  Chapter  of  the  Red  Cross  also  were 
present  in  recognition  of  the  General’s  World  War  II  leadership 
of  the  New  York  City  Red  Cross  Chapter. 

The  military  honors  accorded  to  General  Harbord  at 
Arlington  were  very  impressive.  It  was  probably  the  first  notable 
funerllSver  to  be  televised.  Films  made  by  the  news-reel  camera¬ 
men  of  WNBT,  NBC's  television  station  who  came  down  from  New. York 
were  later  telecast  by  other  stations  over  the  eastern  television 
network.  In  this  there  was  an  historic  parallel  when  in  1925  the 
funeral  services  of  William  Jennings  Bryan,  the  first  in  the 
United  States  to  be  heard  over  the  radio,  were  broadcast  from  the 
New  York  Avenue  Presbyterian  Church  in  Washington,  the  church 
attended  by  President  Lincoln. 

One  minute  of  silence  out  of  respect  to  General  Harbord 
was  observed  by  the  entire  radio  network  of  the  National  Broad¬ 
casting  Company  at  the  time  of  the  military  ceremony  for  t 
General  in  the  Chapel  at  Fort  Myer,  Va., 

burn al  in  Arlington.  At  the  same  time,  all  of  the  world  wide 
circuits  of  RCA  were  silenced  for  that  period.  American  flags  in 
Rockefeller  Center  and  at  all  RCA  manufacturing  plants,  .tati 
and  offices  remained  at  half  staff  until  after  the  burial. 

XXXXXXXX 

PERSHING  CALLED  GEN.  HARBORD  THE  BEST  OFFICER  HE  EVER  KNEW 

"James  Guthrie  Harbord  never  met  a  situation  he  did  not 
master.  Pershing  called  him  the  best  officer  he  ever  knew,  Jo ff re 

described  him  as  an  abler  commander  th^gonU^end°^c^r|B^  « 
always  a  good  soldier  from  the  day  in  1889  he  enlisted  as  a 
private?"  So  read  an  editorial  in  the  New  York  Times  which  con¬ 
tinued: 


"Never  in  our  history  was  there  a  more  stirring  or 
decisive  victory  than  that  at  3elleau  Wood  and  Chateau-Thierry. 

The  Germans  in  their  last  desperate  offensive  wereJ?rea^g  the 
back  of  British  and  French  resistance.  .Once  more  they  bad 
reached  the  banks  of  the  Marne,  only  thirty-seven  miles  from 
Paris.  At  this  last  moment  General  Pershing  threw  in  our  best 
available  troops.  General  Harbord  was  chosen  to  lead  them  --the 
Marines  at  Belleau  Wood,  Bouresches  and  Vaux  and  elements  of  the 
SeooM  Division  at  Chateau-Thierry.  It  was  a  Dunkerque  in  reverse 
The  Americans  fought  furiously  in  the  open. without  regard  t 
losses.  For  three  days  of  carnage  the  decision  hung  in  doubt 
until  the  Germans  started  a  foot-by-foot  retreat.  Within  t 


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weeks  we  had  them  unsheltered  in  the  valley  under  the  slaughter 
of  our  guns.  They  never  recovered  their  lost  initiative." 

****** 

"In  business  he  was  as  successful  as  he  had  been  in  the 
Army.  He  joined  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America  in  1923  and 
served  it  as  president  and  chairman  of  the  board  for  seventeen 
years  through  its  period  of  greatest  expansion.  Until  his  recent 
retirement  at  8l  he  was  an  executive  officer  in  a  dozen  business 
enterprises.  He  wrote  three  books  and  a  prodigious  number  of 
articles.  A  forceful  speaker  with  a  tart  sense  of  humor,  he 
remained  a  modest  hero  who  never  traded  on  past  glories." 

An  editorial  in  the  Washington  (D.  C.)  Star  read,  in 

part : 

"The  story  of  James  Guthrie  Harbord  deserves  expansive 
telling.  So  various  were  his  gifts  and  so  wide  was  his  employ¬ 
ment  of  them  that  a  book  of  considerable  size  would  be  required 
for  an  adequate  appraisal.  He  was  too  large,  too  strong,  too 
compelling  a  person  to  be  crowded  into  a  few  paragraphs.  Yet  it 
is  feasible  to  brief  the  man  and  his  work.  And  the  first  point 
to  be  mentioned  in  such  a  summary  is  that  he  was  self-made. 

"Born  on  a  farm  in  Illinois,  General  Harbord  was  the  son 
of  a  cavalry  trooper  and  grew  up  in  the  tradition  of  the  Army.  He 
tried  for  West  Point  and  lost  the  appointment  through  politics. 
Undismayed  by  the  disapppintment,  he  enlisted  as  a  private.  He 
was  in  Cuba  with  the  Rough  Riders,  in  the  Philippines  with 
Leonard  Wood,  in  France  with  Pershing.  The  record  of  his  Marines 
at  Belleau  Wood  proved  his  capacity  as  a  leader  in  the  field.  He 
confirmed  his  country's  appreciation  of  him  by  his  command  of  a 
full  division  in  the  drive  against  the  Germans  at  Soissons. 

"General  Harbord  was  fifty- six  when  he  entered  the 
second  important  phase  of  his  career  as  president  of  the  Radio 
Corporation  of  America.  The  new  wireless  communications  industry 
needed  men  of  his  talents  and  especially  men  of  his  character.  He 
soon  demonstrated  his  ability  to  guide  an  enterprise  for  which  the 
rules  had  to  be  made  from  day  to  day  in  response  to  immediate 
demand . " 


XXXXXXXXXX 

ARMSTRONG  TO  DEMONSTRATE  NEW  FM  SYSTEM  CONNECTING  STATIONS 

Frequency  modulation  broadcasting  has  achieved  standards 
of  engineering  excellence  and  acceptance  as  a  technical  improve¬ 
ment  in  the  art  of  radio  broadcasting  which  make  it  advisable  for 
the  National  Association  of  Broadcasters'  FM  Department  to 


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concentrate  its  efforts  in  behalf  of  FM  member  stations  into 
business  and  program  channels. 

This  policy  was  agreed  upon  unanimously  last  Monday 
(August  25)  by  members  of  NAB's  FM  Executive  Committee  in  Washing¬ 
ton,  D.  C.,  meeting  for  the  first  time  under  guidance  of  Leonard 
Asch,  VBCA,  Schenectady,  N.  Y.,  who  was  recently  appointed  to  the 
committee  chairmanship. 

The  NAB,  at  the  committee's  suggestion,  will  invite 
Major  Edwin  H.  Armstrong  to  demonstrate,  at  the  forthcoming  NAB 
convention,  his  new  relay  system  for  connecting  stations.  Time 
for  this  purpose  will  be  set  aside  one  evening  during  the  annual 
meeting  at  Atlantic  City  next  month. 

Following  up  recent  By-Law  changes  which  provide  for 
direct  representation  for  FM  stations  on  the  NAB  Board  of 
Directors,  the  FM  Committee  recommended  that  elections  for  this 
purpose  be  held  at  the  annual  NAB  convention  next  month.  FM  sta¬ 
tions  of  both  classes,  A  &  B,  television  and  facsimile  stations, 
are  entitled  under  the  new  by-laws  to  one  director-at-large  each 
whenever  there  are  25  members  from  each  category  within  the 
membership  of  NAB. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

JULY  RADIO  SET  PRODUCTION  DROPS;  10,000  TELEVISION  SETS 

A  seasonal  decline  plus  many  plant  vacation  shut-downs 
resulted  in  decreased  production  of  radio  and  television 
receivers  in  July,  the  Radio  Manufacturers  Association  said  Monday. 

July  production  of  all  types  of  radio  receivers  by  RMA 
member-companies  dropped  to  1,155,456  as  compared  to  June's  total 
of  1,213,142.  However,  a  sharp  increase  in  total  set  production 
occurred  during  the  last  week  of  July.  In  the  work  week  ending 
August  1  a  total  of  357,240  radio  receivers  were  produced  as  com¬ 
pared  with  269,530;  187, 723 ;  138,030,  and  202,933  sets  manu¬ 
factured  in  the  preceding  work  weeks. 

Television  receiver  production  in  July  of  10,007  was 
slightly  below  the  record  of  11,484  sets  produced  in  June  but  well 
above  the  total  of  any  other  month  reported  this  year.  July's 
television  receiver  output  was  classified  as  follows:  5,546  radio 
table  models,  2,591  radio  consoles,  1,862  radio  phonograph  combina¬ 
tion  consoles,  and  8  television  converters. 

FM-AM  receivers  produced  by  member -companies  in  July 
totalled  70,649,  as  follows:  14,176  table  models,  485  consoles, 
55,987  radio-phonograph  combination  consoles,  and  1  table  model 
radio-phonograph  combination.  July's  FM-AM  output  was  below  that 


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8/27/47 


of  76,624  such  sets  in  June  as  might^e  expected  vith^declin^ 

haveVprodicefmPoretSan  a‘ half -million  AM-FM  and  FM  receivers- 

the6 July  total  bringing  the  7  months'  aggregate  to  516,212. 

Total  radio  set  production  by  member- companies  for  the 
seven  months  of  19^7  through  July  was  9,766,100. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

G.E.’s  "VOICE  OF  WASHINGTON"  BEGINS  THIRD  YEAR;  LARGE  STAFF 

BroadcastingTompIny! ' Genera^Manage/ofstation  VOL  ^Washing- 

Washingtor/'  nlvfprogr^s  vhLrggin  their  third ^-aoessivejear 
under  the  sponsorship  of  the  General  Electric  uompay 

11:00  P.M. 

The  "Voice  of  Washington"  is  said  to  be  prepared  by  one 
of  the  largest  staffs  of  newspaper  and  radio  reporters  eve 
assembled  by  an  Individual  station. 

These  programs  are  delivered  by  a  voice  known  only  as 
"The  Voice  of  Rht-away°del' very^news  without  any 

c^lorSg!^Pnrnfcfions3oradSmaufeffeJts/  The  news  is  entirely 
devoid  of  editorial  opinion  or  commentary. 

The  "Voice  of  Washington"  news  programs  make  ®^®£slve 
use  of  the  GE  Wire  Recorder  to  bring  WOL  listeners  the  actual 
voices  of  the  persons  that  make  the  news. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

GIVES  HOLLYWOOD  CREDIT  FOR  FACTORS  IN  TELEVISION’S  GROWTH 

We  must  not  underestimate  "the  enterprise,  sincerity. 

Television  Engineers  in  Hollywood  last  week. 

The  speaker  was  introduced  by  Harry  Lubcke,  President 

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8/27/47 


the  photographic,  optical,  and  film  contributions  of  the  motion 
picture,  television's  development  would  have  been  spasmodic  and 
more  difficult. 

As  to  the  important  role  which  films  will  play  in  tele¬ 
vision,  Mr.  Goldsmith  mentioned  that  "It  is  estimated  that  film 
will  constitute  20  to  30$  of  all  programs,  and  that  it  will  take 
a  relatively  more  necessary  part  in  television  than  do  transcrip¬ 
tion  programs  in  present-day  radio."  Regarding  network  plans  and 
operations, Mr.  Goldsmith  stated:  "It  is  not  unreasonable  to 
assume  that  by  1950,  radio  relays  and  coaxial  cables  will  bring 
network  programs  to  the  entire  East  and  West,  and  that  television 
networks  will  thus  bind  together  the  entire  nation.  Already  over 
three  thousand  miles  of  the  New  York -Los  Angeles  link  have  been 
completed."  The  public's  tremendous  interest  was  emphasized  when 
the  speaker  mentioned  that  in  New  York  City,  alone,  "television 
is  being  exhibited  in  hundreds  of  restaurants,  and  over  1000 
taverns. " 


XXXXXXXXXX 

FCC  STUDIES  SHIP  AND  LIFEBOAT  EMERGENCY  RADIO  EQUIPMENT 

The  Communications  Commission  last  week  adopted  amend¬ 
ments  to  its  Rules  and  Regulations  for  the  purpose  of  deleting 
therefrom  provisions  with  respect  to  lifeboat  radio  installations 
which  became  obsolete  when,  at  the  conclusion  of  hostilities,  the 
U.  S.  Coast  Guard  cancelled  certain  lifeboat  radio  requirements. 
The  effect  of  this  action  is  to  permit  those  ships  which  are 
required  by  the  Safety  of  Life  at  Sea  Convention  or  by  the  Coast 
Guard  to  carry  lifeboat  radio  installations  to  have  either  one  or 
two  possible  non-portable  types  of  installations.  One  type  of 
installation  is  the  same  as  that  permitted  before  the  war.  The 
other  type  of  installation  is  one  of  the  types  of  non-portable 
installations  which  was  permitted  during  the  war  for  use  in  lieu 
of  a  portable  installation. 

The  Commission  recognises  the  importance  from  the  safety 
standpoint  of  having  adequate  radio  installations  on  board  ship. 
In  this  connection,  it  is  considered  possible  that  portable  radio 
installations  should  be  permitted  or  required  as  part  of  the 
emergency  equipment  including  the  lifeboat  radio  equipment.  The 
data  available  at  this  time  are  insufficient  to  afford  a  basis 
for  a  final  conclusion  in  this  matter  and,  therefore,  the  Commis¬ 
sion  through  its  Special  Marine  Safety  Survey  Group  and  in 
cooperation  with  other  interested  departments  and  agencies  of  the 
government  and  other  interested  persons  is  conducting  a  study  to 
determine  the  facts  and  to  ascertain  whether  recommendations 
should  be  made  regarding  any  changes  in  the  applicable  treaties, 
laws  and  regulations. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

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8/27/47 


ASCAP  WILL  FIGURE  MOTION  PICTURE  REVENUE  ON  NEW  BASIS 

The  American  Society  of  Composers,  Authors  and 
Publishers  (ASCAP)  with  the  expiration  of  current  licenses  to 
motion-picture  theatres  to  use  its  music,  will  use  a  new  method 
to  calculate  charges  for  such  use  of  music.  The  present  method 
of  scaling  the  license  prices  to  reflect  the  sizes  of  theatres 
will  be  replaced  by  a  formula  in  use  in  many  other  countries, 
relating  the  charge  for  use  of  music  to  the  scale  of  admission 
prices.  This  new  formula  will  effect  an  adjustment  of  the 
motion-picture  rates  commensurate  with  similar  adjustments  already 
effected  among  other  of  the  Society’s  licensees. 

Deems  Taylor,  President  of  ASCAP,  defined  the  new 
formula  as  simple.  "We  merely  ascertain  the  potential  income 
from  a  capacity  sale  of  the  theatre  for  a  single  performance, 
and  use  that  as  the  amount  of  the  annual  license  fee.  Since  there 
are  usually  well  over  a  thousand  performances  a  year,  it  is 
simple  mathematics  to  estimate  that  the  Society  will  receive 
about  one  one -thousandth  of  each  admission  dollar." 

XXXXXXXXXX 
LONDON  LISTENERS  GO  TO  BED  EARLY 

BBC  researchers  have  been  looking  into  the  "availabil¬ 
ity  of  listeners"  in  the  evenings  in  Britain.  "What  they  wanted 
to  know  was  the  number  of  people  normally  available  to  listen  to 
the  radio  at  certain  times  --  not  how  many  actually  do  listen  — 
and  they  unearthed  some  curious  facts"  the  BBC  Overseas  Press 
Bulletin  explains.  Among  their  discoveries,  they  observed  that 
listeners  in  the  North  and  in  Scotland  go  to  bed  considerably 
later  than  do  listeners  elsewhere  in  the  United  Kingdom.  Sur¬ 
prisingly,  listeners  around  London  go  to  bed  earlier  than  those 
in  any  other  part  of  Great  Britain  except  the  West.  Bedtimes 
tend  to  get  later  with  each  step  in  the  social  scale  and  men  tend 
to  go  to  bed  later  than  women  do.  Young  people  ( sixteen-nineteen 
years)  are  specially  likely  to  be  unable  to  listen  before  7-0 
p.m.  on  weekdays,  while  listeners  in  the  twenty- twenty-nine  age 
group  are  those  who  stay  up  latest.  Listening  figures  are  nearest 
to  saturation  point  between  6.0  and  6.30  and  furthest  from  it 
between  6. 30  and  7.30  p.m. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

DAVIS,  ZENITH  PATENT  COUNSEL,  DROWNED  AFTER  SAVING  DAUGHTER 

David  McClure  Davis,  patent  counsel  for  Zenith  Radio 
Corporation  since  1942,  and  before  that  with  General  Electric, 
was  drowned  after  he  saved  a  daughter's  life  when  their  boat 
capsized  in  Santa  Rosa  Sound  on  the  Gulf  of  Mexico,  near  Ft.  Wal¬ 
ton,  Florida. 

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Mr.  Davis  was  in  the  boat  with  his  wife,  Mary,  their 
two  daughters,  Rebecca, 8  and  Sally,  5*  his  sister  and  two  other 
persons.  The  group  was  picnicing  on  a  small  island  off  the 
coast.  When  they  got  ready  to  leave  their  motor  boat  wouldn't 
start  and  they  began  drifting.  Suddenly  the  motor  started  and 
the  prow  of  the  boat  shipped  water  and  capsized.  Each  of  the 
adults  took  a  child  and  started  swimming  for  shore.  Mr.  Davis, 
who  was  on  the  crew  at  Princeton,  had  Rebecca.  Mrs.  Davis  had 
already  reached  shore  with  Sally  and  came  back  and  took  Rebecca 
from  Davis.  When  she  reached  shore  again  and  looked  back,  Davis 
had  disappeared.  The  Davises  have  one  other  daughter,  Nancy,  2, 
who  was  not  in  the  boat  at  the  time. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

MOTHER  AND  BABY  KILLED  WHEN  RADIO  FALLS  INTO  BATH 

A  warning  not  to  have  small  portable  radios  too  near 
the  bath  tub  came  from  Salt  Lake  City  last  week  when  a  22-year- 
old  mother  and  her  l4-month-old  daughter  were  killed  when  a 
small  table  model  radio  apparently  fell  or  was  pulled  acciden¬ 
tally  into  a  bath  tub  in  which  the  two  were  bathing  last  night. 

Dr.  Clarence  R.  Openshaw,  Salt  Lake  City  physician, 
said  Mrs.  Norman  Waagen  was  electrocuted,  while  the  baby 
possibly  died  from  a  combination  of  drowning  and  electrocution. 

Dr.  Openshaw  said  he  believed  the  baby  pulled  the 
electric  cord  on  the  radio,  causing  it  to  fall  into  the  water. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

NEW  BRITISH  GUIDE  TO  BROADCASTING  STATIONS 

Details  of  an  additional  130  new  broadcasting  stations 
are  given  in  the  second  edition  of  the  British  Guide  to  Broad¬ 
casting  Stations,  published  by  Iliffe  and  Sons,  Ltd.  (is.  Od. 
net)  London.  The  compilers  have  had  the  help  of  the  BBC  Receiv¬ 
ing  Station  at  Tatsfield,  Kent,  in  checking  the  frequency  measure¬ 
ments  of  the  1,200  stations  listed  in  the  revised  edition.  The 
situation,  call- sign,  frequency,  wavelength,  and,  where  known, 
the  power  of  some  900  short-wave  stations  throughout  the  world 
are  an  outstanding  feature  --  and  one  invaluable  to  every  long¬ 
distance  listener. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

FATHER  GETS  HERO  SON'S  AMATEUR  CALL  LETTERS 

The  Federal  Communications  Commission,  to  grant  Ernest 
Me Ivey  of  Seattle,  Washington,  permission  to  change  his  amateur 
station  call  letters  from  W7HVS  to  W7HUX,  waived  its  rules  which 

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8/27/47 


require  that  amateur  calls  be  assigned  systematically  to  prevent 
partiality.  The  extenuating  circumstances  which  caused  the  Com¬ 
mission  to  make  this  exception  was  Mr.  Melvey's  desire  to  use 
the  call  letters  of  an  amateur  station  which  had  been  operated 
by  his  late  son,  Robert,  who  died  in  action  aboard  the  cruiser 
Nashville  when  that  ship  was  hit  by  a  Japanese  suicide  plane  dur¬ 
ing  the  war.  The  Commission  was  impressed  by  the  father's  wish 
to  perpetuate  his  son's  call  letters  on  the  air  "in  remembrance 
of  the  good  times"  the  two  had  together. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

PAUL  SPEARMAN,  EX-FRC  COUNSEL,  MENTIONED  TO  SUCCEED  SEN.  BILBO 

If  the  lightning  should  strike  Paul  D.  P.  Spearman  and 
he  would  be  elected  to  succeed  Senator  Theodore  Bilbo  of  Mississ¬ 
ippi,  radio  would  be  well  represented  by  a  newcomer  on  Capitol 
Hill.  Mr.  Spearman,  a  native  of  Mississippi,  was  former  chief 
counsel  of  the  old  Federal  Radio  Commission.  When  the  late  Judge 
Eugene  Sykes,  also  from  Mississippi,  former  chairman  of  the  FRC, 
retired  he  went  into  partnership  with  Mr.  Spearman.  The  latter 
is  still  an  active  practitioner  in  the  field  of  radio  and  com¬ 
munications  and  is  the  senior  partner  of  the  law  firm  of  Spearman 
and  Roberson  in  Washington. 

Leading  candidates  in  the  race  for  the  vacancy  created 
by  Senator  Bilbo's  death  are  Rep.  Wm.  M.  Colmer  of  Mississippi  and 
Paul  B.  Johnson,  Jr.,  31  year  old  Marine  veteran  of  World  War  II. 
There  is  just  a  chance  that  Rep.  John  E.  Rankin  of  Mississippi 
may  also  get  into  the  contest. 

Decision  of  Governor  Wright  of  Mississippi  to  allow  the 
seat  to  remain  vacant  until  the  State's  general  election  November 
4,  presaged  a  wide  open  race  with  anyone  able  to  get  50  names  on 
a  petition  eligible  for  the  scuffle,  and  already  more  than  a 
dozen  names  have  been  mentioned. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

R.C.A.  AWARDS  FIRST  RESEARCH  FELLOWSHIPS 

The  Fellowship  Board  of  the  National  Research  Council, 
Radio  Corporation  of  America,  last  Monday  announced  the  first 
awards  in  a  fellowship  program  to  provide  for  advanced  graduate 
study  and  research  in  electronics. 

The  awards,  providing  stipends  ranging  from  $1,600  to 
$2,100  for  a  year  of  academic  work,  plus  a  maximum  of  $600  for 
tuition  or  necessary  equipment,  have  been  made  possible  by  a  grant 
to  the  Research  Council  from  R.C.A. 


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Vinners  for  1947-1948  are  Arnold  S.  Epstein,  Leigh 
University;  Willis  W.  Harman,  the  University  of  Washington;  Arnold 
R.  Moore,  Polytechnic  Institute  of  Brooklyn;  Sol  Raboy,  Brooklyn 
College,  and  H.  Gunther  Rudenberg  of  Harvard  University. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

ABC  GIVES  REPUBLICANS  EQUAL  TIME  ON  POLITICAL  RALLY 

That  a  request  by  the  Republican  National  Committee  for 
equal  time  to  counterbalance  the  forthcoming  special  program  of 
the  Democratic  National  Committee  has  been  granted  by  the  American 
Broadcasting  Company,  was  learned  by  Jack  Gould  of  the  New  York 
Times.  The  ABC  network  is  carrying  on  a  sustaining  basis  the 
Democratic  ‘radio  rally,’  scheduled  for  10  P.M.  on  Tuesday,  Sept. 

2.  The  Republicans,  who  also  will  have  a  half  hour  at  their  dis¬ 
posal,  have  not  yet  indicated  what  type  of  program  they  will  offer. 
The  date  of  their  program  will  be  fixed  after  the  Democratic 
broadcast,  it  was  reported. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

MASTER  TELEVISION  ANTENNA  SYSTEM  BEGINS  DISTRIBUTION 

L.  Bamberger  &  Co.  of  Newark,  N.  J.  will  be  the  first 
agent  for  the  master  television  antenna  system  produced  by  Intra- 
Video  Corporation,  according  to  an  announcement  by  Alexander  Lewi, 
executive  vice  president  of  the  store's  home  furnishings  division. 

The  system  will  enable  realtors  to  install  one  antenna 
array  on  an  apartment  house  roof,  providing  unlimited  outlets  in 
the  building.  Mr.  Lewi  said  it  was  developed  by  Telicon  Labora¬ 
tories,  in  New  York  City,  and  had  been  approved  by  the  Television 
Broadcasters  Association. 

Sol  Sagall,  president  of  Intra-Video  Corporation,  pre¬ 
dicted  that  the  master  antenna  system  will  develop  into  a 
$150,000,000  industry. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

SENATORS  OPPOSE  U.  S.  PROGRAM  REGULATION,  MBS  POLL  REVEALS 

Most  of  the  U.  S.  Senators  who  will  commit  themselves 
on  the  matter,  even  privately,  are  flatly  opposed  to  government 
regulation  of  radio  programming  --  but  there  are  enough  of  those 
who  feel  otherwise  or  who  won't  say  how  they  feel  to  keep  the 
broadcasting  industry  from  lapsing  into  any  smug  attitude  toward 
its  freedom  of  the  air.  That,  at  least,  is  the  way  Paul  Sulds  of 
Mutual's  Washington  staff  sees  it  on  the  basis  of  a  confidential 
poll  he  took  of  79  Senators,  according  to  Variety. 


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Sulds,  who  revealed  last  week  that  a  majority  of 
Senators  aren't  opposed  to  "messages"  in  Hollywood  films,  dis¬ 
closed  this  week  his  tabulation  of  the  Senators'  answers  to 
another  of  his  25  questions:  "Do  you  think  the  Broadcasting  in¬ 
dustry  should  be  regulated  as  far  as  program  content  is  concerned?" 

The  solons'  answers,  which  could  be  interpreted  as  no 
less  than  mixed  viewing,  if  not  a  frown,  for  the  FCC's  Blue  Book, 
were  tallied  by  Sulds  as  follows: 

NO  -  38  (24  Republicans,  14  Democrats). 

YES  -  19  (9  Republicans,  10  Democrats). 

UNDECIDED  -  6  (3  Republicans,  3  Democrats). 

NO  COMMENT  -  15  (8  Republicans,  7  Democrats). 

The  Mutual  poll-taker  pointed  out  that  undecided  and  the 
"no  comment"  Senators,  added  to  those  answering  "yes",  totalled 
40  -  one  more  than  the  number  opposed  to  controlling  program  con¬ 
tent  . 


Those  who  answered  the  question  in  the  negative,  Sulds 
reported,  generally  took  the  stand  that  the  government  should  stay 
completely  away  from  restrictions  on  freedom  of  expression  in 
radio  or  any  other  medium.  On  the  other  hand,  those  who  wanted 
some  form  of  controls  over  program  content  were  concerned  almost 
entirely  with  news  broadcasts  and  commentators.  Oddly  enough, 

Sulds  added,  the  latter  group  included  some  of  the  most  liberal 
as  well  as  some  of  the  most  reactionary  Senators.  Almost  to  a 
man,  they  feared  slanting  of  political  news  and  comments  in  the 
opposite  direction  from  which  they  themselves  leaned. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

GOV.  DONGAN  BROADCASTING  CO.  RECOMMENDED  FOR  W0K0  FREQUENCY 

The  Communications  Commission  last  Tuesday  (Aug.  26) 
announced  adoption  of  its  Proposed  Decision  of  a  Hearing  Examiner's 
recommendation  looking  toward  granting  the  application  of  the 
Governor  Dongan  Broadcasting  Corp.  for  a  construction  permit  for 
a  new  standard  broadcast  station  at  Albany,  N.  Y.,  to  operate  with 
5  KW  power  on  1460  kc,  unlimited  time,  which  is  the  frequency  to 
be  relinquished  by  Station  W0K0  Albany  pursuant  to  the  Commission's 
denial  of  renewal  of  license  to  that  station. 

At  the  same  time  the  Commission  concurred  in  its  Exam¬ 
iner's  recommendation  proposing  to  deny  the  mutually  exclusive 
applications  of  Van  Curler  Broadcasting  Corp.  and  the  Joseph  Henry 
Broadcasting  Co.  Inc.,  for  the  same  facilities;  also  an  additional 


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application  of  the  Joseph  Henry  Broadcasting  Co.  Inc.  for  a  lic¬ 
ense  to  operate  the  present  facilities  of  WOKO. 

The  proposed  grant  would  be  conditioned  to  the  Governor 
Dongan  Broadcasting  Corp.  filing  within  60  days,  and  approval  of 
an  application  for  modification  of  a  construction  permit  incorp¬ 
orating  the  nighttime  directional  antenna  system  proposed  by  the 
Joseph  Henry  Broadcasting  Co.  and  the  selection  and  approval  of 
a  site  which  would  enable  it  to  give  complete  coverage  to  the  - 
city  of  Albany.  By  separate  order,  the  Commission  extended  for 
one  month  from  August  31  the  temporary  authority  under  which  WOKO 
is  operating. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

NEW  YORK  TELEVISION  PICTURE  REPORTED  SEEN  NEAR  CHICAGO 

Although  television  broadcasts  are  supposed  to  be 
limited  in  distance  to  the  horizon  --  somewhere  around  thirty 
miles  --  R.  E.  Nord  of  St.  Charles,  Illinois  reports  partial 
reception  of  WCBS-TV,  Columbia's  television  station  in  New  York 
City.  St.  Charles,  located  thirty  miles  west  of  Chicago,  is 
approximately  1,000  miles  from  New  York. 

"The  lines  in  your  test  pattern  were  very  sharp  and 
clear  cut  and  the  name  New  York  stood  out  like  a  printed  sign," 
commented  Nord  who  received  the  signal  on  a  30-tube  table  model. 

As  proof  of  the  pickup,  he  accurately  drew  the  WCBS-TV  test 
pattern  on  his  letter  paper. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

PETRILLO  TO  CONFER  WITH  NETS  ON  FM  --  GOVERNMENT  STUDIES  CASE 

James  C.  Petrillo,  president  of  the  American  Federation 
of  Musicians,  has  accepted  the  proposal  of  the  heads  of  the  four 
networks  for  a  further  meeting  on  the  problem  of  simultaneous 
duplication  of  network  musical  programs  on  both  frequency  modula¬ 
tion  and  standard  stations.  The  meeting  is  expected  to  be  held 
the  second  week  of  September  in  Chicago,  Jack  Gould  writes  in  the 
New  York  Times.  Last  week  Mr.  Petrillo  formally  rejected  the 
plea  of  the  four  networks  to  authorize  such  duplication. 

Meanwhile,  representatives  of  the  networks  are  scheduled 
to  meet  tomorrow  afternoon  with  officials  of  the  Department  of 
Justice  in  Washington  on  the  legal  implications  of  Mr.  Petrillo' s 
refusal  to  permit  duplication.  The  Frequency  Modulation  Associa¬ 
tion,  which  originally  took  the  FM  matter  to  the  department, 
claims  that  there  is  nothing  in  the  contract  between  the  networks 
and  the  musicians  to  prevent  duplication.  The  networks  maintain 
that  their  contracts  apply  only  to  standard  broadcast  stations. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


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SCISSORS  AND  PASTE 


Tavern  Television  Proves  Sharp  Competitor  to  Juke  Box 

^  "Variety'1 ) 

Jukebox  operators  are  beginning  to  feel  the  competition 
from  television  sets  located  in  taverns  in  the  Chicago  area.  Loss 
of  revenue  from  such  spots,  compared  to  the  takes  of  a  year  ago, 
ranges  from  10$  to  50$,  according  to  such  major  firms  in  the  juke¬ 
box  operating  field  as  the  Universal  Automatic  Machine  Co.  and  the 
ABC  Music  Service  Corp. 

(Reports  from  all  over  the  country  also  reveal 
jukebox  declines  in  taverns  as  a  result  of  tele¬ 
vision)  . 

It's  in  the  early  evening  hours  when  television  in  the 
taverns  gets  heaviest  attention.  Diskbox  have  found  that  during 
the  videocasts,  which  average  three  hours  nightly,  nickel-dropping 
is  at  its  lowest  ebb.  On  a  typical  100-box  route  collections  are 
down  from  an  average  of  $7  per  box  to  $6  and  $5,  directly 
attributable  to  tele  interference.  This  reflects  a  minimum  loss 
of  $100  a  week  to  the  distributor.  Other  ops  figure  their  losses 
are  running  as  high  as  $300  on  a  100-machine  route. 

Projecting  the  situation  nationally,  the  loss,  if  the 
$1  per  week  reduction  were  made  the  norm,  could  easily  reach 
$250,000  for  the  year,  without  taking  into  account  the  anticipated 
expansion  of  video  sets.  New  York  is  figured  to  have  a  minimum  of 
2,000  sets  in  taverns,  while  in  Los  Angeles  it’s  at  least  500.  An 
additional  500  may  be  counted  on  in  such  videocasting  areas  as 
Washington,  Philadelphia  and  St.  Louis. 


Moscow  Radio  Committee  Samples  Alka-Seltzer 

("Editor  and  Publisher") 

During  the  recent  Foreign  Ministers  Conference  in  Moscow 
broadcasts,  Russian  radio  authorities  would  gather  in  the  studio 
to  listen  to  the  feedback  programs  from  the  U.S. 

Henry  C.  Cassidy  of  the  Associated  Press  staff  in  Russia 
said  one  of  them  asked:  "What  is  this  Alka-Seltzer  we  hear  so 
much?" 

Cassidy  produced  a  bottle  of  the  stuff  and  passed  it 
around.  Each  of  the  Russians  took  a  sip,  whereupon  a  censor  asked 
Cassidy:  "Is  this  stuff  poison?" 

Assured  it  was  not,  the  censor  commented  slyly:  "You 
could  have  poisoned  the  whole  Moscow  radio  committee." 


-  13 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


8/27/47 


Radio  Audiences  O.K.  Sometimes;  Sometimes  Not 

On  a  straight  vote,  says  the  radio  critic  of  the  London 
Observer,  W.  E.  Williams,  in  the  latest  issue  of  The  BBC  Quarterly, 
the  majority  of  listeners  would  probably  favour  the  abolition  of 
the  studio  audience.  "But,"  he  goes  on,  "if  the  question  were 
broken  down  into  components,  the  decision  might  be  far  less  of  a 
foregone  conclusion." 

Mr.  Williams  analyses,  in  his  article,  a  problem  that 
has  long  provoked  professional,  as  well  as  lay,  controversy.  There 
are  programmes,  he  says,  in  which  the  audience  is  an  indispensable 
partner  —  "Have  a  Go,"  for  example;  there  are  others  --  he  cites 
Variety  productions  —  in  which  an  audience  "is  required  as  a 
catalyst,"  and  of  these  he  is  critical,  deprecating  reliance  on 
visual  stimulus  as  incompatible  with  the  nature  of  radio. 


BBC  Gets  Its  Foot  Into  It  Broadcasting  Spanish  Bullfight 

(L.  Marsland  Gander  writing  from  London  in  "New  York  Times" ) 

The  summer  doldrums  of  British  radio  have  been  enlivened 
by  a  sudden  squall  caused  by  a  bullfighting  broadcast.  Edward 
Ward,  formerly  a  BBC  war  reporter,  went  down  the  old  Spanish  trail 
at  Easter,  and,  among  the  recordings  which  he  made  on  old  Spanish 
customs,  was  a  bullfight  commentary.  Though  at  times  Ward  seemed 
carried  away  by  the  poetry  of  an  exciting  spectacle,  it  was  not  a 
particularly  callous  commentary. 

The  BBC  included  the  bullfight  record,  which  lasted 
eight  minutes,  in  a  program  lasting  an  hour  and  a  half  describing 
Easter  festivities  in  Denmark,  Greece,  Austria,  Spain  and  Italy. 
Soon  the  humanitarians  were  in  full  cry.  The  Performing  Animals 
Defence  League  sued  in  the  High  Court  for  an  injunction  to  restrain 
the  E3C  from  broadcasting  the  commentary  again.  The  motion  was 
dismissed  and  the  BBC  then  proceeded  to  rebroadcast  the  whole 
program,  this  time  on  the  sacred  and  serious  Third  program  wave 
lengths. 

This  brought  91-year-old  George  Bernard  Shaw  bounding 
into  the  arena  and  calling,  in  a  letter  to  The  Daily  Telegraph, 
for  an  inquiry  into  the  mental  condition  of  the  BBC.  In  his 
youth,  said  Shaw,  England  was  proud  of  having  abolished  bear 
baiting  and  all  such  savageries.  But  now! I 


Paul  Porter  Will  Tell  Why  It  Was  All  Greek  To  Him 

("Washington  Post") 

Paul  Porter,  ex-FCC  chairman  and  the  former  special 
Ambassador  to  Greece,  has  written  his  first  magazine  piece  about 
his  mission.  It  will  be  published  by  Collier's  September  12  and 
is  called  "Wanted  in  Greece  —  A  Miracle."  Porter  presented  the 
check  for  this  article  to  the  Americans  for  Democratic  Action. 


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He  ini  Radio  News  Service 


8/27/47 


TRADE  NOTES 


Look  published  by  Gardner  Cowles,  Jr.,  who  is  also 
president  of  the  Cowles  Broadcasting  Company,  advertises  it  has 
gained  3,000,000  readers  in  1947  over  1946,  largest  gain  among 
the  Big  Three  magazines  whose  magazine  audience  now  is:  Life , 
26,000,000  readers;  Look,  15,650,000,  and  Saturday  Evening  Post, 
13,750,000. 


The  Clear  Channel  hearing,  which  was  scheduled  to  reopen 
September  29,  at  the  FCC,  has  been  postponed  until  October  14. 


"Information  Please,"  will  become  a  weekly  half-hour 
coast-to-coast  attraction  of  the  Mutual  Broadcasting  System 
beginning  at  9:30  E.D.T.  Friday,  September  26,  when  it  is  offered 
for  the  first  time  for  sponsorship  locally  in  areas  as  the  net¬ 
work’s  newest  co-op  show. 


Offering  a  potential  circulation  of  200,000  at  little 
cost,  plus  an  opportunity  to  experiment  with  advertising  commer¬ 
cials  in  the  new  medium,  George  Moskovics,  WCBS-TV  Commercial 
Manager,  addressed  his  third  sales  letter  in  the  CBS  program 
availabilities  series  to  the  membership  of  the  Association  of 
National  Advertisers  on  the  subject  of  commercial  films.  70$  of 
the  ANA  roster,  it  is  reported,  has  such  films  for  promotion 
purposes . 


The  American  Radio  Relay  League  has  appointed  Albert  E. 
Hayes,  jr. ,  radio  amateur  of  Baltimore,  to  the  full-time  post  of 
National  Emergency  Coordinator  to  promote  and  supervise  amateur 
preparedness  to  supply  disaster  communication. 

"A  study  of  past  experiences,"  ARRL  states,  "particu¬ 
larly  in  the  recent  Texas  City  catastrophe,  has  shown  that  to  be 
prepared  for  efficient  performance  requires  not  only  a  highly- 
organized  local  planning  program  but  also  the  co-ordination  of 
existing  nation-wide  amateur  radio  networks  as  relay  routes  for 
emergency  traffic.  Organization  at  the  national  level  must 
therefore  be  tightened." 


Had  the  pilot  of  the  plane  in  which  Ambassador  Atche - 
son  crashed  enroute  from  Japan  sent  an  earlier  warning  that  he 
was  in  trouble,  radar  could  have  expedited  rescue  efforts,  an 
expert  observed. 

Naval  Capt.  Walter  S.  Mayer,  jr.,  of  Staten  Island,  N.Y., 
who  helps  direct  the  Hawaii  Air-Sea  Rescue  Center,  said,  however, 
that  the  warning  did  not  come  until  the  plane  was  30  minutes  from 
disaster. 


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With  a  two-hour  warning,  he  explained,  a  rescue  plane 
could  have  been  guided  by  radar  to  the  imperilled  plane  to  pin¬ 
point  the  crash  position  and  direct  rescue  vessels  to  the  exact 
spot. 


On  his  morning  show  over  WTOP-CBS,  Washington,  Arthur 
Godfrey  told  of  the  need  for  relief  for  the  Chinese  people 
ravaged  by  floods. 

The  next  day  Godfrey  got  a  letter  from  Congressman 
Walter  H.  Judd,  5th  District  of  Minnesota,  asking  for  the  script 
of  the  broadcast.  In  his  own  hand,  the  Congressman  added  a  P.S.: 
"As  a  result  of  your  broadcast,  a  physician  in  D.C.  has 
called  to  donate  $300  worth  of  drugs  to  China  Relief. 

It  must  have  been  good!" 


At  the  time  of  ABC’s  birth  in  January  1942  as  the  Blue 
Network  it  had  a  total  of  116  affiliates  of  which  80  were  in  the 
leading  market  areas  of  the  U.S.  At  the  close  of  1947,  ABC  will 
have  a  total  of  265  affiliates  of  which  it  says  at  least  167  will 
serve  the  nation’s  top  200  markets. 


Owners  of  portable  and  midget  "personal"  radios,  formerly 
limited  to  the  use  of  ordinary  flashlight  cells  as  "A"  batteries, 
are  now  offered  a  new-type,  sealed-in-steel  radio  "A"  battery 
especially  designed  for  use  in  smaller  sets  and  recently  placed  on 
the  market  by  the  Tube  Department  of  the  Radio  Corporation  of 
America. 


Davy  Jones'  locker  soon  may  be  opened  to  the  public  as 
a  result  of  an  underwater  television  experiment  in  Bikini  lagoon, 
the  Navy  announced  Tuesday  night  (Aug.  26). 

A  group  of  scientists  and  naval  officers  sat  on  a  deck 
of  a  surface  ship  and  watched  the  fish  swim  by  a  television  camera 
160  feet  below  the  surface  of  the  sunken  submarine  Apogon. 

Deep  sea  divers  who  recently  explored  the  sunken  craft 
reported  the  five-inch  square  deck  television  screen  approximated 
in  clarity  what  they  saw  on  the  bottom  during  underwater  searches. 

The  Navy  said  the  television  camera  was  lowered  to  the 
deck  of  the  Apogon,  a  target  ship  in  the  Bikini  atom  bomb  explosion. 
It  was  focused  from  the  vessel  floating  atop  the  lagoon. 


Listening  to  a  radio  program  is  an  important  part  of  the 
week's  work  for  half  a  million  students  in  4,000  Western  schools. 
Every  Thursday  at  10  a.m.,  school  radios  are  tuned  in  to  the 
Standard  School  Broadcast,  presented  from  San  Francisco  by  Standard 
Oil  of  California. 

Then,  back  in  their  classrooms,  the  children  relate  the 
classical  music  they  have  heard  to  their  studies.  Often  they  meet 
and  discuss  music  with  the  musicians  who  have  performed  for  them. 


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HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 

Radio  —  Television  —  FM  —  Communications 


INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  SEPTEMBER  3,  1947 


Mushroom  Stations  Worry  Broadcasters;  Casualties  Inevitable . 1 

RCA  Indianapolis  Plant  Begins  Making  Television  Sets.... . ,2 

Taylor,  CBS  V-p;  Burkland,  Mgr.  '  WTOP,  Launch  Radio  Workshop. ... 8 .. 3 
International  Detrola  More  Than  Doubles  Its  Sales . 3 

Overseas  Radio,  Cable  Rate  Increase  Inadequate,  Says  Mackay . 4 

Durr  Exit  Rumor  Again  Bobs  Up;  College  post  Mentioned . 5 

Democrats  First  Radio  Rally  Is  A  Success;  Republicans  Next. .......  5 

Ex-Rep.  Jones  Of  Ohio  To  Take  Over  At  FCC  Sept.  5 . 6 

Manufacturers  Combat  Foreign  Bans  On  Radio  Sets . 7 

Brig.  Gen.  Charles  E.  Saltzman  New  Asst.  Sec.  Of  State . a7 

Radio  And  Radar  Lead  In  Week*s  List  Of  New  Patents . 8 

U.  S.  Standards  Invents  The  Baby  Of  Them  All  -  The  Microtube . 9 

Experimental  Ship  Radar  Licenses  Good  Until  May  1948 . 9 

FM  Broadcasters  Sounded  Out  Regarding  AM  Music  Duplication . 10 

U.  S.  State  Department  Programs  On  Brazilian  Stations . 10 

World  Gathering  Here  To  Use  Nuremberg  Ra dio  Translators . 11 

Senator  Tobey's  Wife  Dies  At  New  Hampshire  Residence . . . 11 

Survey  To  Determine  Number  Of  Television  Sets  In  Capital . 12 

British  Now  Exchanging  Television  Films  With  U.  S . . . 12 

Scissors  And  Paste. . . . . . . ..13 

Trade  Notes . . . . . 15 


No.  1790 


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September  3,  1947 


MUSHROOM  STATIONS  WORRY  BROADCASTERS;  CASUALTIES  INEVITABLE 


Although  It  is  confidently  predicted  that  the  sale  of  radio 
time  this  Fall  and  Winter  will  exceed  that  of  a  year  ago,  broadcast¬ 
ers  are  apprehensive  at  the  way  stations  are  springing  up  all  over 
the  country  both  AM  (Standard)  and  FM  (Frequency  Modulation), 
particularly  the  latter.  They  are  all  competing  for  the  same  adver¬ 
tising  dollar  and  the  belief  is  that  sooner  or  later  many  of  the 
smaller  stations  will  have  to  throw  up  the  sponge. 

perhaps  as  good  a  cross-section  as  any  is  the  way  the 
broadcasting  stations  in  Washington,  D.  C.  have  multiplied.  3efore 
the  war  the  city  was  thought  to  be  well  covered  by  the  four  stand¬ 
ard  wave  network  stations  WMAL-A3C,  5,000  watts;  WRC-N5C,  5000  watts; 
W0L-M3S- Cowles,  5000  watts,  and  WT0P-C3S,  50,000  watts.  FM  at  that 
time  had  hardly  been  heard  of. 

Then  consider  the  amazing  expansion  in  Washington  today. 
Three  more  AM  stations  have  been  added  in  downtown  Washington,  all 
Independents  -  WINX,  250  watts,  operated  by  The  Washington  post  model¬ 
ed  along  the  lines  of  WQXR  the  station  of  the  Times  in  New  York  City, 
news  every  hour  on  the  hour,  classical  music,  etc.;  WQQW,  500  watts, 
daylight  time  only,  and  WWDC,  250  watts.  Then  add  to  that  six  com¬ 
paratively  new  standard  wave  stations  in  the  greater  Washington  area  - 
WPIK,  Alexandria,  Va.  ,  1000  watts,  daylight;  WARL,  Arlington,  Va. , 

1000  watts,  daylight;  WGAY ,  Silver  Spring,  Md. ,  1000  watts,  daylight; 
W3CC,  Bethesda,  250  watts  daylight;  WE  AM,  Arlington,  Va. ,  1000  watts 
daylight,  and  WOOK,  Silver  Spring,  Md.  ,  250  watts. 

Then  add  to  that  the  six  FIJI  stations  in  the  Washington 
area  WlNX-FM,  WRC-FM,  WWDC-FM,  WPIK-FM  and  WGAY-FM.  Incidentally, 
it  is  possible  to  pick  up  WINC-FM  at  Winchester,  Va. ,  ninety  miles 
away  from  Washington  just  as  many  Baltimore  stations  forty  miles  dis¬ 
tant  as  both  All  end  FM  are  clearly  heard.  However,  just  counting 
the  broadcasting  stations  in  greater  Washington,  their  number  has 
grown  from  four  before  the  war  to  ninetten  as  of  today  (13  AM  and 
6  FM  outlets).  And  this  doesn’t  take  into  consideration  that  the 
number  of  Washington  FM  stations  may  be  doubled  or  even  tripled  in 
the  near  future. 

Indicative  of  what  may  happen  to  these  stations  is  the 
fate  of  WQQW,  a  daytime  proposition  in  Washington.  No  station  ever 
started  out  with  a  bigger  fanfare  than  this  one.  Its  General  Man¬ 
ager  was  Edward  M.  Brecher,  onetime  assistant  to  J.  L.  Fly,  former 
Chairman  of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  and  one  of  the 
''Blue  Book”  framers.  It  was  to  be  the  "Blue-Book"  station  of  the 
nation  and  as  such  received  national  publicity.  It  issued  a 
"listeners’  bill  of  rights"  promising  no  more  than  four  commercials 
an  hour,  no  two  in  a  row  aid  no  more  than  one  a  minute.  Also  the 
station  was  to  feature  classical  music  the  same  as  WQXR  in  New  York 
City  but  WINXbeat  WQQW  to  it  on  this  so  the  latter  never  had  a 
corner  on  the  so-called  "good  music".  WQQW  stated  that  it  was  par- 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/3/47 


ticularly  anxious  "to  foster  better  relations  among  the  racial, 
religious  and  social  groups'1. 

So  far  so  good,  but  apparently  the  thing  didn’t  jell  for 
though  listeners’  letters  of  commendation  piled  up  and  an  American 
University  survey  showed  it  to  have  an  audience  of  49,000,  probably 
the  largest  of  any  of  the  day  timers,  word  got  around  that  after 
seven  months  of  operation  the  station  was  losing  heavily.  One 
estimate  was  that  it  was  as  high  as  $181,000  in  the  red;  another 
that  the  deficit  was  $150,000.  There  was  a  stockholders'  meeting 
August  18th  which  adjourned  for  a  further  session  early  this  month. 
The  object  of  the  meeting  was  said  to  have  been  to  6 ell  the  station 
Immediately  but  according  to  a  current  report  there  were  no  takers 
which  if  true  was  a  thing  which  never  happened  before  to  a  radio 
station  in  this  part  of  the  country. 

Another  significant  thing  which  might  indicate  to  the  FCC 
which  deals  out  the  licenses  so  freely  that  the  saturation  point 
has  almost  been  reached  was  last  week  when  WEIX,  a  1  KW  daytime  out¬ 
let  in  Home,  Ga. ,  requested  the  FCC  to  cancel  its  permit.  This  was 
the  first  postwar  license  turned  in.  WBIX,  one  of  four  stations  in 
Rome,  quit  after  six  months  on  the  air. 

It  was  learned  that  about  SO  construction  permits  have 
been  forfeited  recently.  Yet  the  applications  are  still  coming  in 
at  the  FCC  at  a  rate  of  45  to  50  a  month,  which  is  about  the  same  as 
last  year  at  this  time.  Leaving  out  FM  applications,  150  daytime 
applications  are  held  up  at  present  awaiting  the  outcome  of  the 
clear  channel  hearings.  There  is  a  possibility  of  the  FCC  letting 
down  the  bars  an  d  permitting  some  daytime  stations  within  750  miles 
of  the  clear  channel  operators.  No  decision  will  be  reached  on  this 
at  least  until  after  October  1st  or  whenever  the  clear  channel  heai>- 
ings  will  be  held. 

Many  of  the  pending  applications  are  believed  to  be 
flash-in~the-pan  propositions,  therefore,  as  someone  put  it,  the 
"gold  rush"  for  radio  station  licenses  seems  to  be  about  over. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

RCA  INDIANAPOLIS  PLANT  BEGINS  MAKING-  TELEVISION  SETS 

The  manufacture  of  television  receivers  at  the  RCA  Victor 
plant  in  Indianapolis  began  last  week.  Television  set  production 
at  the  Indianapolis  plant  will  supplement  existing  set  manufacturing 
at  the  RCA  Victor  Camden,  N.J.  plant. 

Installation  of  the  television  manufacturing  operation 
followed  the  recent  completion  of  the  Home  Instrument’s  factory 
modernization  program  at  Indianapolis,  the  result  of  which  is  said 
to  be  the  largest,  single  plant  employing  modern  manufacturing  meth¬ 
ods  devoted  solely  to  producing  console  radio-phonographs.  About 
$750,000  was  spent  in  setting  up  the  new  section  and  on  television 
production  facilities. 


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First  to  go  into  operation  was  the  chassis  assembly  line. 
Additional  chassis  lines  and  final  assembly  lines  will  be  added 
this  week.  The  first  television  console  instruments  are  expected 
to  be  completed  by  mid- September. 

The  Indianapolis  plant  is  one  of  three  RCA  Victor  Home 
Instrument  plants  in  Indiana.  Others  are  located  in  Bloomington, 
where  table  model  radios  and  Victrola  radio-phonographs  are  manu¬ 
factured,  and  in  Monticello,  a  cabinet  factory. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

TAYLOR,  CBS  V-P;  3URKLAND,  MGR.  WTOP ,  LAUNCH  RADIO  WORKSHOP 

Davidson  Taylor,  Vice-President  of  the  Columbia  Broadcast¬ 
ing  System,  addressed  more  than  200  school  teachers,  students,  and 
club  leaders  yesterday  (Tuesday,  Sept.  2)  as  the  third  annual  WTOP- 
CBS  Radio  Workshop  got  under  way  at  Wilson  Teachers  College  in 
Washington,  D.  C. 

Other  speakers  were  Carl  J.  Burkland,  General  Manager  of 
W TOP— CBS;  Hr.  Hobart  M.  Coming,  Superintendent  of  Washington  public 
Schools;  Dr.  Clyde  M.  Huber,  Chairman  of  the  Radio  Committee  of 
the  D. C.  Schools;  and  Mrs.  Hazel  Kenyon  Markel,  WT0P-C3S  Director 
of  Education  and  Director  of  the  Radio  Workshop. 

Sponsored  by  the  D.  C.  Public  Schools,  WTOP,  and  CBS,  the 
Workshop  offers  college  credit  for  the  two-week  session.  Courses 
include  script  writing,  production,  classroom  use  of  radio,  lectures 
by  authorities  in  government,  education,  and  radio,  and  observation 
of  actual  rehearsals  and  airing  of  shows. 

Extra-curricular  sessions  are  scheduled  at  the  WT0P-C3S 
studios  for  voice  recording  and  analysis,  and  observation  of  live 
network  and  local  shows. 

XXXXXXXXXX  XX 

INTERNATIONAL  DETROLA  MORE  THAN  DOUBLES  ITS  SALES 

Consolidated  sales  of  $53,028,515.31  for  the  nine  months 
ended  July  31  by  International  Detrola  Corporation  of  Detroit  and 
subsidiaries  were  reported  last  week  ty  C.  Russell  Feldmann,  Presi¬ 
dent  and  Board  Chairman. 

nThese  sales,  which  are  more  than  double  the  1946  figure 
of  $25,790,435.91  for  the  same  period,  reflect  principally  the  addi¬ 
tion  of  our  steel  and  coal  operations  and  also  the  completed  acquisi¬ 
tion  of  Universal  Cooler  Company  of  Canada.,  formerly  a  partly  owned 
subsidiary”,  Mr.  Feldmann  said.  Most  of  the  gain  is  in  steelmaking, 
he  indicated. 

”Steel  sales  now  represent  about  32  per  cent  of  Detrola1  s 
entire  business,  which  embraces  manufacturing  divisions  in  refriger¬ 
ation  and  air  conditioning,  home  aid  automobile  radios,  phonographs. 


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special  machinery,  aircraft  power  plants  and  sub- assemblies  and 
other  products,  Mr*  Feldmann  disclosed. 

The  corporation  had  total  sales  of  $40,810,028.22  for  all 
of  fiscal  1946,  and  net  profit  of  $1, 01  £>,123.  92. 

XXXXXXXX 

OVERSEAS  RADIO,  CABLE  RATE  INCREASE  INADEQUATE,  SAYS  MACKAY 


Mackay  Radio  &  Telegraph  Company,  All  America  Cables  and 
Radio  and  Commercial  Cables  Company  have  requested  the  Federal  Com¬ 
munications  Commission  to  revise  upwards  its  recent  order  of  an 
increase  in  overseas  radio  and  cabLe  rates.  A  petition  presented 
by  James  A.  Kennedy,  General  Attorney,  states  the  rates  authorized 
by  the  Commission^  report  "will  not  provide  adequate  revenue  to 
maintain  either  the  individual  carriers  or  the  United  States  inter¬ 
national  telegraph  industry  collectively  on  a  sound  and  stable  fin¬ 
ancial  basis.  The  Report  shows  that  of  the  nine  major  carriers  in 
the  field,  four  (which,  in  the  first  six  months  of  1946,  handled 
more  than  28 $  of  the  international  telegraph  words)  will  be  operat¬ 
ing  with  substantial  deficits  under  the  new  rates. 

"The  Report  recognizes  a  total  investment  in  the  industry 
approximating  $72,000,000,  yet  permits  outbound  rate  increases  which 
allow  an  estimated  net  revenue  for  the  industry  as  a  whole  of  only 
$1,560,000  or  approximately  2.2$  return  on  investment  before  Federal 
income  taxes.  Even  in  the  event  the  highly  nebulous  inbound  rate 
increases  suggested  by  the  Report  can  be  fully  effected,  the  return 
on  investment  would  still  be  only  3.6$  before  taxes.  At  the  hearing 
in  tnis  matter,  the  carriers  generally  supported  the  soundness  of  a 
10$  rate  of  return  after  taxes  in  view  of  the  inherent  risks  to  which 
the  industry  is  subject,  and  the  Commission  witness  on  this  point 
indicated  that,  in  his  opinion,  a  return  of  6$  would  not  be  unreas¬ 
onably  high. " 

"Since  the  record  in  this  proceeding  was  closed,  the  peti¬ 
tioners  have  been  faced  with  increased  labor  costs,  of  which  the 
Commission  has  been  informed  and  to  which  reference  is  made  in  the 
Concurring  Opinion.  The  wage  increases  payable  by  The  Commercial 
Cable  Company  will  approximate  $130,000  and  will  increase  its  esti¬ 
mated  loss  under  the  new  outbound sates  from  $665*000  to  $795,000. 

The  wage  increases  payable  by  Mackay  Radio  and  Telegraph  Company 
will  approximate  $330,000  and  will  increase  its  estimated  net  loss 
under  the  new  outbound  rates  from  $307,000  to  $637,000.  The  wage 
increases  payable  by  All  America  Cables  and  Radio,  Inc.  (in  the 
United  States)  will  approximate  $140,000  and  will  reduce  its  estim¬ 
ated  net  revenue  under  the  new  outbound  rates  from  $978,000  to 
$838,000.  in  addition,  we  wish  now  to  advise  the  Commission  that 
wage  increases  which  have  been  negotiated  at  Latin  American  points 
since  the  hearing  will  result  in  increased  operating  costs  to  All 
America  in  an  amount  in  excess  of  $100,000  without  considering  those 
negotiations  still  in  progress  involving  substantial  amounts.  Thus, 
the  estimated  net  operating  revenue  to  that  carrier  will  be  reduced 
further  to  an  amount  less  than  $738,000. " 

XXXXXXXXXX  -  4  - 


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DURR  EXIT  RUMOR  AGAIN  303S  UP;  COLLEGE  POST  MENTIONED 


The  reported  resignation  of  Commissioner  Clifford  J.  Durr 
of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  has  again  come  to  the  fore. 
It  tends  to  confirm  a  previous  report  that  Mr.  Durr,  fearing  he 
may  not  be  reappointed  when  his  term  expires  next  June,  and  if  re¬ 
appointed  may  not  be  confirmed,  has  his  eye  on  a  college  faculty 
position.  Mentioned  as  possibilities  are  the  presidency  of  the 
University  of  Alabama,  of  which  Mr.  Durr  is  a  graduate,  and  a  law 
professorship  at  Yale, 

There  have  been  rumors  that  Chairman  Charles  R.  Denny  and 
Commissioner  E.  K.  Jett  would  resign  -  reason  given  high  cost  of 
living.  Chairman  Denny  has  been  spoken  of  as  successor  to 
Judge  A.  L.  Ashby,  Chief  Counsel  of  the  National  Broadcasting  Com¬ 
pany,  and  Mr,  Jett  as  a  member  of  the  proposed  new  International 
Frequency  Commission. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

DEMOCRATS  FIRST  RADIO  RALLY  IS  A  SUCCESS;  REPUBLICANS  NEXT 

The  first  broadcast  political  rally  of  the  Democratic 
party  through  the  facilities  of  the  American  Broadcasting  Company 
last  Tuesday  night  was  acclaimed  by  party  leaders  as  a  big  success. 
Mark  Woods,  president  of  ABC,  said  that  equal  opportunity  to  be  heard 
would  be  given  to  the  Republicans  at  an  early  date. 

Gael  Sullivan,  Executive  Director  of  the  Democratic  Nation¬ 
al  Committee,  conducted  the  unusual  political  meeting  from  Washing¬ 
ton,  picking  up  Democratic  speakers  from  six  States. 

Jumping  the  gun  on  the  1943  election,  still  a  full  year 
away,  Sullivan  appealed  for  "doorbell  ringing"  and  hard  work  in  the 
precinct  to  turn  out  the  QO  million  voters  who  stayed  home  last 
election  day. 

Speaker  after  speaker  blamed  the  Republican- controlled 
Eightieth  Congress  for  inaction  on  vital  domestic  issues  and  pre¬ 
dicted  return  of  president  Truman  and  aDemocratic  Congress  in  1948. 
Speeches  by  Sullivan,  Mayor  William  O’ Dwyer  of  New  York,  Representa¬ 
tive  Helen  Gahagan  Dougless  of  California,  Mayor  Hubert  Humphrey  of 
Minneapolis,  President  Marshall  Hanley  of  the  Young  Democratic  Clubs 
of  Indiana,  Senator  Francis  J.  Myers  of  Pennsylvania  ad  Senator 
Brian  McMahon  of  Connecticut  were  piped  into  local  Democratic  rallies 
from  coast  to  coast. 


XXXXXXXX 

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EX-PEP.  JONES  OF  OHIO  TO  TAKE  OVER  AT  FCC  SEPT.  5 


Former  Representative  Robert  F.  Jones  ( R) ,  of  Ohio,  will 
assume  his  new  office  next  Friday,  September  5th,  as  Federal  Com¬ 
munications  Commission  to  succeed  Ray  C.  Wakefield  of  California, 
whose  renomination  for  a  seven  year  term  was  withdrawn  by  President 
Truman,  Supreme  Court  Justice  Harold  3urton,  of  Ohio,  will  admin¬ 
ister  the  oath  to  Mr.  Jones  and  the  ceremonies  will  take  place  in 
the  FCC,  Room  6121  at  10  A.  M,  Mr.  Jones,  who  is  40  years  old,  will 
be  the  youngest  member  the  Commission  has,  with  the  exception  of 
Chairman  Denny,  who  is  only  35.  He  was  endorsed  by  both  Senators 
Taft  and  Bricker  of  Ohio. 

In  the  meantime  tributes  from  Mr.  Jones'  former  colleagues 
in  Congress  continue  to  come  in.  Said  Rep.  Walt  Horan  of  Ohio: 

"'That  fellow,  Bob  Jones  -  I  sure  wish  he  was  on  our  team.’  • 

"That  statement  came  from  Mr.  Charles  E.  Cone,  of  Ephrata, 
Wash.,  and  the  official  Columbia  Basin  Commission  of  the  State  of 
Washington,  It  came  after  the  firstpassage  through  the  House  of  the 
Interior  Appropriations  bill. 

"It  was  an  outright  compliment  from  one  who  believes  in 
sound  western  development.  It  was  acompliment  from  a  man  who  did 
not  agree  with  the  cuts  which  had  been  made  in  the  President's  bud¬ 
get  for  western  development  in  general  and  the  Columbia  Basin  pro¬ 
ject  in  particular.  It  was  acompliment  to  the  legislative  crafts¬ 
manship  of  the  Honorable  Robert  Jones  of  Ohio. " 

This  tribute  came  from  Representative  Robert  A.  Grant  of 

Indiana: 


"I  would  not  let  this  opportunity  pass  without  adding  my 
words  of  affection,  admiration,  and  respect  for  our  colleague,  Bob 
Jones,  There  is  now  much  new  that  can  be  added  save  to  say  that 
Congress  is  losing  one  of  its  most  able  Members,  and  in  the  well- 
chosen  words  of  our  minority  leader,  the  Federal  Communications  Com¬ 
mission  will  receive  amost  valued  member. 

"I,  too,  came  to  Congress  along  with  Bob  Jones,  and  during 
these  9  years  that  we  have  served  together  I  have  learned  so  well 
to  know  those  sterling  qualities  of  Bob  Jones  that  have  endeared  him 
to  all  of  us  who  have  served  here.  " 

Representative  John  C.  Kunkel  of  Pennsylvania  spoke  in 
the  same  vein: 

"Bob  Jones  came  to  the  Seventy-sixth  Congress  as  a  new 
Member  at  the  same  time  I  did.  Since  then  he  has  been  one  of  my 
closest  and  best  friends.  I  liked  and  admired  him  from  the  first. 
Through  the  years  that  feeling  has  steadily  grown.  I  have  always 
respected  his  sincerity,  his  integrity,  and  particularly  his 

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ability.  I  have  never  seen  or  heard  anyone  handle  an  appropriation 
bill  on  the  floor  of  the  House  of  Representatives  with  more  judg¬ 
ment,  clarity,  finesse,  and  ability  than  that  exercised  by  Robert  F. 
Jones,  of  Ohio.  His  departure  from  our  midst  is  a  real  loss  to  the 
Congress  and  the  people.  I  am  glad  his  services  will  be  continued 
in  Government.  Bob,  here’s  wishing  you  happiness  and  success  in  your 
new  career.  n 


XXXXXXXXXXXX 

MANUFACTURERS  COMBAT  FOREIGN  BANS  ON  RADIO  SETS 

Industry  action  to  oppose  recent  restrictions  by  several 
Latin  American  countries  on  importation  of  receiving  sets  is  being 
taken  by  the  Radio  Manufacturers’  Association  Export  Committee.  Nine 
countries,  headed  by  Mexico,  Argentina,  and  Chile,  have  restricted 
American  set  imports,  largely  because  of  U.  S,  dollar  shortages. 

'’Bootlegging11  of  radio  sets  across  the  border  into  Mexico 
is  a  probable  result  of  the  Mexican  prohibition,  according  to  the 
RMA  Export  Committee.  No  saving  in  dollar  exchange,  higher  radio 
costs  to  the  Latin  American  public,  loss  of  foreign  governments' 
revenue  from  duties  and  no  local  labor  increase  are  other  probabi¬ 
lities,  according  to  the  RMA  Export  Committee. 

Aroused  by  the  Latin  American  restrictions,  a  special  meet¬ 
ing  of  the  RMA  Export  Committee  was  held  in  Chicago,  with  Chairman 
James  E.  3urke  presiding.  Steps  were  taken  to  combat  the  Latin 
American  bans  against  American  radio.  Action  with  the  several  Latin 
American  governments  through  local  distributors  and  other  repre¬ 
sentatives  of  American  manufacturers  is  planned,  together  with 
assistance  from  the  State  and  Commerce  Departments. 

Procedure  in  defense  of  the  .American  industry's  export 
interests  in  Latin  America  will  be  further  considered  at  another 
meeting  of  the  RMA  Exoort  Committee  on  September  15th  in  New  York 
City. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

BRIG.  GEN.  CHARLES  E.  SALT ZM AN  NEW  ASST.  SEC.  OF  STATE 

Charles  E.  Saltzman,  son  of  former  Federal  Radio  Commission 
Chairman  Gen.  Charles  McK.  Saltzman,  was  sworn  in  Tuesday  as  Assist¬ 
ant  Secretary  of  State  in  charge  of  occupation  policies. 

Mr.  Saltzman,  43  years  old,  a  former  Vice  President  and 
Secretary  of  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange,  served  with  the  Army  from 
1925  to  1930  and  rejoined  in  1942,  when  he  went  overseas  on  the  staff 
of  Gen.  Mark  Clark.  He  was  appointed  Brigadier  General  in  1945, 
and  accompanied  General  Clark  to  Vienna,  to  direct  public  administra¬ 
tion  in  the  American  zone  of  Austria. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

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RADIO  AND  RADAR  LEAD  IN  WEEK'S  LIST  OF  NEW  PATENTS 


patents  were  granted  last  week  for  new  radio  and  radar 
devices  for  aircraft  landing  systems,  armed  services  and  other  uses. 

To  guictethe  landing  of  aircraft  under  conditions  in  which 
normal  vision  is  inadequate,  John  W.  Downie  of  Schenectady,  N.Y. , 
patented  (No.  2,426,440)  and  assigned  to  the  General  Electric  Com¬ 
pany,  a  radio  apparatus,  substantially  unaffected  by  signal  strength, 
for  producing  on  the  pilot's  cathode  ray  receiving  screen  a  per¬ 
spective  representation  of  the  runway  in  which  the  proper  approach 
and  glide  angle  are  indicated  by  luminous  spots  beamed  from  speed 
beacons  along  the  landing  strip. 

These  indications,  by  a  combination  of  control  means,  cor¬ 
respond  exactly,  it  is  said,  with  the  view  of  the  landing  strip 
which  the  pilot  would  have  were  it  possible  for  him  to  view  it 
through  a  window  when  approaching  the  runway. 

Having  in  mind  the  preference  of  pilots  for  personal  look¬ 
out  observations;  their  tendency,  even  under  conditions  of  zero 
visibility,  to  look  away  momentarily  from  the  instrument  panel,  and 
the  added  strain  upon  them  of  such  dual  watchfulness,  Edmond  M. 
Deloraine  and  Gerard  J.  Lahmann  of  New  York  City,  developed  and 
patented  a  radio  guiding  system  in  which  the  simulated  pattern  pro¬ 
duced  coincides  with  direct  visual  observation. 

Their  invention  (No.  2,426,134)  assigned  to  the  Federal 
Telephone  and  Radio  Corporation  of  New  York  City,  includes  in  com¬ 
bination  a  semi-transparent  viewing  screen,  substantially  within  the 
normal  field  of  vision  of  the  pilot  when  watching  the  terrain,  and 
means  for  reproducing  upon  it  the  simulated  indications  of  the  land¬ 
ing  lights  and  pattern  of  the  airport  so  the  craft  may  be  guided  to 
a  safe  landing. 

A  reflected  wave  direction  finder,  designed  for  the  detec¬ 
tion  of  aircraft  by  electromagnetic  waves,  combined  with  apparatus 
for  controlling  gunfire,  was  patented  (No.  2,426,133)  by  Mr. 

Deloraine  and  Emile  Labin  of  New  York  City  and  Henri  G.  Busignies  of 
Forest  Hills,  N.Y.,  ?ho  assigned  their  rights  to  the  International 
Standard  Electric  Corporation  of  New  York  City. 

To  Oscar  E.  De  Lange  of  East  Orange,  N.J.,  assignor  to 
the  3ell  Telephone  Laboratories  of  New  York  City,  was  issued 
No.  2,426,182,  for  an  improved  time  division  radar  ranging  system, 
for  use  in  target  location  and  gun  direction,  by  means  of  which 
shall  splashes  and  shell  bursts  may  be  located  with  observations  of 
the  target's  range  and  direction. 

A  radio  detection  system  (No.  2,426,201),  a  drop  channel 
pulse  multiplex  system  (No.  2,426,202),  a  radio  bean  controlled 
indicating  instrument  (No.  2,426,203)  and  a  translator  circuit 
(No.  2,426,204)  for  producing  an  indication  in  accordance  with 


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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/3/4? 


variations  in  time  displacement  of  successive  pulses  of  a  pulse 
train  were  patented  by  Donald  D.  Grieg  of  Forest  Hills,  N.Y.  All 
were  assigned  to  the  Federal  Telephone  and  Radio  Corporation,  Mr, 
Grieg  and  Arnold  M.  Levine  of  Forest  Hills  got  Patent  2,426,205 
on  a  pulse  selecting  circuit  for  multiplex  systems  and  assigned  it  to 
the  Federal  Telecommunication  Laboratories  of  New  York  City, 

xxxxxxxxxx 

U.S,  STANDARDS  INVENTS  THE  BABY  OF  THEM  ALL  -  THE  MICROTUBE 

The  Control  Radio  Laboratory  of  the  National  Bureau  of 
Standards  of  which  Dr,  J.  H.  Dellinger  is  the  head,  has  developed 
a  radio  tube  about  the  size  of  an  eraser  on  a  lead  pencil.  The 
Laboratory  believes  the  tube  is  the  smallest  ever  made  and  they  have 
called  the  invention  the  micro tube. 

But  while  the  Bureau  of  Standards  is  happy  to  report  the 
invention,  they  are  very  reticent  about  uses  for  the  micro tube. 

They  explained  that  it  has  various  military  applications,  however. 

It  is  believed  the  tube  was  developed  as  the  result  of  work  in  con¬ 
nection  with  research  on  proximity  fuses,  a  military  development  of 
World  War  II. 

A  proximity  fuse,  Laboratory  officials  explained,  is  in 
effect  a  radio  set  small  enough  to  go  in  the  nose  of  a  shell.  It 
has  the  effect  of  radar  control  of  the  missile.  When  the  shell  is 
near  a  metal  object,  such  as  an  airplane,  it  will  explode  even 
though  it  has  not  made  direct  contact, 

XXXXXXXXXX 

EXPERIMENTAL  SHIP  RADAR  LICENSES  GOOD  UNTIL  MAY  1948 

The  Federal  Communications  Commission  has  extended  to 
May  1,  1948  the  license  tern  of  all  experimental  Class  2  radar  sta¬ 
tions  installed  aboard  ship  which  normally  would  expire  November  1, 
1947. 


There  is  now  pending  a  proposal  by  the  Commission  for  the 
adoption  of  rules  governing  the  licensing  of  ship-board  radar  sta¬ 
tions  on  a  regular  basis.  If  such  rules  are  adopted,  it  will  be 
necessary  for  eligible  experimental  licensees  to  apply  for  author¬ 
ity  to  operate  in  such  a  service,  and  the  extension  which  has  just 
been  granted  by  the  Commission  will  serve  to  avoid  a  duplication 
of  work  involved  in  the  submission  and  processing  of  applications 
for  renewals  as  well  as  new  licenses. 

In  the  event  a  licensee  does  not  intend  to  operate  his 
station  beyond  November  1,  1947,  the  license  should  be  submitted  to 
the  Commission  for  cancellation  at  the  time  the  operation  is  dis¬ 
continued. 


XXXXXXXX 


-  9 


X 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/3/47 


FM  BROADCASTERS  SOUNDED  OUT  REGARDING  AM  MUSIC  DUPLICATION 


Opinions  of  more  than  1,000  FM  broadcasters  on  the  dupli¬ 
cation  of  network  musical  programs  on  FM  stations  ere  being  sought 
by  the  FM  Association. 

In  a  letter  to  FM  operators,  those  holding  Federal  Com¬ 
munications  Commission  grants,  and  to  applicants,  J.  N.  Bailey, 
Executive  Director,  said: 

"Many  opinions  have  been  expressed  on  the  question  of  dup¬ 
licating  network  prograjns  on  EM  and  on  the  simultaneous  broadcast  of 
certain  programs  over  FM  and  AM,  but  have  you  -  the  broadcaster  - 
expressed  your  views?”  Results  of  the  survey  will  be  used  by  the 
FMA  in  an  overall  study  and  analysis  of  the  FM-AM  music  situation, 

Mr.  Bailey  said. 

"I  have  discussed  the  situation  with  scores  of  our  mem¬ 
bers”,  said  the  FMA  executive,  "and  I  find  the  independent  operators 
as  well  as  network  affiliates  eager  to  see  popular  network  musical 
programs  carried  on  FM,  We  are  going  beyond  our  membership  and  ask¬ 
ing  all  FM  broadcasters  to  give  us  their  views. 

Everett  L.  Dillard,  Vice-president  of  the  FMA  and  presi¬ 
dent  of  Commercial  Radio  Equipment  Co.,  operator  of  independent  FM 
stations  WASH,  Washington,  D.  C. ,  and  KOZY,  Kansas  City,  Mo.,  express¬ 
ed  the  view  that  FM  will  largely  be  developed  as  a  commercial  ser¬ 
vice  by  FM  networks  and  independent  stations  without  AM  network 
affiliations. 


XXXXXXXX 

U.S.  STATE  DEPARTMENT  PROGRAMS  ON  BRAZILIAN  STATIONS 

Two  special  radio  series  on  the  United  States  are  now  be¬ 
ing  broadcast  over  networks  of  Brazilian  stations,  the  State  Depart¬ 
ment  reports.  Information  and  cultural  officers  attached  to  the 
United  States  Embassy  at  Rio  de  Janeiro,  Brazil,  are  writing  the 
scripts  for  the  two  programs. 

The  first  is  a  10-minute  series,  broadcast  five  days  a 
week,  and  deals  with  scientific,  cultural  and  educational  develop¬ 
ments  in  the  United  States.  It  is  being  used  by  Rio  stations  and  14 
others  in  Southern  Brazil.  The  second  is  a  thrice-weekly  UU.  S. 
Commentary"  series,  reporting  views  expressed  on  current  affairs 
by  editors,  columnists,  radio  commentators  and  others  in  this  country. 
Rio  stations  and  five  others  in  Southern  Brazil  are  using  it. 

Scripts  in  both  series  are  based  on  materials  sent  regu¬ 
larly  by  wireless,  cable  and  the  mails  to  the  Embassy  -  and  to  many 
other  points  abroad  -  by  the  Office  of  International  Information 
and  Cultural  Affairs  of  the  State  Department  in  Washington.  These 
materials  include  official  speech  and  press  release  texts; 


10  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/3/47 


exoerpts  from  editorials  and  columns  in  U.  S.  newspapers  and  from 
radio  commentator  scripts;  special  articles  and  "round-ups n  on 
developments  in  the  U.  S.  in  science,  medicine,  literature,  art, 
economics,  etc. ;  magazine  article  reprints,  and  related  background 
and  documentary  informational  matter. 

X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X 

WORLD  GATHERING  HERE  TO  USE  NUREMBERG  RADIO  TRANSLATORS 

Much  has  been  said  and  written  about  the  radio  translat¬ 
ors  used  at  the  Nuremberg  trials  whereby  the  proceedings  can  be 
heard  simultaneously  in  different  languages  without  everyone  having 
to  wait  while  translations  were  being  made.  This  will  add  interest 
to  the  first  tryout  of  the  system  in  the  United  States  when  it  will 
be  used  at  the  International  Statistical  Conferences  which  will 
begin  in  Washington  next  Saturday  (September  6th). 

Delegates  will  be  equipped  with  miniature  radio  receiving 
sets  and  by  turning  a  button  on  the  headphones  will  be  able  to 
select  English,  French  or  Spanish  translations  of  the  proceedings. 

Interpreters  working  on  thirty-minute  shifts  will  broad¬ 
cast  from  booths.  The  use  of  radio  eliminates  the  necessity  for 
wires  or  cables  between  the  translation  booths  and  receiving  phones. 

The  method  cuts  the  normal  time  for  translation  by  50 
per  cent  and  gives  a  full  translation  of  every  word  that  is  spoken 
instead  of  merely  a  summary. 

While  only  three  languages  will  be  used  at  the  conferences 
here,  the  United  Nations  now  has  facilities  for  simultaneous  trans¬ 
lation  in  Russian,  Chinese  and  German  as  well. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

SENATOR  TOBEY* S  WIFE  DIES  AT  NEW  HAMPSHIRE  RESIDENCE 


Mrs.  Francelia  Lovett  To bey,  wife  of  United  States  Senator 
Charles  W.  Tobey  (R),  of  New  Hampshire),  died  this  week  at  their 
home  in  Temple,  N.  H. ,  and  their  four  children  were  at  her  bedside. 

In  addition  to  her  husband,  Mrs.  Tobey  leaves  two  sons, 
Russell  w.  Tobey,  State  recreation  director,  and  Attorney  Charles  W. 
Tobey,  Jr.,  both  of  Concord,  and  two  daughters,  Mrs.  Louise  Dean  of 
Temple  and  Mrs.  Francelia  Munson  of  Rochester,  N.  H. 

Senator  and  Mrs.  Tobey  were  married  June  4,  1902, 

XXXXXXXXXX 


-  11  - 


•'  A  ,  L 


/ 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/3/47 


SURVEY  TO  DETERMINE  NUMBER  OF  TELEVISION  SETS  IN  CAPITAL 


Many  guesses  have  been  made  as  to  the  actual  number  of 
television  sets  now  in  use  in  Washington,  D.  C.  Definite  knowledge 
is  expected  to  be  obtained  from  a  survey  now  being  made  by  WN3W, 

NBC's  television  station  in  the  Capital  which  has  sent  out  the  fol¬ 
lowing  card  which  reads  as  follows: 

nIt  will  be  very  helpful  to  us  if  we  can  have  additional 
information  about  the  number  and  location  of  television  sets  in  the 
area  served  by  WNBW.  Would  you  please  fill  out  this  card  and  drop 
it  in  the  mailbox  at  your  convenience? 

"Is  there  a  television  set  in  working  condition  now  in  your 
home  or  place  of  business?  Yes _ __  No _ 

"If  there  is,  what  is  the  make  and  model  of  the  set(s)? _ ff 

In  addition  to  asking  for  the  name  and  address  of  the  tele¬ 
vision  owner,  the  telephone  number  is  requested.  The  recipient  is 
also  asked  to  watch  for  the  announcement  soon  of  the  inauguration  of 
WN3Wfs  television  film  projection  equipment. 

xxxxxxxxxx 


BRITISH  NOW  EXCHANGING  TELEVISION  FILMS  WITH  U.S. 


The  British  Broadcasting  Corporation  has  been  exchanging 
topical  films  with  the  National  Broadcasting  Company.  Further  ex¬ 
changes  with  television  companies  in  other  countries  may  follow  and 
lead  ultimately  to  the  production  of  an  international  television  news 
reel. 


The  BBC  has  decided  to  expand  its  Television  Film  Unit  in 
order  to  provide  viewers  with  regular  programs  of  topical  events 
already  covered  by  television  "Outside  Broadcasts".  It  is  hoped  to 
start  a  regular  weekly  program  before  the  end  of  the  year,  increas¬ 
ing  this  to  two  programs  weekly  and  finally  to  a  change  of  program 
every  day.  Equipment  and  staff  are  now  being  obtained. 

Since  before  the  BBC  Television  Service  reopened  in  1946 
after  its  wartime  close-down,  the  BBC  has  been  trying  to  make  arrange 
ments  with  the  film  industry  to  televise  the  ordinary  film  newsreels, 
as  was  done  before  the  war.  So  far  there  has  been  no  sign  of  any 
such  cooperation  from  the  film  industry  and  no  newsreels  have  been 
televised. 


XXXXXXXXXX 


-  12  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/3/47 


SCISSORS  AND  PASTE 


The  Stalemate  In  FM 
(Jack  Gould  in  "New  York  Times’1 * * * * * 7) 

FM  pioneers  have  had  an  extraordinarily  hard  road  to 
travel  thus  far  and  the  way  ahead  undoubtedly  will  be  difficult  for 
many.  Many  manufacturers  are  only  beginning  to  pay  appropriate 
attention  to  the  production  of  FM  receivers,  having  been  preoccup¬ 
ied  up  to  now  in  skimming  the  cream  of  the  post-war  demand  with  old- 
fashioned  and  out-of-date  conventional  sets. 

The  attitude  of  the  networks,  at  least  locally,  may  be 
judged  by  the  fact  that  they  are  expending  an  absolute  minimum  of 
promotional  and  program  effort  on  their  FM  outlets.  The  three 
chains  with  FM  affiliates  in  New  York,  in  fact,  do  not  even  bother 
to  send  the  newspapers  daily  program  schedules  for  their  frequency 
modulation  outlets,  though  they  do  find  time  for  an  almost  hourly 
deluge  of  publicity  ballyhoo  for  standard  and  television  programs. 

In  the  case  of  FM  the  conclusion  is  inescapable  that  the  networks 
are  not  interested  in  retaining  the  initiative  which  they  so  Jeal¬ 
ously  guard  and  exploit  in  standard  radio  and  video. 

Mr.  petrillo,  who  knows  the  real  facts  of  the  FM  situa¬ 
tion  as  well  as  any  man,  ironically  enough  also  has  taken  a  seat  out 
on  the  end  of  the  limb  with  the  same  people  he  has  been  fighting  for 
years. 


Believes  Television  Competition  Will  Be  Patter  To  Death 

( Rudy  Vallee  in  ’’Variety  WT~ 

I  would  like  to  make  the  following  prediction:  that  tele¬ 
vision,  unless  it  kills  itself  off  by  either  bad  technical  faults 

or,  and  most  important,  continues  slipshod,  stiff  and  amateurish 

live  production,  as  it  is  now  doing,  will  create  a  change  in  our 
lives  such  as  we  never  believed  would  be  possible,  and  will  keep  the 

family  home  four  nights  a  week. 

I  say  four,  because  I  believe  that  mother  will  demand 
that  she  get  away  from  the  hot  stove  and  the  kitchen  at  least  three 
nights  a  week,  but  the  tired  laborer,  and  even  the  tired  businessman 

in  the  average  home  is  going  to  put  on  a  comfortable  pair  of  slip¬ 
pers  and  a  bathrobe,  and  four  nights  a  week,  between  the  hours  of 

7  and  10,  it  is  my  humble  opinion  that  he  is  going  to  ensconse  him¬ 
self  in  a  comfortable  chair,  with  a  glass  of  refreshing  liquid  at 
his  elbow,  cigar  or  pipe  in  his  mouth,  and  enjoy  the  fine  15-minute, 
half  hour  and  one-hour  film  productions  which  are  going  to  be  offer¬ 
ed  him. 

He  is  certainly  not  going  to  shave,  climb  into  a  fresh 
shirt  and  suit,  get  the  car  out  of  the  garage,  drive  down  a  slippery, 
icy  street  hunting  for  a  parking  place  or  parking  lot,  plunk  down  a 
parking  charge  and  then  purchase  tickets  to  go  into  a  dark  theatre, 
not  knowing  who  is  seated  around  him,  when  he  can  have  in  his  own 
home  pictures  which  may  not  be  quite  as  outstanding  in  production 


13  - 


HeinI  Radio  News  Service 


9/3/47 


as  those  he  could  see  in  a  theatre,  but  films  which  will  bring  him 
new  stars  who  will  in  time  become  stars  of  television  as  we  have 
created  stars  in  radio. 

Perhaps  I  am  being  over-practical  and  perhaps  the  present 
habit  of  going  out  is  too  deeply  rooted  in  the  American  home,  but 
the  challenge  to  the  makers  of  film  production  for  television  is 
one  that  will  not  be  lightly  ignored  by  those  who  are  going  to  make 
productions  for  television.  As  I  see  it,  it  will  be  a  battle  to  the 
death,  and  even  if  at  the  end  of  a  year  the  curiosity  on  the  part  of 
the  family  at  home  becomes  satiated  with  the  excellent  television 
in  the  home,  the  damage  to  the  neighborhood  house  may  have  been  done. 

As  for  radio,  I  agree  with  Arch  Oboler  that  the  medium 
that  has  done  so  much  for  me  will  be  deader  than  a  dodo  bird. 


New  Fans  For  Sally 

( n  Variety rt5 

Fan  dancer  Sally  Rand,  without  her  fans,  helped  Jon  Hack- 
ett  broadcast  a  local  baseball  game  on  KRNT,  Des  Moines,  last  week, 
on  eve  of  her  arrival  in  town  for  an  Iowa  State  Fair  booking. 

Along  the  way,  Miss  Rand  acquired  some  new  fans  -  some 
ardent  listeners,  that  is.  The  station  said  the  response  was  that 
good. 


Women  At  The  BBC 

("^London  Calling1*) 

There  is  still  a  percentage  of  women  holding  responsible 
positions  in  British  broadcasting  -  a  development  which  was  greatly 
accelerated  by  the  war. 

In  wartime,  the  BBC  was  regarded  as  one  of  the  national 
organizations  which  must  be  maintained  as  vital  to  the  war  effort, 
but  that  did  not  exempt  it  from  releasing  for  active  service  every 
man,  however  valuable,  who  could  possibly  be  spared.  This  meant 
that  more  and  more  jobs  were  taken  over  by  women. 

The  admission  of  women  to  the  Engineering  Division  -  one 
of  the  greatest  of  the  wartime  changes  -  proved  extremely  success¬ 
ful,  and  some  800  women  were  employed  on  studio  and  transmitter 
work  at  BBC  stations  throughout  the  country.  An  average  figure  for 
London  during  the  war  period  was  between  300  and  400,  It  included 
engineers  and  junior  program  engineers,  recording  technical  assist¬ 
ants,  transcription  recording  assistants,  and  recording  maintenance 
assistants.  The  first  women  P.E.  (program  engineer)  was  Miss  Maureen 
Hanna,  from  County  Down. 

Then  there  are  the  women  who  became  announcers  in  Horae, 
Overseas,  and  European  Services;  ’’commeres”  in  the  overseas  programs 
for  H.M.  Forces;  talks  producers  and  producers  of  many  of  the  special 
industrial  and  Service  feature  programs;  news  editors  in  the  European 
and  Overseas  Services;  presentation  assistants  and  script  writers. 

XXXXXXXX 


14 


. .  .  •  ....  .  ■  * 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/3/47 


TRADE  NOTES 


Edwin  M.  Martin,  Vice-President  of  the  Farnsworth  Tele¬ 
vision  and  Radio  Corporation,  was  elected  a  Director  of  the  American 
Bosch  Corporation  last  week.  Prior  to  joining  the  Farnsworth  man¬ 
agement  in  1939,  Mr.  Martin,  who  has  served  as  Assistant  to  the 
Attorney  General,  was  a  patent  counsel  for  the  Hazeltine  Corporation 
and  the  American  Locomotive  Company. 

He  directed  Farnsworth's  legal  action  when  the  company 
last  February  became  the  first  in  the  nation  to  win  dismissal  of  a 
portal-to-portal  pay  suit  with  prejudice  against  the  plaintiff. 

Majestic  Radio  and  Television  Corporation  -  Year  to  May 
31:  Consolidated  loss,  $264,372,  compared  with  a  loss  of  $464,987 
in  the  year  to  May  31,  1946, 


R.  J.  E.  Silvey,  BBC's  Listener  Research  Director  arrived 
in  New  York  last  Sunday  to  attend  the  Second  International  Confer¬ 
ence  to  be  held  at  Williams  College,  Wllliajnstown,  Massachusetts, 
sponsored  by  the  NORC  (National  Opinion  Research  Center). 

luring  his  stay,  Mr.  Silvey  hopes  to  get  a  full  picture 
of  Radio  Audience  Research  as  it  is  conducted  in  the  U.  S.  and  to 
familiarize  the  American  experts  with  BBC's  research  techniques. 


A  group  in  Hollywood  composed  of  Dana  Andrews,  Joan  Fon¬ 
taine,  John  Garfield,  Myrna  Loy  and  Ray  Milland  and  radio  producer 
Arthur  Kurlan,  has  formed  Radio  Repertory  Theatre,  Inc.,  a  closed 
California  corporation  in  which  all  have  an  equal  ownership. 

Also  among  the  activities  planned  are  manufacture  of 
transcriptions  and  recordings,  purchase  and  development  of  story 
properties  for  regular  radio  production,  and  possible  purchase  and 
operation  of  radio  stations. 

There  will  be  a  nation-wide  tour  of  the  "Golden  Throat" 
demonstration,  illustrating  the  post-war  tonal  advances  featured  in 
RCA  Victor  radio-phonographs. 

The  two-piano  team  of  Carlile  and  Wayne,  frequently  heard 
on  the  NBC  network,  will  travel  with  the  show.  One  of  the  pianists 
will  play  directly  before  the  audience.  The  second  pianist  will 
broadcast  from  an  adjacent  room,  via  a  low-powered  transmitter,  and 
be  heard  via  a  Crestwood  radio-phonograph  placed  beside  the  "live" 
piano.  Members  of  the  audience  will  be  selected  at  random  to  try  to 
tell,  without  looking,  which  of  the  pianists  is  playing.  Partici¬ 
pants  in  Chicago  and  New  York,  trying  to  distinguish  between  the 
"live"  and  broadcast  piano  music,  were  unable  to  correctly  indicate 
the  source  of  the  music. 


The  installation  and  service  charge  for  United  States 
Television's  home  console  model  has  been  reduced  to  $39.  The  pre¬ 
vious  installation  and  service  charge  was  $100  for  the  televi  sion 
set  which  includes  10-inch  direct  view  television,  AM  and  FM  radio 
as  well  as  short  wave,  and  automatic  re cord- changing  phonograph. 


15  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/3/47 


Executives  of  the  American  Broadcasting  Company  attending 
the  forthcoming  convention  of  the  National  Association  of  Broad¬ 
casters  will  fly  to  Atlantic  City  in  the  network5 s  recently  pur¬ 
chased  airplane  -  a  twin/ engine  Beechcraft  D-1S-S,  piloted  by 
Frederick  G.  McNally  of  ABC’s  station  relations  department,  who  was 
in  the  U. S.  Army  Air  Force  in  World  War  II, 

The  plane  which  will  be  used  regularly  for  network  and 
station  business  by  ABC  will  be  operated  in  a  shuttle  service  bet¬ 
ween  New  York  and  Atlantic  City  starting  Friday  afternoon,  Sept.  12 
and  concluding  Sunday  afternoon,  Sept.  14,  when  Edward  J.  Noble, 
ABC's  Chairman  of  the  Board,  Mark  Woods,  President,  and  Robert  E. 
Kintner,  Executive  Vice-President  of  the  network  arrive. 


Major  changes  in  the  program  schedule  for  the  18th  con¬ 
secutive  year  of  Columbia  network’s  "School  of  the  Air”,  heading  up 
the  five-a-*week  series  with  an  exciting  new  dramatic  series  titled 
"Liberty  Road",  are  revealed  in  the  calendar  manual,  half  a  million 
copies  of  which  are  to  be  distributed  to  listeners  from  coast-to- 
coast.  The  manual  covers  broadcasts  for  the  1947-43  season  beginn¬ 
ing  on  Monday,  October  6  (CBS,  5:00-5:30  P.M. ,  EST.  Mon. -thru- Fri.  ) . 


The  thirteenth  anniversary  of  the  Morris  B.  Sachs  Amateur 
Hour  will  be  celebrated  over  Stations  WENR  and  WCFL  in  Chicago 
Sunday,  September  7th,  at  12:30  CDT.  This  is  the  oldest  program  of 
its  kind  on  the  air.  The  anniversary  broadcast  will  mark  the  676th 
consecutive  weekly  broadcast. 

During  the  years  of  its  existence,  more  than  8,000  con¬ 
testants,  ranging  in  age  from  four  to  110,  have  performed  on  the 
program.  Studio  audiences  during  the  period  have  totaled  more  than 
half-a-million  persons. 

Edward  Leo  Delaney,  61-year  old  American  citizen,  who  was 
arrested  on  August  3th  by  agents  of  the  Federal  Bureau  of  Investiga- 
tion  on  a  complaint  charging  that  he  had  made  treasonable  broadcasts 
for  the  Nazi  Government,  was  released  in  New  York  last  week. 

Mr.  Delaney,  who  had  been  unable  to  raise  810,000  bail, 
had  been  under  confinement  at  the  Federal  House  of  Detention  since 
his  arrival  in  New  York  on  the  Army  transport  George  W.  Goethals. 

Thomas  de  Wolf,  a  Special  Assistant  Attorney  General,  said 
that  the  grand  jury  voted  against  an  indictment  after  having  heard 
testimony  from  eight  former  Nazi  radio  officials  and  other  evidence 
for  four  years.  Mr.  de  Wolf  said  that  while  he  could  not  discuss 
what  transpired  in  the  grand  jury  room,  that  the  Government  had  evi¬ 
dence  that  Delaney  had  ceased  his  Nazi  news  commentaries  shortly 
after  pearl  Harbor.  He  said  he  understood  that  Delaney  shortly 
thereafter  quit  all  broadcasting  and  was  permitted  to  go  to  Czecho¬ 
slovakia  to  write  a  bo  ok  against  communism.  Mr.  de  Wolf  said  that 
the  prosecution  of  treason  cases  had  been  made  more  difficult  by  a 
Supreme  Court  ruling  that  two  eye  witnesses  must  be  produced  for 
each  alleged  overt  act. 


XXXXXXXX 


16  - 


"f  V 


HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 

Radio  —  Television  —  FM  —  Communications 


2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 


Washington  8,  D.  C. 


Founded  in  1924 


Robert  D.  Heinl,  Editor 


V 


INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  SEPTEMBER  10,  1947 


Senators  Quietly  prepare  To  Blast  Press- Radio  Liquor  Ads.. . 1 

20th  Century- Fox,  RCA  To  Begin  N. Y.  Theatre  TV  Experiment s. . . . ....  2 

Broadcasters  Welcome  Threshing  Cut  Radio  Editorial  Question. ......  3 

RCA  Asks  FCC  To  Reconsider  Overseas  Rate  Increase.... . 4 

Trammell  Reminds  Broadcasters  White  Eill  Still  In  Mill . 5 

Gen.  Harbor d^s  War  Mementoes  Willed  To  Dawes  Collection,. . 6 

Magazine  Gets  Rise  Out  Of  NAB  For  Jumping  The  Gun  On  Code. ........  7 

Reinsch  To  TiTrite  Book  On  Radio  Station  Management . 7 

Petrillo  FM  Music  Duplication  Awaited..... . . . . . 8 

Gen.  Ingles  RCA  Communications  Pres.;  Jolliffe  RCA  Director . 9 

Tube  production  Reflects  Season  Slump . 9 

India’s  Unrest  Causes  Bombay  Radio  Exhibition  Postponement . .9 

Experimental  Television  Relay  Demonstrated  In  Britain . 10 

Unesco  Vetoes  World  Radio  Net  But  Still  Plays  With  Idea . .....10 

Great  Increase  In  Radio  Exports  Shown . . . . . 11 

Washington  Teachers  Attend  First  Lecture  By  Television.  11 

Partition  Of  India  May  End  "All-India  Radio" .  12 

"Daylight  Saving  -It’s  Wonderful  " . 12 

Scissors  And  Paste . 13 

New  300- Square- Inch  Picture  Tele  Set  Announced  By  RCA  Victor, .... 14 

Trade  Notes . 15 


No.  1791 


•  \ 


September  10,  1947 


SENATORS  QUIETLY  PREPARE  TO  BLAST  PRESS-RADIO  LIQUOR  ADS 


A  group  of  determined  Senators  are  all  set  for  a  drastic 
move  when  Congress  convenes  next  January  which  will  stir  up  the 
biggest  fight  between  wets  and  drys  since  the  old  prohibition  days. 

It  will  be  the  launching  of  another  attack  on  newspaper,  magazine, 
and  radio  liquor  advertising  -  but  from  an  entirely  new  angle. 

The  leaders  in  this  will  be  two  fresh  recruits  -  Senators 
Clyde  M.  Reed  (R),  of  Kansas,  and  Edwin  M.  Johnson  (D),  of  Colorado, 
who  will  be  entirely  unhampered  in  his  efforts  since  he  is  not  up 
for  re-election.  These  Senators  entered  the  fray  through  being 
members  of  an  Interstate  Commerce  subcommittee  to  revise  a  bill  by 
veteran  Senator  Arthur  Capper  ( R) ,  of  Kansas  under  which  all  liquor 
advertising  would  be  banned  from  interstate  commerce.  Senator  Capper 
who  hails  from  one  of  the  most  famous  dry  states  in  the  Union,  has 
been  introducing  this  bill  into  every  Congress  in  the  past  20  years 
but  it  has  never  gotten  anywhere. 

However,  Senators  Reed  and  Johnson,  after  the  hectic  hear¬ 
ings  which  were  held  on  the  Capper  Bill  last  Spring  taking  note  of 
the  growing  in  the  subject  came  to  the  conclusion  that  the  Capper 
bill  was  too  drastic  and  too  direct.  They  therefore  recommended 
that  instead  of  drafting  a  new  law  such  as  that,  better  results 
might  be  achieved  through  an  amendment  to  the  old  Federal  Trade 
Commission  Act, 

This  would  make  it  illegal,  they  said,  for  liquor  adver¬ 
tisers  to  "imply  that  young  folks  have  to  absorbe  a  lot  of  booze  if 
they  are  going  to  amount  to  anything. " 

The  amendment  would  forbid  the  publication  or  broadcast 
of  advertisements  which  "by  word,  device  or  sound"  imply  that  the 
use  of  liquor  is  beneficial  to  health,  would  increase  social  or 
business  prestige,  or  is  traditional  in  American  family  life.  Ads 
which  contained  such  "implications "  would  be  classed  as  "misleading 
under  the  Federal  Trade  Act". 

The  new  version  was  drafted  by  Senator  Reed.  Senator 
Johnson  endorsed  it  but  said  that  it  does  not  go  quite  far  enough. 

He  suggested  an  added  clause  to  make  it  illegal  for  any  liquor,  wine 
or  beer  advertisement  to  include  a  picture  of  a  woman,  child  or 
family  scene. 

The  Senators  in  their  recommendation  said  they  found  maga¬ 
zine  color  ads  to  be  the  principal  offenders.  They  were  particularly 
concerned  that  such  copy  was  "persuading  young  people  that  it  is 
socially  smart  to  drink". 

It  is  certain  the  cudgel  will  be  promptly  taken  up  on  this 
measure  by  the  Licensed  Beverage  Industries.  A  new  champion  will  be 
Frank  Mason,  wartime  Assistant  to  Secretary  of  Navy  Knox,  and 


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9/10/47 


ex-president  of  the  International  News  Association,  who  recently 
took  over  as  head  of  the  U,  S.  Brewer’s  Foundation.  Mr.  Mason  will 
give  special  attention  to  the  radio  angle  since  he  is  also  an  out¬ 
standing  authority  in  this  subject  having  for  years  been  Vice-presi¬ 
dent  of  the  National  Broadcasting  Company.  Mr.  Mason’s  argument  is 
that  as  long  as  beer  is  legal,  it  is  advertisable. 

Editor  and  Publisher  takes  a  dim  view  of  the  proposed 
Reed- Johnson  amendment  to  the  Federal  Trade  Act,  saying: 

"The  Senate  subcommittee  interested  in  the  campaign 
against  liquor  advertising  has  been  deluded  into  believing  this  is 
the  best  method  of  combatting  juvenile  drinking.  Previously,  they 
wanted  to  ban  all  liquor  advertising.  Now,  under  an  amendment  to 
the  FTC  law,  this  group  would  bar  alcoholic  beverage  advertisements 
containing  representations  ’by  statement,  word,  design,  device, 
sound,  or  any  combination  thereof,  that  the  use  of  such  alcoholic 
beverage  (a)  is  beneficial  to  health  or  contributes  to  physical  up¬ 
building,  (b)  will  increase  social  prestige  or  business  standing  or 
prestige,  or  (c)  is  traditional  in  American  family  life  or  is  or 
should  be  a  part  of  the  atmosphere  of  the  American  home. " 

"The  sale  and  consumption  of  liquor  is  legal  in  most  parts 
of  the  country.  Local  or  State  laws  are  controlling  in  setting  age 
limits  for  citizens  below  which  they  may  not  purchase  liquor.  If 
Congress  is  interested  in  stopping  illegal  drinking  it  should  attack 
it  at  the  source,  where  it  is  sold  and  consumed.  Attempting  to  cen¬ 
sor  advertising  for  the  influence  it  allegedly  has  in  driving  youths 
or  anyone  else,  to  drink  is  like  prohibiting  the  advertisements  for 
new  automobiles  because  it  provides  an  unconquerable  impulse  for 
kids  and  adults  to  swipe  their  old  man  ’  s  or  someone  else’s  car  and 
go  for  a  joyride.  " 

It  is  believed  that  the  Reed-Johnson  amendment  will  be 
taken  up  early  in  the  next  session  of  Congress  and  if  approved  by 
the  Senate  Interstate  Commerce  Committee  will  be  introduced  in  the 
Senate  where  its  proponents  will  press  for  immediate  action. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

20 TH  CENTURY-FOX,  RCA  TO  BEGIN  N.Y.  THEATRE  TV  EXPERIMENTS 

The  establishment  of  New  York  as  the  developmental  center 
in  the  East  for  uses  of  television  in  the  motion  picture  industry 
was  assured  with  the  announcement  this  week  by  RCA  Victor  Division 
of  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America  and  the  20th  Century-Fox  Film 
Corporation  of  the  signing  of  a  contract  for  a  joint  program  of 
research  on  large-screen  television. 

The  cooperative  project  will  be  centered  in  the  film  com¬ 
pany’s  Movietone  Newsreel  studios  in  mid-Manhattan.  The  program  of 
joint  research  follows  closely  the  conclusion  of  an  identical  con¬ 
tract  between  RCA  and  Warner  Brothers  Pictures,  Inc.  The  Warner 
project  is  being  conducted  on  the  West  Coast  at  the  Warner’s  Burbank 
studios. 

Delivery  of  the  first  elements  of  the  large-screen  equip¬ 
ment  developed  by  RCA  will  begin  in  the  early  Fhll. 

XXXXXXXXXX  -2- 


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9/10/47 


BROADCASTERS  WELCOME  THRESHING-  OUT  RADIO  EDITORIAL  QUESTION 


Justin  Miller,  President  of  the  National  Association  of 
Broadcasters,  lost  no  time  endorsing  a  showdown  as  to  whether  or  not 
there  should  be  radio  editorials.  He  said: 

"I  am  delighted  to  learn  that  the  Federal  Communications 
Commission  has  set  January  12,  194  3,  for  hearings  on  the  Mayflower 
Decision.  This  decision,  which  proscribes  editorializing  on  the  air, 
long  has  stood  as  one  of  the  most  serious  abridgments  of  free  speech, 
and  certainly  represents  a  philosophy  that  is  contrary  to  the  prin¬ 
ciples  of  the  Constitution,  11 

The  issues  as  stated  by  the  Commission  are: 

(1)  "To  determine  whether  the  expression  of  editorial 
opinions  by  broadcast  station  licensees  on  matters  of  public  inter¬ 
est  and  controversy  is  consistent  with  their  obligations  to  operate 
their  stations  in  the  public  interest”,  and  (2)  "To  determine  the 
relationship  between  any  such  editorial  expression  and  the  affirm¬ 
ative  obligation  of  the  licensees  to  insure  that  afair  and  equal 
presentation  of  ell  sides  of  controversial  issues  is  made  over  their 
facilities.  " 

The  Commission  said  it  ordered  the  inquiry  because  of 
widespread  discussion  in  the  industry  over  "the  exact  meaning"  of  the 
so-called  "Mayflower  Decision"  1941  FCC  ruling  which  said  in  part: 

"The  broadcaster  cannot  be  an  advocate. " 

It  said  some  radio  interests  have  expressed  belief  broad¬ 
casting  stations  should  have  wider  freedom  of  expression  than  that 
allowed  in  the  1941  ruling. 

That  ruling  was  made  in  connection  with  an  application 
by  radio  station  WAA3,  operated  by  the  Yankee  Network  at  Boston  for 
a  renewal  of  license. 

The  Commission  questioned  the  station's  practice  of  broad¬ 
casting  "so-called  editorials  from  time  to  time  urging  the  election 
of  various  candidates  for  political  office  or  supporting  one  side 
or  another  of  various  questions  in  public  controversy. " 

A  Commission  statement  at  that  time  added: 

"In  these  editorials,  which  were  delivered  by  the  editor 
in  chief  of  the  station's  news  service,  no  pretense  was  made  at  ob¬ 
jective,  impartial  reporting.  It  is  clear  -  indeed  the  station  seems 
to  have  taken  pride  in  the  fact  -  that  the  purpose  of  these  editor¬ 
ials  was  to  win  public  support  for  some  person  or  view  favored  by 
those  in  control  of  the  station.  " 

The  WAAB  license  was  renewed  only  after  the  editorial 
broadcasts  were  discontinued. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

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He lnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/10/47 


RCA  ASKS  FCC  TO  RECONSIDER  OVERSEAS  RATE  INCREASE 


The  Radio  Corporation  has  filed  with  the  Federal  Communi¬ 
cations  Commission  a  petition  requesting  reconsideration  of  its 
recent  order  increasing  rates,  on  the  ground  that  the  increases 
ordered  are  inadequate.  Tropical  Radio  and  the  .American  CabLe  and 
Radio  companies,  as  mentioned  last  week,  have  filed  similar  peti¬ 
tions.  Thus  all  of  the  large  carriers  involved,  except  Western 
Union,  have  appealed  the  decision.  A  table  in  the  Commission1 s 
decision  shows  that  the  Western  Union  cables  would  receive  the 
largest  amount  of  additional  revenue  and  they  have  apparently  decid¬ 
ed  to  accept  the  new  rates  without  appeal. 

RCA’s  petition,  submitted  by  its  attorneys  (Hen  McDaniel 
and  Howard  Hawkins,  points  out  that  the  FCC!s  own  estimate  of  the 
increased  revenue  to  RCA  would  be  less  than  half  of  the  $3,500,000 
which  RCA  testified  at  the  hearing  would  be  necessary  for  it  to  earn 
the  rate  of  return  on  its  invested  capital  to  which  it  believes  it 
is  entitled. 

Furthermore,  RCA  points  out  that  the  actual  results  from 
its  operations  for  the  first  seven  months  of  1947  are  less  favorable 
than  estimated  at  the  time  of  the  hearing,  so  that,  together  with 
further  increased  labor  costs  effective  November  1,  1947,  the  actual 
increase  will  be  less  than  half  that  estimated  in  the  Commission^ 
decision. 


RCA  reminds  the  FCC  that  in  place  of  the  23  cent  rate 
requested  for  Europe  and  South  America,  the  Commission  granted  only 
25  cents  to  Europe  and  22  cents  to  South  America;  to  Far  Eastern 
points  where  RCA  requested  a  42  cent  rate,  only  30  cents  was  approv¬ 
ed.  The  Bermuda  Conference,  RCA  states,  at  which  the  British  agreed 
to  a  ceiling  of  30  cents  per  word,  had  as  its  basic  principle  the 
fact  that  the  rates  in  both  directions  would  be  identical  but  due  to 
the  fact  that  the  inbound  rates  are  substantially  in  excess  of  the 
new  outbound  rates,  RCA  is  required  to  pay  out  to  foreign  administra¬ 
tions  amounts  in  excess  of  the  gross  tolls  collected  from  the  American 
public. 


The  petition  concludes  with  an  affidavit  from  RCA*s  Con¬ 
troller  Lon  A.  Cearley  including  three  tables  of  figures  leading  up 
to  the  fact  that  the  new  rates,  instead  of  bringing  RCA  over  a  mil¬ 
lion  in  net  income  will  in  fact  produce  less  than  half  a  million 
dollars  before  income  taxes. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

The  fourth  RMA  Industrial  Relations  Seminar  in  Chicago 
November  13th  will  deal  chiefly  with  the  application  of  the  Taft- 
Hartley  Act  to  the  radio  industry. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


4 


Helnl  Radio  News  Se rvice 


9/10/47 


TRAMMELL  REMINDS  BROADCASTERS  WHITE  BILL  STILL  IN  MILL 


A  gentle  reminder  to  the  broadcasting  industry  that  the 
Bill  -of  Senator  Wallace  White  (R),  of  Maine,  to  amend  the  Communica¬ 
tions  Act  still  awaits  action  on  Capitol  Hill  is  an  80-page  booklet 
just  issued  by  the  National  Broadcasting  Company,  "A  Free  Radio  and 
the  Law.  n  It  contains  the  statement  made  by  president  Niles 
Trammell  which  attracted  so  much  attent  when  he  appeared  before  the 
Senate  subcommittee: 

11 A  free  press  today  is  one  of  the  basic  guarantees  of  a 
free  society.  Recognition  of  the  same  freedom  for  radio  will  place 
a  powerful  ally  at  the  side  of  the  press”,  Mr.  Trammell  said. 
"Together  they  will  be  able  to  withstand  any  assault  upon  democracy. " 

Mr.  Trammell  declared  in  addition  to  allowing  freedom  of 
expression,  it  is  of  the  utmost  importance  that  such  new  legisla¬ 
tion  as  may  be  enacted  shall  allow  for  the  great  technical  advances 
in  the  electronic  art  and  provide  encouragement  for  the  industry 
that  must  find  new  capital  to  finance  a  vast  program  of  expansion. 

"Many  radio  broadcasters  of  today  will  become  the  electron¬ 
ic  publishers  of  tomorrow",  Mr.  Trammell  continued.  "They  will  be 
engaged  in  the  distribution  of  newsreels  and  motion  pictures  to  the 
home  by  electronic  means.  Radio  newspapers  will  become  commonplace. 
Practically  every  form  of  artistic  expression  will  become  available 
to  the  people  direct  from  studio  to  home  through  these  modern  methods 
of  mass  communication. " 

Mr.  Trammell  when  appearing  before  the  Senators  revealed 
for  the  first  time  that  RCA  Laboratories  had  developed  a  revolution¬ 
ary  system  of  high-speed  communications  tentatively  referred  to  as 
"Ultrafax",  which  incidentally  is  expected  to  be  demonstrated  in 
Washington  perhaps  within  the  next  month. 

Explaining  that  "Ultrafax"  is  an  outgrowth  of  television, 
Mr.  Trammell  said: 

"In  effect,  it  is  a  radio-mail  system,  which  will  surpass 
radio telegraphy,  wire  telegraphy,  cables,  and  air  mail  in  speed  of 
operation.  Here  television  is  used  for  communications. 

"preliminary  tests  through  the  air  have  revealed  that  this 
new  system,  which  utilizes  microwave  radio  relays,  is  practical,  and 
that  it  has  a  potential  for  handling  more  than  a  million  words  a 
minute. 

"In  other  words,  this  system  could  transmit  twenty  50,000- 
word  novels  from  New  York  to  San  Francisco  in  only  60  seconds.  Each 
printed  page  is  treated  as  a  frame  of  a  television  picture,  and  each 
page  is  flashed  in  rapid  succession.  At  the  receiving  end,  the 
pages  are  reproduced  by  new  high-speed  photographic  processes  for 
quick  delivery. 


-  5  - 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/10/47 


"Letters,  business  documents,  checks,  photographs,  news¬ 
papers  and  magazines  can  be  handled  in  the  same  way.  In  addition, 
these  microwave  circuits  can  simultaneously  carry  ordinary  tele¬ 
phone  speech  and  telegrams,  and  also  provide  inter-city  network 
for  television  as  well  as  standard  and  FM  broadcast  programs. 

"World-wide  radio  and  domestic  telegraphic  communications 
as  we  know  them  today  will,  in  the  light  of  this  development,  make 
present-day  communications  appear  as  slow  as  the  ox  cart  compared 
with  a  Stratoliner.  " 

Mr.  Trammell  concluded  his  appeal  to  the  Senate  with; 

"In  the  United  States  the  free  radio  we  have  enjoyed  is 
threatened  by  the  continued  encroachment  on  the  rights  of  the  pub¬ 
lic  to  receive  a  broadcasting  service  free  from  federal  regulation. 

In  the  legislation  which  we  hope  that  Congress  will  enact,  we  ask 
for  equality  with  the  press  under  all  the  laws  that  govern  our 
society.  We  reaffirm  our  previous  requests  for  legislative  safe¬ 
guards  to  protect  the  freedom  of  this  great  medium  of  mass  communi¬ 
cation.  We  urge  that  Congress  strengthen  one  of  this  nation* s  great¬ 
est  assets  for  the  preservation  of  the  American  way  of  life.  " 

XXXXXXXXXX 

GEN.  HAR30RD 1 S  WAR  MEMENTOES  WILLED  TO  DAWES  COLLECTION 

The  will  of  Lieut.  Gen.  James  G.  Harbord,  who  was  Chief 
of  Staff  to  General  Pershing  in  World  War  I  and  later,  and  Honorary 
Chairman  of  the  Hoard  of  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America,  was  filed 
for  probate  in  White  Plains,  N.Y.  last  week  in  the  Westchester 
County  Surrogate's  office.  It  gave  his  collection  of  war  mementoes 
to  the  Dawes  Arboretum,  a  foundation  in  Newark,  Ohio.  The  collec¬ 
tion  includes  maps,  letters,  decorations  and  pictures  of  World  War  I. 

General  Harbord,  who  died  on  August  20th  at  his  home  in 
Rye,  directed  in  the  will  that  his  widow,  Mrs.  Anne  Lee  Harbord, 
receive  the  home,  jewelry,  personal  effects  and  life  income  from 
the  residuary  estate.  His  entire  property  was  valued  at  "more  than 
$40,000  «. 


Six  persons  who  had  worked  for  the  General  in  his  office 
and  home  received  $1,000  each  and  a  provision  was  made  for  souvenirs 
for  four  former  military  aides.  The  will  stipulated  that  on  Mrs. 
Harbord' s  death  the  residuary  estate  is  to  be  distributed  among 
nephews  and  nieces,  George  H.  De  3a\in  of  Washington,  William  G. 

De  3aun  of  Wakarusa,  Kan.,  James  R.  De  3aun  of  Greenvale,  L.I. ,  Mrs. 
Katherine  D.  Davidson  of  Nevada,  Mo, ,  and  Mrs.  Faith  D.  Healey  of 
New  York. 


XXXXXXXXXX 
-  6  - 


/■  -  ■  , 


•? 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/10/47 


MAGAZINE  GETS  RISE  OUT  OF  NAB  FOR  JUMPING  THE  GUN  ON  CODE 


Taking  exception  to  a  report  of  the  proposed  code  publish¬ 
ed  prior  to  the  meeting  of  the  Directors  Board  of  the  National 
Association  of  Broadcasters'  convention  at  Atlantic  City  next  Monday 
(September  15),  Justin  Miller,  President  of  the  Association  sent 
the  following  telegram  to  the  NAB  Directors: 

"The  September  8  issue  of  Broadcasting  Magazine  contains 
what  is  purported  to  be  test  of  the  rNA3  Proposed  Code'.  This  is 
to  reassure  you  that  the  proposed  NAB  Standards  of  Practice  have 
not  been  released  by  this  office  and  will  not  be  released  before 
Board  members  have  had  an  opportunity  to  review  them.  The  material 
contained  in  the  Broadcasting  Magazine  report  is  substantially  in¬ 
correct  particularly  with  reference  to  the  important  limitations  on 
commercial  copy.  " 

With  the  addition  of  Robert  R.  Wason,  Chairman  of  the 
Board  of  the  National  Association  of  Manufacturers,  Paul  Whiteman, 
and  James  F.  O'Neil,  newl y  elected  Commander  of  the  American  Legion, 
as  speakers,  arrangements  for  the  Atlantic  City  Convention  are  com¬ 
plete. 


Prior  to  the  Atlantic  City  gathering  the  FM  Association 
will  hold  its  first  annual  meeting  in  New  York  City  Friday  and 
Saturday,  September  12th  and  13thf  The  principal  speaker  will  be 
FCC  Chairman  Charles  R.  Denny,  who  will  also  address  the  NAB  the 
following  Wednesday.  FM  Association  meeting  attenders  are  likewise 
expected  to  go  to  the  Atlantic  City  convention. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

REINS CH  TO  W  RITE  BOOK  ON  RADIO  STATION  MANAGEMENT 

J.  Leonard  Reinsch,  radio  advisor  to  president  Truman  and 
manager  of  radio  stations  in  Atlanta,  Dayton  and  Miami  owned  by 
former  Governor  Cox  of  Ohio,  has  Just  returned  to  Atlanta  from  New 
York  where  he  signed  an  author's  contract  for  his  new  book  which 
will  appear  early  in  1948.  The  title  will  probably  be  "Radio 
Station  Management"  and  will  cover  all  phases  of  radio  station  oper¬ 
ation. 


Regarding  reports  which  appeared  in  the  Chicago  Sun,  PM, 
Time,  and  Variety  that  a  coolness  had  sprung  up  recently  between 
President  Truman  and  Mr.  Reinsch,  the  latter  had  no  comment.  The 
story  was  that  Charles  R.  Denny,  Chairman  of  the  Federal  Communica¬ 
tions  Commission  might  resign  by  the  end  of  the  year,  and  that  the 
President  was  displeased  at  the  report  that  Mr.  Reinsch  was  to  suc¬ 
ceed  Mr.  Denny. 

"It  has  been  my  observation  in  Washington",  Mr.  Reinsch 
said,  "when  such  stories  appear,  it  is  best  to  have  no  comment.  Sub¬ 
sequent  developments  are  a  much  better  answer.  " 

XXXXXXXX 

-  7  - 


i 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/10/47 


PETRILLO  FM  MUSIC  DUPLICATION  AWAITED 


Despite  reports  that  James  C.  Petrillo,  President  of  the 
American  Federation  of  Musicians  would  stand  pat  on  banning  the 
duplication  of  music  on  FM  (frequency  modulation)  and  AM  (standard) 
stations,  no  statement  as  yet  has  been  issued  following  a  meeting  of 
network  leaders  with  Mr.  Petrillo  in  Chicago  last  Monday. 

Representing  the  broadcasters  were  Robert  Swezey,  Vice- 
President  and  General  Manager  of  the  Mutual  Broadcasting  System, 
and  Frank  p.  Schreiber,  Manager  of  WGN,  for  Mutual;  Mark  Woods, 
President,  American  Broadcasting  Company;  Frank  Mullen,  Executive 
Vice-president  of  the  National  Broadcasting  Company,  and  Frank  White, 
Treasurer  of  the  Columbia  Broadcasting  System. 

Referring  to  the  Chicago  meeting,  the  New  York  Times  said 
editorially: 

"Mr.  Petrillo  has  an  opportunity  to  further  the  interests 
of  his  membership  by  announcing  an  affirmative  reply, 

"FM  radio  holds  two  great  promises  of  particular  interest 
to  the  musician.  The  first  and  more  publicized  is  its  reproduction 
of  music  with  a  fidelity  and  freedom  from  noise.  The  second,  and 
probably  more  important  from  Mr.  Petrillo* s  standpoint,  is  that  it 
will  mean  the  injection  of  vitally  needed  new  competition  in  the 
field  of  programming  through  new  FM  stations  taking  to  the  air.  That 
this  will  redound  to  the  advantage  of  Mr.  Petrillo *s  members  would 
seem  evidenced  by  the  fact  that  on  Friday  there  will  be  broadcast 
the  first  commercially  sponsored  orchestral  program  ever  carried  by 
an  FM  network. 

"But  manifestly  the  FM  industry  will  not  be  able  to  enjoy 
a  sound  financial  start  if  it  cannot  have  the  popular  national  fav¬ 
orites  represented  by  the  network  offerings.  Duplication  is  the 
essential  prerequisite  to  the  sale  of  sets  and  adapters  in  sufficient 
proportions  to  make  possible  the  new  mass  FM  medium  which  has  elicit¬ 
ed  the  enthusiasm  of  such  diverse  groups  as  labor  unions,  coopera¬ 
tives,  newspapers,  department  stores,  returning  GIs  and  the  more 
progressive  of  the  present  broadcasters. 

"In  radio  circles  Mr.  Petrillo  always  has  been  known  as  a 
thoroughgoing  realist  and,  when  the  chips  were  down,  not  lacking  in 
a  sense  of  the  practical.  Surely,  he  and  his  colleagues  on  the 
Federation* s  Executive  Board  will  recognize  that  before  they  can 
strike  a  bargain  with  a  new  industry  the  new  industry  should  have  a 
chance  to  come  into  being. " 

XXXXXXXXXX 


8 


Helnl  Radio  Nem^s  Service 


9/10/47 


GEN.  INGLES  RCA  COMMUNICATIONS  PRES. ;  JOLLIFFE  RCA  DIRECTOR 


MaJ.  Gen.  Harry  C.  Ingles  (ret.)  last  was  elected 

President  of  RCA  Communications,  Inc.  At  the  same  time  Dr.  C.  3. 
Jolliffe,  Executive  Vice-President  in  Charge  of  RCA  Laboratories, 
was  advanced  to  membership  on  the  RCA  Board  of  Directors. 

General  Ingles  is  also  a  Director  of  Radio  Corporation 
of  America  and  of  the  RCA  Communications.  David  Sarnoff  will  con¬ 
tinue  as  Chairman  of  the  RCA  Communications  Board.  Thompson  H. 
Mitchell  continues  in  the  position  of  Executive  Vice  President  of 
RCA  Communications,  Inc.,  the  position  which  he  has  held  since 
December  1945. 

Dr.  Jolliffe  joined  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America  in 
1935  as  engineer- in- charge  of  the  RCA  Frequency  Bureau.  Later  he 
became  Vice  president  and  Chief  Engineer  of  the  RCA  Victor  Division. 
In  March,  1945,  he  was  elected  Vice  President  of  Radio  Corporation 
of  America  in  charge  of  RCA  Laboratories,  and  in  December,  1945,  he 
became  Executive  Vice  president  in  charge  of  the  same  division. 

xxxxxxxxxx 

TUBE  PRODUCTION  REFLECTS  SEASONAL  SLUMP 

A  seasonal  slump,  including  plant  shutdowns  for  vacations, 
resulted  in  a  more  than  three-million  decrease  in  the  number  of 
radio  receiving  tubes  produced  in  July  as  compared  with  June,  the 
Radio  Manufacturers'  Association  has  announced, 

RMA  member-companies  manufactured  11,244,202  receiving 
tubes  in  July  as  against  15,057,109  in  June.  Total  tubes  produced 
during  the  seven  months  of  this  year  amounted  to  114,606,634. 

Of  the  July  total,  7,020,316  were  for  new  set  equipment; 
2,291,735  for  replacements;  1,310,944  for  export,  and  121,207  for 
government  agencies. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

INDIA*  S  UNREST  CAUSES  BOMBAY  RADIO  EXHIBITION  POSTPONEMENT 

The  American  Consulate  General  at  Bombay,  India,  reports 
that  the  All-India  Radio  Merchants  Association  is  organizing  a 
Conference  and  Exhibition  of  radio  and  allied  goods  of  both  foreign 
and  national  make.  The  Conference  and  Exhibition  were  originally 
scheduled  to  be  held  in  August  1947,  but  a  subsequent  communication 
received  from  the  Association  states  that  (in  view  of  the  momentous 
political  developments  taking  place  at  the  present  time  in  India) 
they  have  been  postponed  to  the  last  week  of  December  1947.  Inter¬ 
ested  American  firms  should  communicate  directly  with  the  All-India 
Radio  Merchants'  Association,  Fateh  Manzil,  First  Floor,  Opera 
House,  Bombay. 

XXXXXXXXXX 
-  9  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/10/47 


EXPERIMENTAL  TELEVISION  RELAY  DEMONSTRATED  IN  BRITAIN 


A  demonstration  was  given  in  Great  Britain  recently  of  an 
experimental  television  relay  link  by  Marconi’s  Wireless  Telegraph 
Co.  The  Alexandra  Palace  transmission  was  received  at  Danbury,  near 
Chelmsford,  and  retransmitted  to  a  receiving  site  at  Great  Bromley, 
close  to  Colchester,  the  distance  of  the  relay  being  about  24  miles. 

The  vision  channel  was  510  Mc/s  (60  cm)  and  employed  a 
carrier  power  of  some  5  watts.  Frequency  modulation  was  used,  large- 
ly  because  of  the  constancy  of  the  receiver  output  obtained  through 
the  use  of  limiters.  The  transmitting  aerial  took  the  form  of  a 
horn  radiator  mounted  on  a  mast  40  feet  above  ground  and  energized 
by  a  probe. 


At  the  receiving  end  a  paraboloid  reflector  was  used  and 
carried  at  the  200- foot  level  on  a  mast.  For  the  sound  channel  the 
transmitting  aerial  was  a  Yagi  with  a  cylindrical  reflector  and 
eight  directors.  Frequency  modulation  was  used  here  also  and  a 
power  of  100  milliwatts. 

"The  program  for  the  demonstration  originated  in  Ascot, 
so  that,  as  seen  at  Bromley,  it  traveled  by  the  BBC  outside-broad¬ 
cast  link  to  Alexandra  Palace,  from  there  to  Danbury  by  the  normal 
television  transmission,  and  from  Danbury  to  Bromley  by  the  Marconi 
link",  the  U.  S.  Commerce  Department  was  advised.  "Despite  its 
many  transformations  the  received  picture  was  extremely  good  and 
appeared  to  have  suffered  little,  if  at  all,  in  the  last  stage  of 
its  journey. 

"In  order  to  judge  the  precise  effect  of  the  link  on  pic¬ 
ture  quality  it  would  be  necessary  to  compare  relayed  and  unrelayed 
pictures  side  by  side.  It  is  understood  that  the  Marconi  Co.  hopes 
to  carry  out  such  a  trial  by  erecting  a  further  link  back  from 
Bromley  to  Danbury.  It  will  then  be  possible  to  have  cathode- ray 
tubes  side  by  side,  one  showing  the  picture  received  directly  from 
Alexandra  Palace  and  the  other  a  picture  relayed  to  Bromley  and 
then  back  to  Danbury.  By  comparing  the  two  pictures  the  effect  of 
a  two-step  relay  will  be  immediately  obvious.  " 

xxxxxxxx 

UNESCO  VETOES  WORLD  RADIO  NET  BUT  STILL  PLAYS  WITH  IDEA 

Radio  experts  from  16  nations,  during  a  six-day  confer¬ 
ence  at  Unesco  House,  recommended  "most  extensive  collaboration" 
with  existing  national  radio  organizations  but  proposed  no  immedi¬ 
ate  establishment  of  a  world-wide  radio  network  by  the  United  Nations 
Educational,  Scientific  and  Cultural  Organization. 

The  Committee  urged  the  creation  of  a  permanent  Unesco 
Commission  of  program  experts  from  18  nations  to  meet  annually  In 
Paris,  The  Commission  would  examine  the  general  nature  of  Unesco 


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Helnl  Radio  Ne ws  Service 


9/10/47 


radio  programs,  would  review  activities  in  this  field  and  propose 
action  for  the  removal  of  obstacles  to  international  exchange  of 
programs. 


On  the  proposal  for  setting  up  a  world  radio  network,  to 
be  operated  and  sponsored  by  Unesco,  there  was  considerable  disagree 
ment  by  European  delegates.  The  suggestion  was  forwarded  by  the 
.American  representative  Lloyd  A.  Free,  State  Department  consultant. 
The  group  finally  voted  against  such  a  network  with  the  provision, 
however,  that  if  the  United  Nations  network  were  not  established  the 
question  of  a  Unesco  network  should  be  re-examined, 

xxxxxxxxxx 


GREAT  INCREASE  IN  RADIO  EXPORTS  SHOWN 


By  way  of  backing  up  the  prediction  that  United  States 
radio  exports  would  exceed  $60,000,000  in  1947,  George  R,  Donnelly 
of  the  Office  of  International  Trade  in  the  Department  of  Commerce 
offers  the  following  comparison  between  the  regional  distribution 
of  U,  S.  Exports  of  Radio  Apparatus  in  1939  and  1946: 


Region 

Canada 

Latin  America 
Europe 
Asia 
Africa 


1939  Value 

$2,368,021 

7,790,902 

4,826,106 

1,689,037 

1,790,410 


1946  Value 

$  6,016,654 
23,  615,  930 
2,841,048 
4,149,153 
2,144,528 


United  States  exports  of  radio  receivers  alone  during 
1946  totaled  832,377  units,  valued  at  $23,232,973,  compared  with 
551, 846,  valued  at  $10,448,017,  in  1  939. 

XXXXXXXX 


WASHINGTON  TEACHERS  ATTEND  FIRST  LECTURE  BY  TELEVISION 

Kids  who  fire  paperwads  at  teacher  will  find  themselves 
frustrated  if  schools  make"  use  of  a  precedent  set  in  Washington 
yesterday  (September  9).  And  200  D.  C,  teachers  saw  how  it  was  done 

For  the  first  time  in  District  of  Columbia  schools,  a  man 
was  in  full  view  of  a  class  while  he  lectured  to  them  from  two  miles 
away.  It  was  done  with  television.  Edward  Scoville,  WTOP-CBS 
Director  of  Television,  lectured  from  the  DuMont  station  WTTG  down¬ 
town.  Two  miles  away,  at  Wilson  Teachers  College,  teachers  attend¬ 
ing  the  third  annual  WTOP-CBS  Radio  Workshop  heard  the  talk  on  tele¬ 
vision  screens. 


XXXXXXXXX 


11  - 


'I  ( 


He ini  Radio  News  Service 


9/10/47 


PARTITION  OF  INDIA  MAY  END  "ALL-INDIA  RADIO” 


With  the  partition  of  India,  the  title  "All-India  Radio” 
will  presumably  no  longer  be  used  by  the  broadcasting  organization 
of  either  India  or  Pakistan,  advices  to  the  Commerce  Department  indi¬ 
cate. 


Broadcasting  is  one  of  the  many  "assets”  being  considered 
by  special  committees  for  division  between  the  two  States. 

In  1927  the  Indian  Broadcasting  Company  opened  its  first 
station  -  a  1. 5-kw.  medium-wave  transmitter  in  Bombay.  In  1930 
broadcasting  was  placed  under  the  direct  control  of  the  Government 
of  India  and  was  called  the  Indian  State  Broadcasting  Service.  The 
service,  which  by  1936  was  provided  by  three  transmitters,  was  re¬ 
organized  and  renamed  All-India  Radio.  At  the  end  of  1939,  14 
transmitters  -  9  medium- wave  and  5  short-wave  -  were  in  use  in 
Dacca,  Delhi,  Bombay,  Calcutta,  Lahore,  Lucknow,  Madras,  Peshawar, 
end  Trichinopoly.  During  the  war  additional  short-wave  transmitters 
were  installed  at  Delhi  for  the  oversea  service. 

xxxxxxxxxxxx 

"DAYLIGHT  SAVING  -  IT’S  WONDERFUL” 

Taking  pen  in  hand,  F.  P.  Guthrie,  Assistant  Vice-Presi¬ 
dent  of  RCA  Communications,  Inc.,  in  the  Capital,  wrote  as  follows 
to  the  Editor  of  the  Washington  Post: 

"On  August  IS,  under  the  heading  ’Daylight  Saving*,  you 
printed  a  very  peculiar  letter  from  a  correspondent  who  asks  how 
the  advocates  of  daylight  saving  feel  about  it  now,  as  if  the  pas¬ 
sage  of  time  had  anything  to  do  with  it. 

"I  am  very  glad  to  answer  the  question:  Daylight  saving 
is  one  of  the  finest  things  ever  invented.  That  is  the  way  I  felt 
about  it  yesterday,  today  and  how  I  will  feel  about  it  tomorrow. 

"Tonight,  for  example,  there  was  not  only  time  enough 
after  dinner  to  clean  the  spark  plugs  of  the  car,  but  also  to  fix 
a  window  in  the  house.  Last  week  I  cut  the  grass  before  dark.  Over 
the  week-end  there  was  time  to  get  back  from  a  trip  to  the  beach 
before  dark. 

"It’s  wonderful.  " 

XXXXXXXXXX 


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Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/10/47 


II* 

: : :  SCISSORS  AND  PASTE 

•  •  • 

9  •  • 


Repaiivlt-Yourself  Radio 

(  "Life ",  Sept.  8) 

The  radio  (a  picture  of  which  "Life "  shows  being  crushed 
under  the  foot  of  an  180  pound  man)  is,  temporarily,  a  total  loss. 

3ut  not  for  long.  Ten  minutes  after  it  was  thus  ruthlessly  stamped 
on,  it  was  again  playing  perfectly.  Had  it  been  a  conventional 
radio,  several  days*  work  costing  two  or  three  times  the  instru¬ 
ment’s  original  purchase  price  would  have  been  required  to  restore 
it  to  operation.  This  radio  was  quickly  repaired  because  it  has 
almost  no  wire  connections  and  all  its  parts  are  replaceable  simply 
by  plugging  new  ones  into  the  plastic  chassis  after  faulty  parts 
have  been  removed. 

Called  the  Cosmo  Compo,  the  set  is  based  on  a  new  con¬ 
struction  principle.  All  of  the  many  small  and  intricate  parts 
which  clutter  the  undersides  of  ordinary  radios  have  been  built 
into  six  sub-assemblies,  or  "components",  which  are  sealed  in  metal 
cylinders.  These  components,  the  speaker  and  tuning  condenser  plug 
into  the  chassis  like  standard  vacuum  tubes,  which  the  set,  of 
course,  also  uses.  There  are  no  soldered  wire  connections  between 
them  and  the  tube  sockets,  condensers  and  other  parts  because  the 
current  is  carried  by  metal  tapes  stamped  on  the  plastic  chassis. 

The  new  radio's  debut  on  the  market  this  month  will  be 
watched  with  interest  by  the  manufacturers  of  other  low-priced  radios. 
It  will  also  be  watched  with  dismay  by  those  radio  repairmen  who 
have  relied  on  the  customer's  ignorance  of  electronics  to  foist  huge 
repair  bills  on  him.  With  this  new  radio  the  customer  can  become 
his  own  repairman.  He  can  take  his  disabled  set  to  a  store,  inter¬ 
change  its  components  with  new  ones  until  he  locates  the  trouble 
source  himself,  then  pay  a  modest  $1.35  for  a  new  component,  tube 
or  speaker. 


FM  Program  Listings  Bother  Newspapers 

(  "Editor  and  Publisher”) 

Most  daily  newspapers  in  this  country  have  been  carrying 
daily  radio  program  listings  gratis  for  many  years.  In  this  way 
they  have  contributed  millions  of  dollars  of  free  publicity  to  a 
competitive  medium.  But  few  publishers  have  objected  in  the  belief 
this  was  a  public  service. 

The  advent  of  FM  broadcasting  which  promises  to  at  least 
double  if  not  triple  the  number  of  radio  stations  in  every  commun¬ 
ity  raises  the  problem  anew  for  the  serious  consideration  of  every 
publisher.  If  the  old  procedure  is  followed,  newspapers  will  be 
contributing  more  than  twice  the  space  formerly  given  to  program 
listings.  This  is  valuable  space  in  any  newspaper.  Space  that  is 
under  constant  demand  from  both  advertising  and  editorial  depart¬ 
ments.  To  continue  gratis  listings  is  going  to  cost  publishers 


13  - 


Helnl  Radio  Ne we  Servi c e 


9/10/47 


considerable  money.  The  cost  must  be  weighed  again  against  the 
„ public  service  involved. 

A  few  newspapers  have  charged  local  stations  for  listings 
in  the  past.  But  the  new  situation  caused  by  M  has  been  met 
squarely  for  the  first  time,  we  believe,  by  two  Miami  newspapers. 
They  have  successfully  sold  local  radio  stations,  including  those 
whose  programs  were  formerly  carried  free,  on  paying  a  new  low  rate 
for  this  space. 

All  publishers  will  study  this  development  closely.  Many 
radio  stations  will  strongly  oppose  institution  of  such  charge  for 
their  listing.  But  the  justification  for  establishing  this  new 
rate  for  program  listings  is  apparent.  Station  owners  will  have  to 
admit  that  the  cost  of  carrying  more  and  more  listings  free  for  the 
new  stations  being  started  is  an  unjust  burden  of  expense  for  news¬ 
papers  that  should  be  shared  by  the  medium  getting  the  direct  bene¬ 
fit  from  it. 


Toothsome  Detail  Of  FDR  Broadcast 
(From  the  book  lfReilly  of  the  white  House  publishe d  by 
Simon  and  Schuster,  New  York) 

As  the  broadcast  time  approached  the  president  would  dig 
into  his  pockets,  search  around,  and  then  grin  helplessly  at  one  of 
us.  Whichever  of  us  he  grinned  at  would  nod,  walk  quietly  out  of 
the  Oval  Room,  then  run  like  blazes  up  to  the  president’s  bedroom, 
where  we’d  search  out  the  little  silver  box  in  which  he  carried  a 
pivot  tooth.  We’d  bring  the  little  box  to  him  as  unobtrusively  as 
possible  and  often,  even  as  radioman  Carlton  Smith  or  John  Daly  was 
making  his  brief  introductory  remarks  preceding  a  speech,  the  Boss 
would  be  sitting  before  his  mike,  grimly  screwing  the  tooth  into 
his  lower  jaw. 


xxxxxxxxxxxx 

NEW  300- SQUARE-INCH  PICTURE  TELE  SET  ANNOUNCED  BY  RCA  VICTOR 

First  of  RCA  Victor’s  new  large-screen  television  receivers, 
providing  pictures  almost  as  large  as  a  newspaper  page  and  50  foot 
lamberts  in  brightness  or  about  five  times  as  bright  as  the  average 
motion  picture,  was  announced  this  week  by  Henry  G-.  Baker,  General 
Sales  Manager  of  the  company’s  Home  Instrument  Department,  most 
movies  have  a  brightness  of  10  foot-lam bers  or  less. 

The  set,  presenting  a  15  x  20  inch  television  picture 
(300  square  inches  in  area),  also  includes  standard  broadcast,  FM, 
and  shortwave  radio.  Suggested  retail  price  for  the  unit  is  $1195, 
plus  $11.05  Federal  Excise  Tax  and  $95  for  the  RCA  Victor  Television 
Owner’s  policy,  which  covers  the  antenna,  installation  of  antenna 
and  receiver,  and  a  year’s  service  and  maintenance  of  the  complete 
instrument,  including  any  necessary  replacement  of  parts. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


14  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/10/47 


Stromberg- Carl son  Company  this  week  introduced  its  1948 
line  of  FM-AM  radio  receivers  at  the  conclusion  of  a  two-day  Middle 
Atlantic  and  Eastern  States  regional  distributors  meeting  in  New 
York  City.  Feature  of  the  presentation  were  the  first  two  post-war 
television  units  produced  by  the  company.  Both  are  consoles  with 
direct-view  ten-inch  tubese  The  first  unit  is  a  straight  video  mod¬ 
el,  while  the  second  has  AM--FM  radio  and  an  automatic  record  changer. 


When  Major  Edwin  He  Armstrong,  the  inventor  of  FM,  decided 
to  give  the  75  delegates  to  the  recent  International  Telecommunica¬ 
tions  Conference  .in  Atlantic  City  FM/AM  table  receivers,  he  put 
Zenith  Radio  Corporation  on  the  spot. 

Hurried  calls  went  out  to  Zenith* s  distributors  and  to 
dealers*  stores  throughout  the  country,  but  only  22  of  the  desired 
model  could  be  found.  When  Zenith  employees  returned  from  vacations, 
the  first  53  FM  receivers  off  the  assembly  lines  went  direct  to 
Major  Armstrong  in  Atlantic  City. 


Samuel  H.  Northcross  has  been  appointed  Vice  President  of 
Audience  Research,  Inc.  in  charge  of  radio  research,  Dr.  George  H. 
Gallup,  President  announced  Tuesday. 

Ten  persons  who  had  attended  "You*  re  The  Top”  quiz  pro¬ 
gram  at  WTOP  studios  on  the  upper  floors  of  the  Earle  Building  in 
Washington,  got  stuck  on  the  bottom  floor  when  the  elevator  Jammed 
last  week. 

After  juggling  the  controls  for  a  few  minutes,  the  opera¬ 
tor  of  the  elevator  called  for  help.  The  operator  of  the  adjoining 
car  heard  her  and  summoned  the  building  engineers. 

An  adjoining  elevator  was  parked  parallel  with  the  stalled 
car  between  the  lobby  and  the  first  floor.  Emergency  escape  panels 
were  removed  from  the  sides  of  each  elevator  and  passengers  were 
able  to  board  the  other  car. 


Radio  coverage  has  been  extended  to  15  additional  pieces 
of  fire  apparatus  by  the  Washington  Fire  Department  which  is  now 
operating  its  own  station  WAKY. 


The  American  Broadcasting  Company  added  another  50,000 
watt  station  to  its  roster  as  KCMO  increased  its  power  and  improved 
its  frequency  on  September  9th. 


Tom  Mason  has  been  appointed  Regional  Manager,  Central 
District,  for  the  Crosley  Division  of  the  Avco  Manufacturing  Corp. 
He  has  had  extensive  experience  in  the  radio  field;  was  Manager, 
Cincinnati  Branch,  Ohio  Appliances,  Inc.,  RCA  distributors  In  Cin¬ 
cinnati,  following  his  release  from  the  Army. 

XXXXXXXX 


15 


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Founded  in  1924 


HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 


Radio  —  Television 

—  FM  — 

Communications 

2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 

Washington  8,  D.  C. 

Robert 

D.  Heinl,  Editor 

KEOEIYED 

INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  SEPTEMBER  17,  1947  SEP  18  1947 


NILES  TRAitMLL 


Broadcasters’  Convention  In  Full  Swing;  Record  Attendance . .1 

Proposal  To  Hobble  Crime  programs  Sparks  NAB  Convention . 2 

”5,000, 000  TV  Viewers  In  *48  ”,  Sarnoff;  Hits  McDonald  Proposal.  ..  .3 

FCC  Aid  Sought  In  FM  Duplication;  Dillard  New  FM  president . 5 

WIND,  Chicago,  Plans  Expanding  Baseball  To  Five  States . 7 

Blue  Book  Is  Still  Blue,  FCC  Chairman  Admonishes  Broadcasters . 8 

Overseas  Broadcast  Subsidies  Urged,  Also  "Freedom  To  Look" . 10 

Taft-Hartley  Law  May  Stop  Petrillo  Musicians  From  Making  Disks... 10 

New  47-Store  Dallas  Hotel  To  Have  TV  In  Every  Room..... . 11 

Respondent  Disappears  In  Luxor  Radio  Case . 11 

British  Plan  Big  Post-War  Reopening  Of  "Radiolympia  " . 11 

Navy  plans  $1,000,000  California  Bomb,  Quake  proof,  Station . 12 

D.  C.  Teacher  Wins  Prize  For  History  "Soap  Opera"  Idea . 12 

Scissors  And  Paste . 13 

Trade  Notes . '. . .....15 


No.  1792 


I  f 


I 


September  17,  1947 


BROADCASTERS'  CONVENTION  IN  FULL  SWING-;  RECORD  ATTENDANCE 


The  radio  industry  now  assembled  at  Atlantic  City  for  the 
25th  annual  meeting  of  the  National  Association  of  Broadcasters  has 
kept  itself  on  the  front  page  as  never  before.  Early  reports  are 
that  the  attendance  is  the  largest  in  the  history  of  the  organiza¬ 
tion  and  that  all  records  have  been  broken. 

The  first  work  of  the  convention  was  consideration  of  a 
new  code  of  standards  proposed  for  the  broadcasting  industry  which 
was  presented  Monday  by  Robert  D.  Swezey,  Vice-president  of  the 
Mutual  Broadcasting  System,  Chairman  of  the  Code  Committee,  propos¬ 
ing,  as  it  does  to  cut  advertising  on  the  air  from  15  to  20  percent, 
this  clause  of  the  code  is  expected  to  prove  one  of  the  most  contro¬ 
versial  topics  of  the  Atlantic  City  assembly.  The  main  reduction 
in  the  amount  of  time  devoted  to  commercials,  however,  would  be  in 
the  programs  before  6  P.M. 

The  proposed  new  code  which  in  agate  type  requires  about 
5  newspaper  columns  would  seriously  cramp  the  style  of  disk  jockeys 
and  restrict  audience  participation  and  "give  away"  programs. 

One  of  the  facts  brought  to  the  attention  of  the  convention 
was  that  the  National  Association  of  Broadcasters  had  no  power  to 
enforce  a  code  under  its  present  rules  and  regulations.  According 
to  Jack  Gould  of  the  New  York  Times ,  power  of  enforcement  might  come 
later  in  the  form  of  the  code  *  s  use  by  the  Federal  Communications 
Commission  as  a  minimum  standard  of  performance  for  stations  seeking 
renewal  of  their  licenses  from  the  Government. 

Highlights  in  the  proposed  new  broadcasters’  code  are: 

A  blanket  stipulation  that  no  fifteen-minute  program  con¬ 
tain  more  than  three  minutes  of  commercials,  a  provision  that  would 
strike  in  particular  at  many  disk  jockeys,  the  so-called  "give-away" 
programs  and  many  audience-participation  shows. 

The  placement  of  only  one  commercial  ’’spot”  announcement 
between  regularly  scheduled  programs.  (Many  stations  now  use  two  or 
even  three  '’spots'*  between  programs.) 

A  ban  on  any  commercial  announcement  in  the  middle  of  a 
news  broadcast  that  is  less  than  fifteen  minutes  in  length, 

A  surprise  clause  was  the  prohibition  of  the  dramatization 
of  political  or  other  controversial  issues.  This  was  construed  as 
being  aimed  at  the  Democratic  National  Committee  and  in  earlier  years 
Senator  Vandenbergh,  of  Michigan,  a  Republican,  dubbing  in  the  voice 
of  president  Franklin  D.  Roosevelt  into  political  speeches.  Senator 
Vandenbergh,  who  thought  up  the  idea  in  one  of  the  earlier  Roosevelt 
campaigns,  was  cut  off  by  the  network  but  WGN  of  the  Chicago  Tribune 
and  several  other  stations  used  it  in  full  nevertheless.  The 


t 


He ini  Radio  News  Service 


9/17/47 


Michigan  Senator  first  would  let  the  listener  hear  Roosevelt’s  cam¬ 
paign  promises  in  the  latter’s  own  words  and  then  would  tell  how  in 
his,  the  Senator's,  opinion  they  were  not  carried  out. 

The  need  for  prompt  action  by  the  broadcasters  to  meet  pub¬ 
lic  criticism  of  radio  by  the  adoption  of  a  new  code  was  voiced  by 
Sigurd  S.  Larmon,  Chairman  of  the  Board  of  Young  &  Rubicam,  one  of 
the  largest  advertising  agencies,  and  by  Charles  G-.  Mortimer,  Jr., 
Vice-president  of  the  General  Pbods  Corporation  and  Chairman  of  the 
Advertising  Council. 


xxxxxxxxxx 

PROPOSAL  TO  HOBBLE  CRIME  PROGRAMS  SPARKS  NA5  CONVENTION 

An  exciting  curtain  raiser  for  the  convention  was  when 
under  the  guiding  hand  of  Niles  Trammell,  President  of  the  National 
Broadcasting  Company,  stations  affiliated  with  N3C  voted  to  ban  the 
broadcasting  of  crime  and  mystery  programs  before  9:30  p.M.  New  York 
time. 


This  apparently  came  as  a  complete  surprise  to  the  compet¬ 
ing  networks  who,  however,  pulled  no  punches  in  expressing  them- 
selve  s. 


Frank  Stanton,  president  of  the  Columbia  Broadcasting 
System,  said  that  the  problem  of  mystery  shows  on  the  air  was  relat¬ 
ed  more  to  the  manner  in  which  they  were  presented  than  to  the  hour 
of  day  at  which  they  were  heard. 

,rIt  ’  s  not  the  mystery  show  per  se",  he  contended.  "It’s 
the  way  it’s  handled,  the  treatment  and  care  with  which  it  is  pro¬ 
duced.  " 


Mr.  Stanton  held  that  there  "was  no  magic  to  the  hour  of 
9; 30"  and  that  it  was  not  consistent  with  programming  balance  to 
group  all  programs  of  one  type  within  a  given  period. 

"It's  a  little  unrealistic",  Mr.  Stanton  added,  noting 
that  the  NBC  ban  in  the  Central  Time  zone  was  fixed  at  8:30  P.M.  when, 
he  said,  children  might  still  be  up.  " 

Edgar  Kobak,  president  of  the  Mutual  Broadcasting  System, 

declared: 


"That's  a  lot  of  hooey.  It's  just  as  though  we  were  going 
to  tell  you  that  we  won't  carry  any  soap  operas  simply  because  we 
don't  have  any. 

"Would  Trammell  (Niles  Trammell,  NBC  president)  have  done 
it  if  they  had  ten  mystery  shows  on  before  9:30?  Are  they  going  to 
take  off  their  serials,  too?  I  have  heard  some  criticism  -  much  of 
it  unjustified,  because  if  the  serial  is  handled  properly,  it  is  all 
right  -  of  them.  " 


-  2  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/17/47 


Mark  Woods,  president  of  the  American  Broadcasting  Company, 
said  that  it  was  so  much  "hokum"  to  assume  that  children  of  all  ages 
could  be  protected  from  mystery  programs  merely  by  selection  of  a 
time  limitation, 

"The  younger  children  should  be  protected  from  the  pure 
thriller,  of  course,  but  the  older  children  will  listen  to  them 
regardless",  he  said. 

For  the  central  time  zone  the  limitation  on  NBC  crime  shows 
is  fixed  at  3:30  P.M. ,  the  earlier  hour  being  due  to  technical  con¬ 
siderations  which  it  was  said  could  not  be  altered  immediately.  In 
the  mountain  and  Pacific  time  zones  the  limitation  is  put  at  9  p.M, , 
local  time. 

The  proposal  regarding  mystery  broadcasts  said: 

"While  mystery  and  crime  stories  are  as  old  as  literature 
itself,  the  vivid,  living  portrayal  of  such  dramas  on  the  air  have 
an  impact  on  the  Juvenile,  adolescent  or  impressionable  mentality 
that  cannot  be  underestimated,  " 

XXXXXXXXXX 

"5,000,000  TV  VIEWERS  IN  ’48",  SARNOFF;  HITS  McDONALD  PROPOSAL 

Television  had  its  inning  at  the  Atlantic  City  broadcast¬ 
ers’  convention  first  by  addresses  of  Sen,  David  Sarnoff,  President 
of  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America  and  Frank  E.  Mullen,  Executive 
Vice-president  of  the  National  Broadcasting  Company,  at  the  first 
annual  NBC  convention;  second,  by  General  Sarnoff  characterizing  as 
Impractical  a  proposal  by  E.  F.  McDonald,  Jr,,  of  Chicago,  president 
of  the  zenith  Radio  Corporation  to  offer  television  over  telephone 
lines;  third,  a  spirited  reply  from  Commander  McDonald;  and  fourth, 
a  demonstration  of  television  pictures  6  by  8  feet  in  size  sent  from 
New  York  to  Atlantic  City  via  Philadelphia  over  the  longest  chain 
of  micro-wave  relays  ever  used  for  this  purpose  -  a  distance  of 
200  miles. 


Asserting  that  there  would  be  5,000,000  viewers  for  tele¬ 
vision  by  the  end  of  1948,  General  Sarnoff  said  that  the  new  art  is 
"no  longer  around  the  corner,  but  right  on  the  door  step, "  He  pre¬ 
dicted  that  by  the  end  of  next  year  there  will  be  installed  and  in 
use  a  total  of  750,000  television  receivers  throughout  the  country. 

Both  General  Sarnoff  and  Mr,  Bilullen  predicted  that  sound 
and  sight  broadcasting  will  combine  in  due  course.  "The  fusion  of 
sound  broadcasting  with  television  is  destined  to  come  in  radio 
ultimately  Just  as  the  combination  of  sight  and  sound  came  in  motion 
pictures",  General  Sarnoff  said. 

"The  National  Broadcasting  Company  is  now  committed  to  the 
launching  of  television  on  a  national  scale,  and  all  of  the  net¬ 
work’s  television  resources  are  at  the  disposal  of  its  affiliates". 


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9/17/47 


said  Mr.  Mullen  further.  nThe  NBC  le  gearing  in  every  direction 
to  bring  national  television  to  this  country.  Television  is  now 
launched,  and  we  are  going  forward  with  it.  n 

Referring  to  McDonald- Zenith  proposal  of  receiving  tele¬ 
vision  programs  over  the  telephone  paying  for  such  programs  as  you 
may  desire  to  hear,  General  Sarnoff  said: 

,rA  system  of  so-called  wired  ’phone-vision'  would  intro¬ 
duce  a  monopoly  feature  into  television  by  limiting  its  service  to 
telephone  subscribers",  he  said.  .  .  the  political  implications, 

the  legal  and  regulatory  aspects,  as  well  as  the  technical  diffi¬ 
culties  of  preventing  non-payers  from  receiving  the  same  programs, 
dooms  such  an  impractical  system  at  the  start. 

"Such  a  system,  which  would  limit  its  service  only  to 
those  who  would  agree  to  pay  for  the  programs  as  well  as  for  the 
receivers,  is  an  idle  dreamn,  he  asserted. 

In  reply  to  this,  Commander  McDonald  sent  the  following 
telegram  to  the  New  York  Times: 

"Statement  of  David  Sarnoff,  quoted  by  you  in  your 
September  14  story,  attacking  phone  Vision  system  of  providing  pay- 
as-you-see  television  service  reveals  either  serious  distortion  or 
complete  misunderstanding  of  facts  on  the  part  of  General  Sarnoff. 

"phone  vision  receivers  do  not,  as  he  alleges,  limit  their 
service  only  to  those  who  would  agree  to  pay  for  programs.  They 
provide  for  full,  free  reception  of  all  sponsored  or  sustaining 
programs  with  commercials  that  are  broadcast  free  to  owners  of 
ordinary  television  sets.  In  addition,  they  will  enable  set  owners 
to  see  in  their  own  homes,  for  a  modest  fee,  new  movie's,  theatrical 
spectacles,  championship  sports  events,  and  other  costly  features 
that  can  otherwise  be  seen  only  after  paying  admission  at  the  box 
office, 

"First  run  movies,  Broadway  plays,  and  similar  features 
never  have,  and  never  will,  be  available  to  the  public  free  of 
charge.  Their  production  cost,  which  sometimes  exceeds  one  million 
dollars  per  hour,  is  so  great  that  advertising  sponsors  can  never 
pay  the  bill, 

"In  1925  General  Sarnoff  predicted  that  commercial  tele¬ 
vision  would  be  here  within  five  years,  but  television  has  languish¬ 
ed  for  more  than  twenty  years  because  of  inadequate  programming. 
Prominent  national  advertisers  are  dropping  television  today  because 
the  high  cost  of  producing  successful  programs  is  beyond  their  bud¬ 
get.  phone  vision,  by  moving  the  theater  into  the  home  along  with 
other  television,  provides  the  two  great  services  needed  to  make 
the  video  art  a  commercial  success  and  a  service  of  incalculable 
value  to  the  public.  The  phone  vision  set  of  the  future,  which  will 
provide  free  and  pay-as-you~see  television,  will  cost  no  more  than 
ordinary,  one-service  television  sets  do  today. " 

-  4  - 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/17/47 


The  large  6  by  8  feet  television  pictures  originating  in 
New  York  and  beamed  to  Atlantic  City  by  way  of  Philadelphia,  pro¬ 
vided  the  first  public  demonstration  of  television  transmission 
over  such  a  great  distance  by  means  of  super- frequency  microwave 
television  relays,  according  to  T.  A.  Smith  of  RCA. 

"It  demonstrates",  he  said,  "that  microwave  equipment  can 
be  employed  for  transmission  of  television  programs  over  long  dis¬ 
tances,  and  points  the  way  toward  expansion  of  television  program 
service  to  reach  a  greater  number  of  people.  " 

The  demonstrations  were  presented  cooperatively  by  the 
American  Broadcasting  Company,  the  National  Broadcasting  Company, 
their  affiliates  WFIL-TV  and  WpTZ,  and  the  RCA  Victor  Division  of 
the  Radio  Corporation  of  America. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

FCC  AID  SOUGHT  IN  FM  DUPLICATION;  DILLARD  NEW  FM  PRESIDENT 

The  main  result  of  the  first  annual  convention  of  the  FM 
Association  in  New  York  last  week  was  to  put  up  a  proposal  to  the 
Federal  Communications  Commission  that  the  Commission  prohibit  net¬ 
work  agreements  with  radio  stations  that  prevent  the  simultaneous 
broadcasts  on  both  standard  and  FM  stations.  A  preamble  to  the 
resolution  was  "that  the  advancement  of  FM  at  this  time  will  best 
be  accomplished  by  the  duplication  of  regular  network  programs  over 
FM  facilities.  ” 

In  another  resolution  the  convention  asked  the  manufactur¬ 
ers  to  turn  out  more  low-priced  FM  sets  and  in  still  another  urged 
FM  station  operators  to  give  better  programs,  to  use  more  live 
talent  and  not  depend  so  much  on  recordings. 

Everett  L.  Dillard,  General  Manager  of  WaSH-FM,  Washington, 
D.  C. ,  was  elected  president  of  the  F M  Association  for  1947-48; 

William  E.  Ware,  KSWI,  Omaha,  Neb.,  Vice-President;  E.  J.  Hodel, 

WCFC,  Beckley,  W.  Va.,  Secretary,  andTliomas  F.  McNulty,  WMCP,  Balti¬ 
more,  Treasurer.  J.  N.  Bailey  was  re-elected  Executive  Director. 

A  lifetime  membership  scroll  was  presented  to  MaJ.  Edwin 
H.  Armstrong,  inventor  of  FM.  Also  scrolls  for  outstanding  contri¬ 
butions  to  FM  to  Jack  Gould,  Radio  Editor  of  the  New  York  Times  and 
others. 


Evidently  speaking  from  personal  experience,  Representa¬ 
tive  Carroll  D.  Kearns,  ( R) ,  of  Pennsylvania,  who  so  recently  had 
Jamies  C.  petrillo,  President  of  the  American  Federation  of  Musicians 
on  the  green  carpet  in  Washington,  advised  the  convention  that  they 
had  better  try  to  come  to  some  kind  of  an  agreement  with  the  tough 
little  music  leader  rather  than  to  endeavor  to  settle  it  by  an  Ant 
of  Congress. 


-  5  - 


•\ 


He  ini  Radio  News  Service 


9/17/47 


Representative  Kearns,  who  is  Chairman  of  a  House  Labor 
sub-committee,  went  so  far  as  to  say  he  believed  Mr.  petrillo  want¬ 
ed  to  do  the  right  thing  for  FM.  "Arbitration  and  negotiation  are 
the  only  solution  of  the  controversy",  the  Pennsylvania  solon  con¬ 
cluded.  "You’ll  never  be  able  to  legislate  this  situation  away.  " 

Acting  upon  the  suggestion  of  Mr.  Kearns  the  FMA  Directors 
later  appointed  the  following  committee  which  it  is  expected  will 
meet  in  the  Congressman’s  office  at  an  early  date: 

Everett  Dillard,  Chairmen;  Raymond  F.  Kohn,  WFMZ,  Allen¬ 
town,  Pa. ;  Morris  S.  Novik,  of  the  Unity  Broadcasting  System;  Marion 
Claire,  WGN3,  Chicago,  and  J.  N.  Bailey  of  FMA. 

Paul  A.  Walker,  Vice-Chairman  of  the  Federal  Communica¬ 
tions  Commission  was  of  the  opinion  that  FM  network  program  duplica¬ 
tion  was  not  essential  and  likewise  suggested  that  the  FM  stations 
originate  their  own  programs. 

"Duplication  of  programs  will  be  a  substantial  aid  to.FM", 
Commissioner  Walker  said.  "However,  I  do  not  agree  that  the  whole 
future  of  FM  turns  on  duplication.  I  think  that  FM  broadcasters 
should  proceed  to  develop  programs  specifically  for  FM.  There  is 
plenty  of  room  for  new  types  of  programs  and  especially  for  programs 
peculiarly  suited  to  high  fidelity  transmission.  " 

"Already,  sixty  million  Americans  live  within  the  range 
of  one  or  more  FM  stations.  Note  that  I  say  'live  within  the 
range*.  I  do  not  say  that  they  are  all  hearing  FM.  Because  of  the 
lack  of  FM  sets,  very  few  of  them  are  able  to  hear  the  new  FM  sta¬ 
tions.  All  in  all,  comparatively  few  people  know  whet  those  myster¬ 
ious  initials  *  FM  *  signify.  For  too  many  folks,  FM  is  still  in  the 
category  of  the  sea  serpent  and  the  flying  saucer.*  *  *  * 

"I  am  glad  to  have  the  opportunity  afforded  by  this  con¬ 
vention  to  re-affirm  the  enthusiasm  of  the  Commission  for  this  new 
type  of  broadcasting  and  to  call  attention  again  to  its  merits. 

"The  main  advantages  of  FM  are  as  follows: 

"First:  FM  is  easier  on  the  ears.  It  is  virtually  free 

from  static  and  other  electrical  noise,  from  interference  and  fading. 

"Second:  FM  has  high  fidelity.  Its  range  brings  all  the 

tones  and  over-tones  of  every  instrument  in  the  orchestra. 

"Third:  FM  means  more  service.  Most  communities  will  be 

able  to  have  more  FM  stations  than  they  now  have  AM  stations.  Gen¬ 
erally,  the  stations  in  a  given  community  will  be  similar  in  the 
coverage  they  provide.  That  means  that  a  station  cannot  rely  on 
superior  po-wer,  as  at  present,  to  compete  for  an  audience.  It  will 
have  to  compete  on  the  basis  of  excellence  of  programs.  Here  we  have 
true  equality  of  opportunity. 


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"The  opportunity  for  more  stations  also  means  that  new 
people  with  new  ideas  can  come  into  the  field.  It  means  a  greater 
possibility  of  catering  to  minority  tastes  and  of  expanding  discus¬ 
sion  of  controversial  issues. 

Declaring  that  radio  manufacturers  already  have  invested 
millions  of  dollars  in  FM  and  have  incurred  heavy  losses  in  develop¬ 
ing  FM  receivers,  Mr.  Max  F.  Relcom,  President  of  the  Radio  Manu¬ 
facturers1  Association,  said: 

,rThe  manufacturers  who  comprise  RMA  are  just  as  much  inter¬ 
ested  as  the  broadcasters  in  FMA  in  making  FM  broadcasting  a  going, 
paying  business.  n 

Set  manufacturers  have  produced  more  than  700,000  AM-FM 
receivers  since  the  war,  Mr.  Balcom  said,  and  the  rate  of  production 
is  expected  to  increase  sharply  during  the  remaining  months  of  1947 
due  to  the  development  of  reasonably  priced  FM  table  models  by  an 
increasing  number  of  manufacturers. 

Mr.  Balcom  said  that,  although  all  production  has  declined 
during  the  Summer  vacation  period,  there  is  no  reason  to  believe 
that  the  RICA  estimate  of  approximately  two  million  FM  receivers  in 
1947  will  not  be  reached. 

Mr.  Balcom  warned  FM  broadcasters,  however,  that  it  will 
take  several  years  to  build  up  an  FM  audience  comparable  to  that  now 
in  the  AM  field. 


xxxxxxxxxx 

WIND,  CHICAGO,  PLANS  EXPANDING  BASE3ALL  TO  FIVE  STATES 

WIND,  Chicago,  of  which  Ralph  Atlass  is  President,  plans 
to  expand  its  Midwest  Baseball  Network  for  the  1948  season.  Mr. 
Atlass  has  invited  50  stations  in  Illinois,  Michigan,  Wisconsin, 
Indiana  and  Iowa  to  attend  a  meeting  at  the  Ritz  hotel,  Atlantic 
City  this  week  to  discuss  coop  participation  in  the  network,  whose 
prime  concern  is  the  broadcasting  of  the  Chicago  Cubs  games. 

The  MBN  heretofore  was  managed  on  the  outside.  Next 
season  it  will  be  operated  directly  by  WIND,  which  locally  broadcasts 
the  games  for  Old  Gold  aid  Walgreen. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

An  adaptation  of  the  walkie-talkie  made  its  appearance  this 
week  at  the  opening  of  the  United  Nations  General  Assembly  in  New 
York.  Some  1800  earphones  and  receiving  sets,  about  twice  the  size 
of  a  cigarette  pack,  were  placed  in  the  U,  N.  Hall  for  delegates, 
press  and  public. 

The  innovation  made  it  possible  to  move  about  freely  about 
the  building  without  missing  a  word  of  the  proceedings. 

XXXXXXXXX 
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3LUE  BOOK  IS  STILL  BLUE,  FCC  CHAIRMAN  ADMONISHES  BROADCASTERS 


In  what  was  considered  one  of  the  most  important  speeches 
at  the  Broadcasters'  convention  at  Atlantic  City  -  that  of  Charles  R. 
Denny,  Chairman  of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  at  Atlantic 
City  today  (Wednesday,  September  17)  -  Mr,  Denny,  referring  to  the 
first  year's  operation  of  the  highly  controversial  "Blue  Book"  rules 
declared: 


"Let's  take  a  look  at  the  Blue  Book.  Its  cover  is  still 
solid  blue.  It  has  not  been  bleached.  The  Blue  Book  stands  as 
fundamental  FCC  policy. 

"Those  who  have  suggested  that  the  color  of  the  Blue  Book 
is  fading  point  to  the  fact  that  the  Commission  after  hearings  has 
renewed  the  licenses  of  six  stations  that  received  prominent  mention 
in  the  Blue  Book.  Two  things,  however,  are  overlooked. 

"First,  they  fail  to  take  into  account  the  real  improvement 
made  by  the  stations  in  question  and  their  recognition,  which  we  are 
convinced  is  sincere,  of  their  public  service  responsibility. 

"Second,  they  misconstrue  the  purpose  of  the  Blue  Book. 

The  Blue  Book  was  issued  to  make  known  to  the  public  and  the  industry 
some  of  the  basic  questions  which  we  feel  should  be  taken  into  account 
in  developing  program  service  in  the  public  interest.  It  was  issued 
to  aid  broadcasters  in  developing  a  consciousness  of  public  service 
responsibility.  In  addition,  we  wanted  to  indicate  the  general  out¬ 
line  of  our  licensing  policy.  The  Blue  Book  was  never  intended  to 
lay  down  by  rigid  rule  the  precise  conditions  under  which  licenses 
would  be  revoked.  For  improvements  in  the  broadcast  field  must  come 
in  the  first  instance  from  the  broadcasters  themselves,  from  their 
appreciation  of  their  own  responsibilities  to  meet  public  require¬ 
ments.  Only  when  there  is  continued  and  flagrant  disregard  of  these 
responsibilities  does  the  licensing  authority  come  into  play. 

"In  the  final  analysis  the  success  of  this  industry  and 
the  success  of  the  governmental  licensing  authority  are  not  to  be 
measured  by  the  number  of  licenses  issued  or  by  the  number  of  licens¬ 
es  revoked. 

"The  important  thing  in  broadcasting  is  what  comes  out  of 
the  loudspeaker.  The  renewal  applications  and  other  reports  receiv¬ 
ed  since  the  publication  of  the  Blue  Book  give  evidence  that  you  are 
oecoming  increasingly  aware  of  your  responsibilities  to  the  public. 
Here  in  Atlantic  City  you  are  considering  a  detailed  code  by  which 
you  hope  to  raise  the  standards  of  your  industry.  In  this  objective 
we  wish  you  every  success.  There  is  still  much  to  be  done.  Ameri¬ 
can  radio  is  still  too  commercial. " 

With  regard  to  television,  Chairman  Denny  said: 


-  8  - 


Helnl  Radio  News  Service 


9/17/47 


"Where  do  we  go  from  here?  Are  only  41  American  cities 
to  have  a  monopoly  on  television?  pictures  of  television  sets  are 
appearing  in  magazines  that  circulate  throughout  the  land.  Soon  the 
teood  people  of  Memphis,  Birmingham,  Kansas  City,  Denver,  Atlantic 
City,  and  a  hundred  other  cities  are  going  to  start  asking  -  'When 
do  we  get  television?' 

"It  is  our  clear  duty  --  yours  and  mine  —  to  do  everything 
within  our  power  to  see  that  this  new  service  reaches  the  maximum 
number  of  American  communities.  *  *  *  * 

"Suppose  it  could  be  arranged  for  you  to  enter  television 
simply  by  installing  a  transmitter  and  an  antenna.  Suppose  instead 
of  building  studios  and  buying  cameras  and  a  film  pickup  for  the 
origination  of  programs  of  your  own,  you  could,  initially  at  least, 
rely  upon  a  network  for  program  service?  In  those  areas  which  today 
are  not  traversed  by  coaxial  cables  and  where  no  network  television 
service  is  available,  suppose  one  station  in  a  large  community  could 
do  the  programming  and  distribute  it  to  transmitters  that  you  would 
build  in  smaller  adjacent  communities  and  link  to  the  key  transmitter 
by  radio  relpy?  Several  stations  in  different  communities  might 
share  a  common  central  studio  or  a  mobile  pickup  unit  and  move  it 
from  place  to  place  for  the  origination  of  programs. 

"Thus,  little  clusters  of  television  stations  might  be 
spawned  in  various  parts  of  the  country.  Then  as  the  coaxials  and 
microwave  relays  reach  across  the  nation  these  little  networks  might 
be  joined  together  and  a  nationwide  television  service  would  emerge. 
In  this  way  television  might  be  nursed  through  the  tender  period 
of  its  infancy.  " 

Turning  to  FM  the  speaker  said: 

"Here  may  be  a  clew  to  what  the  FM  service  of  the  future 
will  look  like.  We  may  in  the  not  too  distant  future  have  FM  sets 
with,  say,  10  push  buttons  which  could  be  marked  as  follows:  the 
first  four  would  bring  you  on  FM  the  programs  of  the  established 
nationwide  networks.  (I  know  that  this  depends  on  Mr.  Petrillo  and 
the  four  networks  getting  together,  but  I  hope  this  can  be  done  in 
the  near  future.)  The  next  two  buttons  might  bring  you  via  FM  the 
programs  of  established  independents. 

"But  the  last  four  buttons  could  bring  you  something  entire¬ 
ly  new  to  the  aural  radio  art.  For  example,  Button  7  might  be  label¬ 
led  'classical  music'  and  bring  you  an  FM  network  Joined  together  by 
direct  radio  pickup.  Any  hour  of  the  da.y  or  night  when  you  want  good 
music  you  would  only  have  to  push  this  button  to  get  it. 

"Button  8  might  be  labelled  'dance  music'  and  would  bring 
you  popular  tunes  at  any  hour  of  the  day  or  night  by  means  of  a  par¬ 
allel  FM  network. 


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''Button  9  might  be  labelled  ‘Features’  and  could  bring 
women1 s  programs,  children’s  programs  and  other  special  attractions. 

’’The  last  button  might  be  simply  marked  ’news'  and  by 
pushing  it  you  would  get  a  15-minute  news  summary  at  any  hour  of  the 
day.  M 

XXXXXXXXXXX 

OVERSEAS  BROADCAST  SUBSIDIES  URGED,  ALSO  "FREEDOM -TO  LOOK” 

Justin  Miller,  president  of  the  National  Association  of 
Broadcasters,  addressing  the  Association’s  Convention  at  Atlantic 
City  Tuesday,  said  that  private  industry  could  not  be  expected  to 
finance  international  broadcasting  operations  that  are  not  on  a  pay¬ 
ing  basis. 


"The  only  alternative,  therefore,  to  Government  broadcast¬ 
ing",  he  said,  "is  a  Government  subsidy  which  would  put  us  on  an 
equal  footing  with  the  Government-owned  and  subsidized  systems  of 
other  countries." 


Mr.  Miller  recalled  the  proposal  of  3rig.  Gen.  David 
Sarnoff,  head  of  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America,  that  the  United 
Nations  Economic  and  Social  Committee  set  up  a  network  of  United 
Nations  radio  transmitter  at  strategic  points  around  the  globe. 

This  referred  to  an  address  made  last  Friday  in  Chicago  to 
the  United  Nations  Educational  Scientific  end  Cultural  Organization 
by  General  Sarnoff  proposing  the  establishment  of  a  United  Nations 
network  of  radio  and  television  stations  throughout  the  world.  He 
said  with  the  advent  of  television  "Freedom  to  Look"  had  become  as 
important  as  "Freedom  to  listen". 

"If  the  principle  is  right,  and  if  the  job  needs  to  be 
done,  it  is  clear,  it  seems  to  me,  that  the  cost  is  relatively  un¬ 
important",  the  speaker,  who  was  introduced  by  Assistant  Secretary 
of  State  William  Benton,  said.  "Even  if  the  cost  of  operating  such 
a  world-wide  system  should  prove  to  be  as  much  as  $50,000,000  a  year, 
that  figure  is  far  less  than  the  cost  of  one  modern  battleship;  it  is 
a  mere  fraction  of  what  a  single  nation  spends  yearly  for  its  arma¬ 
ment.  It  is  less  than  one- fifth  the  amount  that  was  spent  on  fight¬ 
ing  in  a  single  day  during  the  last  World  War.  " 

XXXXXXXXXX 

TAFT-HARTLEY  LAW  MAY  STOP  PETRILLO  MUSICIANS  FROM  MAKING  DISKS 

The  American  Federation  of  Musicians,  American  Federation 
of  Labor,  may  prohibit  its  members  from  making  new  phonograph  record¬ 
ings  after  December  as  a  result  of  the  Taft-Hartley  Law’s  restric¬ 
tions  on  the  use  of  royalties  end  welfare  funds  paid  to  unions,  a 
dispatch  from  Chicago  states. 


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He ini  Radio  News  Service 


9/17/47 


The  ABA  executive  board,  headed  by  James  C.  Petrillo,  was 
disposed  to  take  such  action  at  its  meeting  in  Chicago  last  week. 

At  the  last  minute,  it  was  learned,  it  was  agreed  to  defer  the  deci¬ 
sion  until  a  meeting  in  Chicago  on  October  13.  The  sixty-day  notice 
of  the  termination  of  the  contract  in  December  required  by  the  Taft- 
Hartley  Law  can  be  given  at  that  time.  Union  leaders  agreed  there 
was  no  advantage  in  making  their  decision  earlier. 

The  union’s  income  from  the  sale  of  recordings  is  reported 
to  be  about  SL, 000, 000  a  year.  The  rate  ranges  from  one- quarter  of 
a  cent  per  record  upwards,  depending  on  the  price  of  the  record. 

XXXXXXXX 

NEW  47- STORY  DALLAS  HOTEL  TO  HAVE  TV  IN  EVERY  ROOM 

The  Lacy-potter  Television  Broadcasting  Co.,  of  Dallas, 
Texas,  has  been  granted  a  construction  permit  by  the  Federal  Communi¬ 
cations  Commission  for  a  new  commercial  television  station;  Channel 
No.  3,  180-186  Me;  power  (visual)  35  kw.  (aural)  18.5  kw. 

This  carries  with  it  a  proposal  to  install  a  television 
set  in  every  room  of  the  new  47- story  hotel  now  being  built  in  Dallas. 
Also  the  new  station  will  have  a  489  foot  antenna  mast,  less  than 
100  feet  as  tall  as  the  Vfeshington  Monument. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

RESPONDENT  DISAPPEARS  IN  LUXOR  RADIO  CASE 

The  Federal  Trade  Commission  closed  without  prejudice  the 
case  growing  out  of  its  complaint  charging  Harold  Kirschbaum,  trad¬ 
ing  as  Luxor  Radio  Manufacturing  Co.  end  Consolidated  Radio  and 
Television  Co. ,  New  York,  with  misrepresentation  in  the  sale  of  radio 
and  television  sets  and  other  electrical  and  mechanical  devices. 

The  case  was  closed,  with  the  concurrence  of  all  the  Com¬ 
missioners,  on  motion  of  counsel  supporting  the  complaint,  in  which 
it  was  set  forth  that  the  whereabouts  of  the  respondent  cannot  be 
ascertained  despite  diligent  search  and  inquiry.  The  Commission 
reserved  the  right  to  reopen  the  proceeding  should  future  circum¬ 
stances  and  the  public  interest  so  require. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


miTISH  PLAN  BIG  POST-WAR  REOPENING  OF  "RADI OLYMPIA" 

The  1947  "Radiolympia ",  Britain’s  fifteenth  National  Radio 
Exhibition,  opens  the  week  after  next  (September  29)  in  its  pre-war 
home  at  Olympia,  London.  This  big  ten-day  exhibition,  described  as 
I^Pageant  of  British  radio",  will  be  the  first  to  be  held  since  the 
v°n.p0f  1959  Was  abruPtly  brought  to  a  premature  end  by  the 

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Trade  buyers  from  all  over  the  world  are  attending.  There 
will  be  a  large  display  of  British  short-wave  receivers  incorporat¬ 
ing  many  war-time  lessons  and  equally  suitable  for  all  climates.  A 
booklet  called  "British  Radio  for  the  World"  which  has  been  issued  by 
Britain's  Radio  Industry  Council  to  mark  the  jubilee  of  the  British 
radio  industry,  the  silver  jubilee  of  British  broadcasting  and  the 
tenth  anniversary  of  the  first  television  transmissions  to  viewers 
in  Great  Britain,  makes  the  point  that  the  British  radio  industry 
has  already  increased  its  exports  four- fold  as  compared  with  pre-war 
day  s . 

XXXXXXXX 

NAVY  PLANS  $1,000,000  CALIFORNIA  BOMB,  QUAKE  PROOF,  STATION 

A  new  million  dollar  high-power  radio  station  is  being 
built  by  the  Navy  at  Dixon,  Calif.  The  station  will  be  built  of  re¬ 
inforced  concrete  and  be  "blast  and  earthquake  resistant",  the  Navy 
said. 


The  high  frequency  station  will  feature  flexibility  of 
equipment  and  e xpansion  for  future  needs. 

The  Navy  did  not  specify  the  extent  of  the  blast  the  sta¬ 
tion  is  designed  to  withstand,  but  all  naval  installations  now  being 
constructed  are  checked  by  a  board  of  experts  on  the  effects  of  atomic 
bomb  blasts. 


xxxxxxxxxxx 

D.C.  TEACHER  WINS  PRIZE  FOR  HISTORY  "SOAP  OPERA"  IDEA 

Today's  daytime  dramas  -  "soap  operas"  -  can  make  American 
history  fascinating  and  sharpen  critical  standards  of  High  School 
students,  according  to  a  D.C.  teacher  whose  plan  for  using  radio  in 
the  classroom  won  her  a  $25  prize  in  Washington,  D.  C. 

She  is  Mrs.  Elizabeth  L.  Chase,  English  teacher  at  Calvin 
Coolidge  High  School.  Her  winning  idea  was  titled  "Using  Soap  Opera 
to  Kick-Off  a  Unit  in  American  Literature".  It  was  judged  best  of 
ell  plans  submitted  by  200  members  (mostly  teachers)  of  the  two-week 
WT0P-C3S  Radio  Workshop  sponsored  by  the  District  Public  Schools, 
^TOP,  and  the  Columbia  Broadcasting  System. 

Dr.  Hobart  M.  Corning,  Superintendet  of  Washington  schools, 
presented  the  check  to  Mrs.  Chase. 

Mrs.  Chase's  prize-winning  outline  for  using  radio  in  the 
classroom  utilizes  radio  literature  "as  a  hook  between  the  past  and 
the  present  which  encourages  students  to  make  thoughtful  and  helpful 
criticism  of  radio  literature  today",  she  said. 

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•  •  • 

SCISSORS  AND  PASTE  : : : 

•  •  • 

.  _ _  ______  •  •  • 


Editorial  a  On  The  Air 

(^Washington  Post  ,r)"~ 

It  was  because  the  granting  of  a  license  to  use  a  radio 
frequency  was  a  special  privilege  that  the  Federal  Communications 
Commission  was  justified  in  insisting  that  the  licensee  present  con¬ 
flicting  points  of  view,  especially  in  respect  of  political  issues, 
impartially.  "The  broadcaster",  the  agency  declared,  "cannot  be  an 
advocate. " 

But  new  developments  in  electronics  have  vastly  expanded 
the  radio  spectrum.  In  the  two  years  since  the  end  of  the  war,  the 
FCC  has  issued  as  many  licenses  for  new  stations  as  it  issued  during 
the  whole  of  the  preceding  decade.  Frequency  modulation  is  making 
many  additional  channels  available .  Television  is  beginning  to  add 
still  more.  It  is  not  yet  true  that  the  supply  of  frequencies  ex¬ 
ceeds  the  demand  -  at  least  in  some  of  the  large  communities  where 
broadcasting  is  most  profitable.  But  that  time  seems  certain  to 
come  -  no  doubt  soon.  And  it  is  in  anticipation  of  it  that  the  FCC 
has  announced  that  it  will  hold  hearings  in  January  to  determine 
whether  its  policy  forbidding  broadcasters  to  be  advocates  should 
be  change  d. 

Of  course,  when  every  applicant  for  a  radio  license  can 
be  granted  one,  the  role  of  the  FCC  will  be  greatly  simplified.  It 
will  stand  in  relation  to  broadcasters  in  much  the  position  of  the 
post  Office  Department  in  relation  to  newspaper  publishers;  licenses, 
like  second-class  mailing  privileges,  can  be  extended  automatically 
to  all  who  meet  certain  simple  standards  of  decency.  And  in  that 
happy  time,  broadcasters,  we  think,  should  be  quite  as  free  as  pub¬ 
lishers  to  advocate  any  cause  or  candidate  they  favor.  Radio  sta¬ 
tions  are  already  nearly  as  numerous  as  daily  newspapers.  Their 
numbers  ought  to  assure  that  diversity  which  is  the  best  possible 
protection  of  the  public  interest.  We  fancy,  in  any  case,  that  the 
development  of  editorial  opinion  on  the  air  ought  to  come  gradually  - 
that  it  has  been  coming  gradually  for  a  long  time  and  is  already  far 
advanced.  Broadcasters  need  not  be  too  impatient  for  complete  free¬ 
dom.  Their  concern  must  be  to  use  it  well. 


Re d  (Ink)  Menace 

( "^Broadcasting*) 

Only  a  little  over  a  half  a  year  ago,  in  March,  Llewellyn 
White,  working  under  a  $100,000  grant  from  publisher  Henry  Luce 
(Time,  Life,  Fortune)  and  the  U.  of  Chicago  to  the  Commission  on 
Freedom  of  the  Press,  offered  The  American  Radio  to  the  public.*  *  * 
Among  Mr,  White’s  acknowledgments  was  an  interesting  para¬ 
graph:  "The  Federal  Communications  Commissioners  aid  their  staff, 
particularly  Edward  Brecher,  of  the  legal  department,  were  especially 
helpful  in  making  material  available.  " 


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At  the  time  Mr.  White’s  book  was  published,  Mr.  Brecher  had 
left  the  FCC  to  manage  WQQW,  Washington,  a  station  largely  financed 
by  stockholders  inspired  by  the  ideas  set  forth  in  the  Blue  Book, 
by  '’Radio’s  Second  Chance'’,  a  book  by  Charles  A.  Siepmann,  ex-FCC 
employee,  and  Mr.  White. 

They  were  fine-sounding  theories.  But  they  lacked  some¬ 
thing,  They  just  wouldn’t  work.  Practical  broadcasters  recognized 
that  lack.  This  magazine  pointed  it  out  repeatedly. 

WQQW  was  the  testing  ground.  Although  it  was  managed  by 
the  man  whose  ideas  were  incorporated  in  the  Blue  Book  and  The 
.American  Radio,  the  station  drips  red  ink.  And  Edward  M.  Brecher 
is  no  longer  its  general  manager. 

Y/Q,QW  will  be  sold  if  a  buyer  can  be  found.  Otherwise  there 
is  talk  of  operating  on  a  public  contribution  basis.  Whatever  the 
final  disposition,  it  appears  certain  the  station  will  not  be  oper¬ 
ated  successfully  on  the  pinkish  theories  of  Mr.  Brecher. 


Sen.  Lodge’s  Complaint  Cited  in  "Voice  of  America’*  Argument 

( M The  Washington  Post”)" 

Every  returning  traveler  from  Europe  will  bear  out  Senator 
Lodge’s  observation  of  the  ’’shocking”  distortions  of  the  truth  about 
America  that  are  current  in  Europe.  The  motives  back  of  our  aid  are 
everywhere  assailed.  Even  in  high  quarters  the  reason  for  the 
Marshall  initiative  is  thought  of  in  terms  either  of  saving  our 
export  skins  or  of  beginning  a  new  American  empire.  As  Senator 
Lodge  says,  "everything  we  do  is  twisted”. 

Nothing,  in  our  opinion,  testifies  as  convincingly  to  the 
success  of  Soviet  propaganda,  as  this  stage  of  things.  However, 
there  are  other  circumstances  which  account  for  the  misrepresenta¬ 
tions  of  which  the  Senator  speaks.  There  is  a  basic  resentment 
among  many  Britons  and  Frenchmen  over  the  hermorrhage  in  their 
national  power  which  resulted  from  the  conflict  with  Hitler.  Added 
to  this  is  the  usual  bitterness  that  comes  from  dependence.  A  cred¬ 
itor  is  never  a  hero  to  his  debtor,  as  Britain  found  out  when  it  was 
the  world’s  greatest  creditor.  As  the  Emperor  Francis  Josef  observed, 
when  reminded  of  a  debt  to  Russia  for  help  in  suppressing  a  Hungar¬ 
ian  revolt,  ”We  shall  astonish  our  allies  by  our  ingratitude.  ” 

It  seems  to  us  that  Senator  Lodge’s  finding  constitutes  a 
convincing  argument  for  the  strengthening  of  the  Voice  of  America 
pro  grain. 


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•  • 
i  • 

TRADE  NOTES  :: 

t  • 
«  • 


Assistant  Secretary  of  Labor  Phil  Hannah  announced  last 
week,  according  to  an  Associated  press  dispatch  from  Cincinnati,  that 
he  had  resip3ned,  effective  "when  William  Green  (president  of  the 
.American  Federation  of  Labor  and  Labor  Secretary  Schwellenbach  sel¬ 
ect  a  man  from  the  ranks  of  labor  to  take  my  place.  11 

Wouldn’t  it  almost  stop  the  show  at  Atlantic  City  if 
Chairman  Denny  of  the  Federal  Communication  Commission  announced 
that  he  had  resigned,  effective  "when  President  Truman  and  Justin 
Miller,  president  of  the  National  Association  of  Broadcasting,  sel¬ 
ect  a  man  from  the  ranks  of  the  broadcasters  to  take  my  place"? 


Whether  or  not  to  broadcast  the  new  song  "Have  a  Heart  - 
Taf t-Hartley "  is  going  to  be  a  headache  for  station  managers.  After 
"Florence  the  Girl  Disk  Jockey"  played  it  over  WGAY,  Washington, 
Tuesday  for  the  first  time,  she  said:  "If  you  don’t  see  me  here 
tomorrow  you’ll  know  the  reason  why.’" 


Emerson  Radio  &  phonograph  Corporation  and  Subsidiaries  - 
Thirty-nine  weeks  to  Aug.  2:  Net  profit,  after  $500,000  inventory 
reserve  aid  $1,102,974  for  taxes,  was  $1,535,197,  equal  to  $3,96  a 
share,  compared  with  net  of  $767,192,  or  $1.92  a  share  earned  in 
thirty-nine  weeks  to  Aug.  3,  1946,  when  $577,168  was  deducted  for 
taxes. 


Representative  Carroll  D.  Kearns  ( R) ,  of  Pennsylvania, 
Chairman  of  the  House  Labor  subcommittee,  has  advised  broadcasters 
that  James  C.  Petrillo,  President  of  the  American  Federation  of  Labor, 
has  agreed  to  meet  Sept.  20  in  Chicago  with  officials  of  the  Nation¬ 
al  Education  Association  School  Administration  Department  to  sign  an 
agreement  permitting  young  musicians  in  schools  and  colleges  to  broad¬ 
cast.  The  agreement  will  go  into  effect  immediately  after  the  sign¬ 
ing,  Representative  Kearns  said. 

International  Detrola  Corporation  and  Subsidiaries  -  Nine 
months  to  July  31:  Net  profit  $1,13*9,908,  equal  to  93  cents  a  share, 
compared  with  $950,701  or  73  cents  a  share  for  similar  period  a  year 
oefore,  which  included  $769,025  non-recurring  profit  on  sale  of 
California  plant;  sales,  $53,028,516,  against  $25,790,436.  Included 
for  the  first  time  are  operations  of  Universal  Cooler  Company  of 
Canada,  Ltd.  ,  which  on  Feb.  3  became  a  wholly  owned  subsidiary. 


A  story  tracing  the  progress  of  the  American  Broadcasting 
Company,  since  its  purchase  in  1943  by  Edward  J.  Noble,  appears  in 
the  "Business"  section  of  the  September  15  issue  of  Newsweek.  A 
picture  of  Mr.  Noble,  Chairman  of  ABC,  and  Mark  Woods,  President, 
illustrates  the  Newsweek  article. 


Due  to  greater  mass  production  and  the  absorption  of  devel¬ 
opment  costs  by  heavy  sales  throughout  the  nation,  price  reductions 
up  to  $430  have  been  made  by  the  United  States  Television  Mfg.  Corp. 

XXXXXXXXX 

-  15  - 


Founded  in  1924 


HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 


Radio  —  Television 


FM  —  Communications 


2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 


Washington  8,  D.  C. 


Robert  D.  Heinl,  Editor 


Lv 


TV 


•/a.U.TS Dq£ 


NATIONAL  w-j  , 


INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  SEPTEMBER  24,  1947 


Small  Audience  Greets  Petrillo’s  Free  Washington  Concert.. . ...1 

Col.  McCormick  Calls  ECC  ’’Commissars’”  Threat  To  Free  Radio . ,.3 

NAB  To  Be  Under  New  Code  Feb.  1;  Denny  Defends  Press  Story. . 5 

Tam  Craven  Re-Elected  N.A.B.  Director;  Has  Unique  Record. . 6 

Washington  Soon  To  Have  As  Many  Television  Stations  As  NYC . ..7 

Petrillo  Signs  School  Music  Agreement  -  Interlochen  Excluded. .....  9 

Monthly  Radio  Set  Output  Increases;  TV  From  10  To  12,000. . 10 

Auto  visitors’  Radio  Curbs  Relaxed  Between  Canada  and  U.S . 10 

Benton  Reported  Finally  Out  At  State  Department...., . 11 

New  Movie  Theatr.e  Owners’  Assn,  To  Keep  Tab  On  Television. . 11 

NBC  To  Test  Radio  In  Directing  Television  Productions . 12 

New  Method  Of  Predicting  Sunspots  Aids  Radio  Forecasts . 12 

Scissors  And  Paste  . . . . . . . . 13 

Trade  Notes . . . . . 15 


No.  1793 


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September  24,  1947 


SMALL  AUDIENCE  GREETS  PETRILLO ’S  FREE  WASHINGTON  CONCERT 


Attendance  was  very  disappointing  at  the  grand  free  con¬ 
cert  given  to  the  citizens  of  Washington,  D.  C.  by  James  C.  Petrillo 
and  Local  161,  the  Washington  Musicians  Union.  It  took  place  at  the 
Watergate  in  Washington  on  the  banks  of  the  Potomac  River  in  a 
beautiful  setting  at  the  foot  of  the  Lincoln  Memorial.  Preparations 
had  been  made  for  a  capacity  audience  but  the  comparatively  few  who 
attended  were  almost  lost  in  the  gloom  of  empty  seats. 

Costs  of  the  concert  at  the  Watergate,  which  is  operated 
by  the  Government,  were  met  from  the  much  talked  of  recording  royalty 
relief  fund  of  the  American  Federation  of  Musicians  derived  from  the 
manufacture  and  sale  of  recordings  and  radio  transcriptions,  which 
are  now  being  used  by  Mr.  Petrillo  to  further  the  cause  of  music 
throughout  the  country  and  to  give  work  to  unemployed  and  disabled 
musicians. 


The  Washington  local  musicians  union’s  share  was  $15,000. 
Some  of  it  has  been  spent  by  sending  dance  orchestras  to  city  play¬ 
grounds  and  smaller  groups  of  musicians  to  the  Veterans  Administra¬ 
tion  hospitals.  The  Watergate  concert  was  to  be  the  big  final 
splurge.  A  payroll  of  $1,572  was  distributed  for  the  concert  among 
the  instrumentalists  comprising  a  64-piece  band  organized  for  the 
event.  Each  player  received  $24  -  $12  for  the  concert  at  symphony 
rates  and  $12  for  going  through  the  program  twice  at  a  rehearsal. 

Seats  were  available  for  5,550  persons  with  standing  room 
for  several  thousand  more  but  Edward  Kelly,  Assistant  Superintendent 
of  the  National  Capital  Park  and  Planning  Commission  in  charge  of 
Watergate  told  this  writer  that  only  1,200  attended  Mr.  Petrillo’ s 
concert . 

Commenting  upon  the  poor  turnout,  George  Kennedy  wrote  in 
the  Vvrashington  Evening  Star: 

’’About  $1,500  worth  of  music  was  given  away  last  night  at 
the  Water  Gate  with  few  takers.  The  donors  were  James  C.  Petrillo, 
of  the  American  Federation  of  Musicians  and  the  ’Washington  Music¬ 
ians’  Union. 

’’The  listeners,  scattered  among  the  seats  for  thousands  on 
the  banks  of  the  Potomac,  apparently  included  a  large  proportion  of 
fellow  union  members  and  the  families  of  the  performers. 

’’Paul  J.  Schwartz,  President  of  Local  161,  explained  after 
the  concert  that  none  of  the  money  that  came  from  the  national  union 
could  be  used  for  promotion  of  the  concert,  and  that  his  local  had 
no  funds. 


”’If  people  knew  what  we  were  giving  away  tonight*,  he 
said,  ’there  would  be  more  here.’ 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


’’Leon  Brusiloff,  local  theatre  leader  who  conducted  the 
improvised  Water  Gate  orchestra  said  that,  if  the  experiment  ever 
is  repeated,  it  would  be  well  to  let  some  organization  sell  tickets 
for  charitable  purposes. 

’’’They  could  keep  all  the  money  and  they  would  bring  a 
bigger  crowd  here”,  Brusiloff  said.” 

Music  critic  Paul  Hume  expressed  this  opinion  in  the 
Washington  Post; 

”We  doubt  seriously  that  the  cause  of  music  was  furthered 
in  any  way  by  the  concert,  since  the  selections  were  of  the  genre 
heard  regularly  over  the  average  radio  program;  popular  in  nature, 
and  less  than  featherweight.  But  we  do  highly  approve  of  the  gen¬ 
erous  use  made  of  the  fund  both  here  and  in  other  cities.” 

’’The  audience  was  small,  a  circumstance  traceable  directly 
to  inadequate  publicity,  there  having  been  no  admission  fee”,  Glen 
Dillard  Gunn  wrote  in  the  Washington  Times-Herald.  ’’Evidently  the 
local  union  has  much  to  learn  about  concert  promotion.” 

Mr.  Gunn  was  undoubtedly  correct  but  inauiry  into  this 
angle  brought  the  response  that  there  was  a  clause  in  the  Petrillo 
fund  allowance  that  no  money  was  to  be  spent  for  advertising  or 
promotion. 


’’When  we  first  planned  this,  we  got  together  a  committee 
of  the  leading  people  in  music  in  the  Capital”,  Mr.  Schwartz  was 
quoted  as  saying.  '’They  suggested  a  program  for  a  symphony  orchestra. 
The  national  office  had  to  pass  on  it.  They  asked,  ’What’s  in  this 
for  the  dance  band  boys?’  So  we  decided  to  give  a  concert  with  the 
kind  of  music  most  people  like.’  It’s  too  bad  we  didn’t  have  the 
money  to  let  them  know  about  it.” 

Unquestionably  the  newspapers  and  broadcasting  stations 
would  have  given  advance  notice  of  the  event  if  they  had  been  kept 
informed,  but  one  of  the  local  music  critics  remarked  to  the  writer, 
’’Union  musicians  don’t  do  anything  without  being  paid  and  wouldn’t 
even  take  the  trouble  of  trying  to  secure  a  little  free  publicity 
for  themselves  because  no  funds  had  been  provided  for  that  purpose. 

’’Also  the  local  union  musicians  were  not  any  too  happy 
about  the  way  the  musicians  and  soloists  to  be  paid  were  selected. 

The  main  committee  composed  of  critics  and  other  musical  people  met 
only  twice  in  the  beginning  but  after  that  the  thing  was  run  by  a 
little  clique  who  evidently  favored  their  own  people  instead  of  the 
needy  and  disabled  musicians  for  which  the  fund  was  supposedly 
intended.  If  the  needy  had  secured  the  work,  they  could  have  at 
least  paid  their  union  back  dues.  Instead,  prosperous  musicians 
and  soloists  were  chosen.  This  part  of  it  was  even  more  secret 
than  the  advance  publicity.” 

The  critic  above  mentioned  expressed  the  opinion  that  it 
would  have  been  better  for  Mr.  Petrillo  to  have  given  the  needy 


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9/24/47 


and  disabled  union  musicians  the  money  outright. 

The  Petrillo  broadcast  recording  relief  fund  now  reported 
to  be  in  the  millions  is  administered  exclusively  by  the  AFM  union. 
Some  of  the  money  is  being  distributed  to  the  local  unions  and  used 
for  such  purposes  as  subsidizing  symphonic  music  and  public  concerts. 
The  declared  purpose  is  to  develop  the  use  of  "live  music”  and  pro¬ 
vide  employment  for  musicians.  However,  such  welfare  funds  become 
subject  to  the  new  Taft-Eartley  law  when  current  contracts  expire 
January  1st.  The  law  stipulates  that  such  payments  must  be  held  in 
trust  for  the  purpose  of  paying  only  for  medical  or  hospital  care, 
pensions,  compensation  for  injuries  resulting  from  occupational 
activity,  unemployment  benefits,  life  insurance,  etc. 

Faced  with  this,  Petrillo  and  his  associates  are  reported 
to  have  almost  decided  to  advise  disk  companies  that  their  members 
will  not  make  records  after  December  31st.  Definite  action  will 
depend  upon  a  musicians  union  meeting  to  be  held  in  Chicago 
October  15th. 


XXXXXXXXXXXXX 

COL.  Me  CORN I CK  CALLS  FCC  "COMMISSARS’”  THREAT  TO  FREE  RADIO 

One  of  the  very  few  broadcasters  who  dares  to  say  exactly 
what  he  thinks  of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  is  Col. 

Robert  R.  McCormick,  publisher  of  the  Chicago  Tribune  and  operator 
of  Station  WGN •  Describing  threats  to  American  freedoms  at  a  luncheon 
of  the  Constitution  Day  Committee  celebrating  the  160th  anniversary 
of  the  nation’s  basic  law  in  Chicago,  he  declared  the  sources  of 
danger  were:  An  oversized,  aristrocatic  army,  the  Federal  Communica¬ 
tions  Commission,  the  Postmaster  General,  the  Department  of  Justice, 
certain  members  of  Congress  and  a  group  of  crackpot  professors. 

In  his  reference  to  the  Federal  Communications  Commission 
and  broadcasting,  Colonel  McCormick  said: 

”No  one  has  alleged  that  freedom  of  speech,  as  guaranteed 
in  the  1st  amendment,  has  been  affected  by  speech  over  instruments. 

No  one  has  Questioned  the  right  to  speak  freely  over  the  telephone 
or  into  the  phonograph. 

’’The  interference  with  freedom  of  speech  over  the  air  is 
not  based  upon  the  large  audience  reached.  Indeed  at  the  time  the 
1st  amendment  was  adopted,  speaking  trumpets  were  in  use  and  halls 
were  designed  for  their  acoustical  effects. 

”No,  the  interference  with  freedom  of  speech  over  the 
air  is  based,  as  one  might  have  expected,  on  the  doctrine  of  commun¬ 
ism,  accepted  in  principle  by  Congress  and  administered,  as  is  com¬ 
munism,  for  the  benefit  of  the  single  party  system, 

’’When  broadcasting  became  known,  far-seeing,  speculative, 
or  sc ient if ically-minded  men  bought  broadcasting  instruments  as 


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He  ini  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


centuries  ago  men  bought  minting  presses  or,  perhaps  a  better  pre¬ 
cedent,  as  men  settled  on  the  public  domain.  Some  less  far-sighted 
men  bought  out  the  first  users.  Others,  oblivious  of  the  rights  of 
the  owners,  infringed  upon  their  wave  lengths.  Confusion  resulted. 

’’The  matter  should  have  been  left  to  the  courts  to  con¬ 
strue  under  the  common  law,  but  Congress  chose  communism  on  the 
theory  that  the  people  who  did  buy  transmitting  instruments  and 
devoted  their  time  and  money  to  broadcasting  had  no  rights  to  the 
airways,  and  that  those  who  did  not  devote  a  cent  or  a  minute  to 
broadcasting  had  all  the  rights,  and  that  a  commission  of  commissars 
should  administer  them. 

”It  is  as  though  commissars  should  take  and  distribute  the 
farmers’  grain  which,  by  the  way,  is  also  in  the  wind. 

"The  communist  form  of  government  has  not  prevented  the 
limitation  of  program  production  to  four  chains,  as  compared  with 
thousands  of  newspapers  and  scores  of  magazines.  As  a  matter  of 
fact,  time  has  shown  that  there  are  more  wave  lengths  than  there  are 
organizations  able  to  produce  acceptable  programs.  That  political 
influence  is  feared  by  chains  and  stations  alike  is  attested  by  the 
fact  that  there  is  no  excess  to  which  administration  supporters  may 
not  go  and  do  go,  while  chains  and  stations  refuse  to  accept  the 
most  parliamentary  of  anti-administration  speakers,  even  when  they 
are  sponsored  and  the  time  paid  for,  and  that  free  time  on  the  air 
must  be  given  for  administration  political  speakers  and  withheld 
from  anti-administration  political  speeches.  This  is  the  price  we 
pay  for  putting  communism  into  our  form  of  government  and  denying 
freedom  of  speech  to  the  radio.” 

Charging  censorship  in  the  movies,  Colonel  McCormick  said: 

”How  viciously  it  can  be  administered”,  he  said,  ”we  re¬ 
cently  have  learned  when  the  movies  were  forced  to  support  Communism 
in  particular  to  put  on  that  utterly  false  play,  ’Mission  to  Moscow’ 

”As  you  know,  the  well-censored  New  York  stage  is  predom¬ 
inantly  anti-American.” 

’’Subversive  influences”,  he  said,  ’’have  called  for  paper 
allocation.  Such  allocation  would  put  in  the  hands  of  the  commiss¬ 
ars  powers  similar  to  those  exercised  by  radio  commissars. 

’’Paper  would  be  allocated  to  administration  supporters 
and  withheld  from  administration  opponents.” 

XXXXXXXXXX 

The  Federal  Communications  Commission  last  week  adopted 
an  Order  which  reinstated  and  extended,  or  simply  extended,  as  the 
case  might  be,  all  Temporary  Limited  Radiotelegraph  Second  Class 
Operator  Licenses  which  have  expired  or  would  otherwise  expire  be¬ 
fore  July  1,  1948.  The  purpose  of  this  Commission  action  is  to  en¬ 
able  holders  of  this  class  of  license  to  help  meet  the  existing 
shortage  of  licensed  radiotelegraph  operations. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


4 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


NAB  TO  BE  UNDER  NEW  CODS  FEB.  1;  DENNY  DEFENDS  PRESS  STORY 


Although  there  may  still  be  a  stormy  road  ahead  and  plenty 
of  hot  discussions,  everything  now  seems  to  be  all  set  for  the  new 
code  adopted  by  the  National  Association  of  Broadcasters’  Convention 
at  Atlantic  City  to  be  in  operation  February  1st.  The  final  work 
of  the  NAB  Board  of  Directors  last  week  was  to  order  the  Code  as 
adopted  by  the  convention  mailed  to  the  entire  membership  asking  for 
any  further  criticism  or  suggestions  which  must  be  in  hand  not  later 
than  November  1st. 

Then  the  controversial  features  of  the  Code  will  be  revis¬ 
ed  for  final  action  to  be  taken  by  the  Board.  President  Justin 
Miller  will  keep  in  touch  with  Chairman  Charles  R.  Denny,  Chairman 
of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  with  regard  to  any  new 
developments. 

And  the  mention  of  Chairman  Denny  brings  to  mind  one  of 
the  most  unusual  incidents  from  a  newspaper  standpoint  that  happen¬ 
ed  during  the  convention.  It  came  about  through  a  small-sized 
sensation  being  created  by  Jack  Gould,  Radio  Editor  of  the  New  York 
Times  Quoting  Chairman  Denny  as  saying  code  compliance  might  be  a 
proper  subject  for  FCC  inquiry  in  acting  upon  station  license  renew¬ 
als.  It  was  generally  thought  seeing  what  a  storm  this  had  kicked 
up  that  Mr.  Denny,  following  the  grand  old  Washington  custom,  might 
hedge  and  charge  that  he  had  been  misquoted. 

However,  the  FCC  Chairman  not  only  stood  by  his  guns  but 
in  a  way  this  writer  has  never  seen  in  his  long  years  of  experience, 
Denny  stood  by  the  reporter.  Furthermore,  he  accorded  the  addition¬ 
al  consideration  to  Mr.  Gould  of  having  George  0.  Gillingham,  FCC’s 
star  press-man,  immediately  send  the  explanation  out  as  an  addition 
to  his  set  speech  which  had  previously  been  sent  to  press  and  radio. 

Addressing  the  great  convention  at  Atlantic  City  and 
digressing  from  his  prepared  speech,  Chairman  Denny  referred  to  the 
newspaper  story  as  follows: 

"The  discussion  seems  to  have  gotten  away  from  the  point 
whether  the  proposed  code  is  good  or  bad.  Instead,  there  is  a  lot 
of  speculation  about  what  I  did  or  didn’t  say  in  response  to  a  ques¬ 
tion  from  Jack  Gould  of  the  New  York  Times.  Let’s  read  Jack’s 
article: 

’’Jack  asked  me  what  I  thought  of  the  code.  Now  I  quote 
from  the  article:  ’Charles  R.  Denny,  Jr.,  Chairman  of  the  Federal 
Communications  Commission,  said  he  had  not  read  the  code,  and, 
accordingly  was  not  prepared  to  express  an  opinion  on  its  contents.’ 

"Then  Jack  asked,  ’Suppose  they  adopt  a  code  and  then  a 
few  stations  don’t  live  up  to  it?’ 

"Now  I  quote  again  from  his  article:  ’At  the  same  time  he 
expressed  the  opinion  that  it  would  be  an  appropriate  subject  of 


5 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


"inquiry"  by  the  F.C.C.  if  a  station  sought  a  renewal  of  its  license, 
yet  had  not  adhered  to  the  minimum  standards  adopted  by  the  industry 
as  a  whole. 1  ’I  think  we  ought  to  at  least  ask  about  itT,  Mr. 

Denny  remarked.1 

"The  article  is  correct.  Every  word  of  it  and  every 
comma  of  it.  Jack  is  a  good  reporter. 

"The  Commission  is  not  going  to  tell  you  what  kind  of  a 
code  you  should  adopt.  That  is  your  problem.  Personally,  I  be¬ 
lieve  that  some  corrective  action  is  needed  in  your  industry  and  a 
good  sound  code  would  be  a  forward  step." 

The  new  Code  was  endorsed  not  only  by  Niles  Trammell, 
President  of  the  National  Broadcasting  Company,  who  was  first  under 
the  wire  and  made  a  real  fight  for  it,  but  by  the  heads  of  all  four 
networks. 

Mr.  Trammell  said: 

"It  is  my  hope  and  feeling  that  this  new  code  will  rid 
our  industry  of  many  of  the  abuses  for  which  broadcasters  have  been 
criticized  and  will  enable  us  to  further  improve  our  service  to 
both  the  listener  and  advertiser." 

Dr.  Frank  Stanton,  President  of  the  Columbia  Broadcasting 
System,  said:  "CBS  fully  endorses  the  standards  of  practice  adopted 
by  NAB  and  pledges  its  unqualified  support  of  this  forward  step  In 
the  improvement  of  radio  programs  throughout  the  country.  It  is 
heartening  to  see  this  general  industry-wide  acceptance  of  the  pro¬ 
posal  outlined  by  William  S.  Paley,  Chairman  of  the  Board  of  CBS, 
at  the  NAB  convention  last  October." 

"We  believe  that  the  new  code  of  standards  will  be  a  blue¬ 
print  for  the  further  improvement  of  American  radio,  he  concluded. 

Mark  Woods,  ABC  president,  said:  "We  have  always  been  in 
favor  of  a  code.  We  are  studying  in  detail  the  ramifications  of 
the  present  code,  and  we  will  consult  with  our  affiliated  stations 
and  make  a  detailed  report  on  our  position  at  a  later  time." 

Edgar  Kodak,  President  of  the  Mutual  Broadcasting  System, 
said,  "The  industry  is  making  progress." 

X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X 

TAM  CRAVEN  RE-ELECTED  N.A.B.  DIRECTOR;  HAS  UNIQUE  RECORD 

Commander  T.A.M.  Craven,  of  Washington,  who  was  re-elected 
a  Director  of  the  medium  size  station  division  of  the  National 
Association  of  Broadcasters  at  Atlantic  City,  has  in  addition  to  his 
personal  popularity  a  record  unique  among  broadcasters  because  (a) 
basically  he  is  one  of  the  best  known  radio  engineers  in  the  country; 
(b)  he  served  with  distinction  first  as  Chief  Engineer  of  the 


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9/24/47 


Federal  Communications  Commission  and  later  as  a  member  of  the  Com¬ 
mission  itself;  (c)  is  now  Vice-President  of  the  Cowles  Broadcasting 
Company  and  (d)  is  also  General  Manager  of  WOL,  the  Cowles  station 
in  Washington. 


XXXXXXXX 

WASHINGTON  SOON  TO  HAVE  AS  MANY  TELEVISION  STATIONS  AS  NYC 

Washington,  itself  destined  to  be  one  of  the  video  capit¬ 
als  of  the  world,  on  or  about  October  1st  will  add  its  third  tele¬ 
vision  station  and  then  will  have  the  same  number  of  television 
stations  as  are  now  operating  in  New  York  City.  Furthermore,  a 
fourth  Washington  station  now  under  construction  will  begin  tele¬ 
casting  next  Spring. 

The  National  Capital’s  newest  station  which  will  make  its 
bow  within  the  next  few  weeks  will  be  WMAL-T7,  owned  and  operated  by 
the  Washington  Evening  Star.  The  fourth  Washington  station,  sched¬ 
uled  to  start  early  in  1948,  will  be  WOIC,  owned  and  operated  by  the 
Bamberger  Service,  Inc.,  in  New  York  City. 

are 

The  two  stations  now  operating  in  Washington  /  WNBW,  of 
the  National  Broadcasting  Company  and  WTTG,  operated  by  A.  B.  Dumont 
and  managed  by  Leslie  Arries.  The  three  New  York  City  stations  are 
WCBW,  Columbia  Broadcasting  System,  WNBT,  National  Broadcasting 
Company  and  WABD,  Dumont. 

WMAL-TV’ s  transmitter  in  Washington  will  be  at  the  American 
University  in  the  northwest  section  of  the  city  about  a  mile  above 
the  Washington  Cathedral.  Studios  will  be  downtown  in  the  Common¬ 
wealth  Building  on  K  Street,  a  half  a  block  west  of  the  Statler.  In 
the  same  building  is  RCA  Communications,  office  of  F.  P.  Guthrie, 
Assistant  Vice-President,  and  next  door  Station  WOL  skippered  by 
Commander  T.A.M.  Craven.  This  will  bring  together  a  group  of  old 
griends  as  Xenneth  Berkeley,  General  Manager  of  WMAL  and  WMAL-TV , 
is  also  a  veteran  in  the  business  and  was  associated  with  Mr.  Guthrie 
for  years  in  the  development  of  WRC. 

Mr.  Berkeley  has  just  announced  that  effective  October 
1st,  Burke  Crotty,  for  more  than  eight  years  Director  of  Special 
Events  for  NBC  television  in  New  York,  will  take  over  as  Director 
of  Television  for  WMAL-TV,  in  Washington.  Mr.  Crotty,  who  is  36 
years  old,  has  quite  a  record  in  radio  and  television,  having 
produced  the  first  Army  and  Navy  game,  first  television  coverage  of 
Republican  Convention  and  the  Louis-Conn  fight,  etc, 

WMAL  TV  will  telecast  on  Channel  7  (174  to  180  megacucles) 
using  a  new  5-kilowatt  RCA  transmitter  -  the  first  unit  to  be  built 
for  the  higher  commercial  frecuencies. 

Plans  also  call  for  the  installation  of  a  two-section  RCA 
Pylon  antenna  for  the  Star’ s  FM  station,  WKAL-FM.  The  Super  Turn¬ 
stile  will  be  mounted  atop  the  Pylon.  By  using  RCA’s  recently 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


announced  diplexing  system,  it  will  be  possible  to  broadcast  FM  and 
television  picture  and  sound  simultaneously  from  the  same  antenna 
system. 

Mr.  Berkeley  has  already  signed  up  the  Washington  Redskin 
pro  football  games.  Likewise  those  of  Georgetown  and  George 
Washington.  WMAL-TV  will  also  be  used  to  train  American  University 
students  who  are  signed  up  for  the  college’s  new  radio-video  cur¬ 
riculum,  under  the  direction  of  WMAL’s  Special  Events  Director.  The 
University  is  committed  to  produce  around  52  hours  of  television 
programs  a  year. 

News  came  only  this  week  that  the  Bamberger  Broadcasting 
Service  had  concluded  a  contract  with  RCA  for  the  purchase  of  a 
5  KW  television  transmitter  for  delivery  to  its  Washington,  D.  C. 
television  station  WOIC ,  and  a  contract  with  the  General  Electric 
Company  for  a  similar  transmitter  for  WOR-TV,  which  will  also  be  the 
fourth  station  in  New  York  City. 

WOIC’s  new  transmitter,  RCA  Type  TT-5A,  is  scheduled  for 
delivery  in  March,  1948,  and  will  be  installed  on  the  highest  point 
in  Washington,  at  40th  and  Brandywine  Streets,  about  a  mile  north  of 
the  Washington  Cathedral,  where  the  elevation  is  412  feet  above  sea 
level.  An  RCA  6-bay  Super  Turnstile  television  transmitting  antenna 
mounted  on  a  300  foot  tower,  used  in  conjunction  with  the  TT-5A 
will  give  the  transmitter  an  effective  output  power  of  approximately 
35-thousand  watts,  providing  a  signal  which  will  cover  a  40  mile 
radius.  It  will  operate  in  channel  9,  which  is  in  the  182-192  mega¬ 
cycle  band. 

The  RCA  TT-5A  has  already  been  delivered  to  WNBW  in 
Washington;  XSD,  St.  Louis,  WEIL,  Philadelphia;  WTMJ,  Milwaukee; 

WLW ,  Cincinnati;  WBZ,  Boston;  and  XOB,  Albuquerque.  Further  del¬ 
iveries  of  the  RCA  transmitter  are  being  made  at  the  rate  of  three 
a  month. 

Cities  to  Eceive  the  TT-5A  in  addition  to  the  ones  men¬ 
tioned  above,  include  New  York,  Chicago,  Cleveland,  Minneapolis, 
Baltimore,  Los  Angeles,  Toledo,  Newark,  Buffalo,  Dallas,  Detroit, 
and  St.  Paul. 

I.  R.  Poppele,  Vice-President  of  WOR,  New  York  and  Presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Television  Broadcasters’  Association,  is  likewise  in 
charge  of  the  construction  of  WOIC,  the  Bamberger  station  in  V7ash- 
ington,  which  is  expected  to  represent  an  expenditure  of  approxi¬ 
mately  a  half  a  million  dollars.'  NBC’s  WNBW  has  cost  about  the  same. 

Mr.  Poppele  in  a  speech  in  Philadelphia  last  week  predict¬ 
ed  that  by  next  June  there  would  be  500,000  television  sets  in  oper¬ 
ation  throughout  the  country, 

xxxxxxxxxx 


8 


He ini  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


PETR ILL 0  SIGNS  SCHOOL  MUSIC  AGREEMENT  -  INTERLOCHEN  EXCLUDED 


James  C.  Petrillo,  President  of  the  American  Federation  of 
Musicians,  last  Monday  in  Chicago  signed  a  ’’code  of  ethics”  with 
two  educational  institutions  for  performances  not  in  rivalry  with 
the  Musicians  Union.  However,  the  National  Music  Camp  of  Dr. 

Joseph  E.  Maddy  at  Interlochen,  whose  broadcasts  Petrillo  put  his 
foot  down  on  five  years  ago  and  which  indirectly  was  the  cause  of 
Petrillo  signing  on  the  dotted  line  this  week,  was  not  included. 

Mr.  Petrillo,  in  discussing  the  code  to  which  Luther  A. 
Richman,  President  of  the  Music  Educators  National  Conference,  and 
Harold  C.  Hunt,  President  of  the  American  School  Administrators, 
were  also  a  party,  declared  that  it  did  not  cover  Dr.  Maddy’ s  camp 
because  the  camp  ”is  a  commercial  institution”. 

The  signers  of  the  code  agreed,  however,  that  Dr.  Maddy’ s 
camp  might  receive  a  hearing.  They  were  told  that  the  camp  was 
sanctioned  by  the  University  of  Michigan. 

Dr.  Maddy  said  at  the  University  of  Michigan,  where  he  is 
a  professor  in  the  Music  Department,  that  of  the  1,160  young  people 
who  enrolled  in  the  camp  last  Summer  550  were  University  of  Michigan 
students  receiving  credit  for  their  studies.  Their  teachers  were 
paid  by  the  University  and  the  library,  which  is  used  by  the  entire 
camp,  was  established  by  the  University,  he  added. 

He  said  he  would  probably  seek  a  hearing  before  the  com¬ 
mittee  of  the  three  signatory  organizations. 

Mr.  Richman  said  the  agreement  will  bring  ’’greater  under¬ 
standing  between  the  amateur  and  professional  musician  which  should 
result  in  greater  leeway  for  the  amateur.  On  the  other  hand,  it 
will  mean  less  leeway  for  music  schools  which  have  over-stepped  the 
boundary  between  music  education  and  the  entertainment  field.” 

United  States  Attorney  Otto  Kerner ,  Jr.,  said  in  Chicago 
last  Sunday  night  that  the  Government’s  Lea  Act  prosecution  of  James 
C.  Petrillo,  woon  will  be  reopened. 

Mr.  Kerner  said  an  amended  criminal  information  against 
Petrillo  is  being  prepared  by  the  Attorney  General’s  office  in 
Washington. 

The  amendment  will  make  minor  changes  in  the  original  in¬ 
formation  to  conform  to  the  June  23  Supreme  Court  decision  holding 
the  Lea  Act  constitution,  Mr,  Kerner  continued. 

The  original  information  accused  Petrillo  of  violating 
the  so-called  Petrillo  law  in  support  of  a  demand  that  the  station 
hire  three  more  record  librarians.  WAAF  said  the  librarians  were 
not  needed. 

XXXXXXXX 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


y/24/47 


MONTHLY  RADIO  SET  OUTPUT  INCREASES;  TV  FROM  10  TO  12,000 


Radio  and  television  receiver  production  in  August  began 
to  move  upwards  toward  an  expected  heavy  output  in  the  Fall  months 
as  manufacturers  produced  a  total  of  1,265,835  sets  of  all  types  for 
the  month,  the  Radio  Manufacturers’  Association  reports. 

The  August  output  brings  to  11,031,935  the  number  of 
receivers  manufactured  by  member- companies  in  eight  months  of  1947 
and  registers  the  first  increase  in  monthly  production  since  the 
peak  was  reached  last  April. 

Television  receiver  production  in  August  showed  a  gain 
over  July  and  established  a  new  record  for  the  year,  reaching 
12,283  sets  as  against  10,007  for  the  five-week  period  in  July. 

The  previous  monthly  record  was  set  in  June  when  11,484  television 
sets  were  produced. 

August’s  television  output  was  as  follows:  radio  table 
models,  7,984;  direct  viewing  radio  consoles,  2,181;  projection- 
type  radio  consoles,  92;  direct  viewing  radio-phonograph  combina¬ 
tions,  2,008,  and  18  projection-type  radio-phonograph  combinations. 

FM-AM  receivers  produced  by  RMA  member-companies  in  August 
totalled  72,014  as  compared  with  70,649  in  the  July  period. 

RMA  member- companies  also  manufactured  in  August  273,380 
aubomobile  radios,  149,150  portable  radios  and  26,080  table  model 
battery  sets. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

AUTO  VISITORS’  RADIO  CURBS  RELAXED  BETWEEN  CANADA  AND  U.S. 

Interim  arrangements  have  been  made  by  the  Federal  Com¬ 
munications  Commission  between  this  country  and  the  Dominion  of 
Canada  under  which  mobile  radio  transmitting  equipment  licensed  by 
either  Government  can  enter  either  country  provided  that  the  trans¬ 
mitter  is  sealed  by  customs  officials  to  prevent  its  operation  in 
the  country  visited. 

After  sealing  the  eauipment  at  the  border  and  noting  that 
fact  on  a  permit,  the  vehicle  will  be  allowed  to  proceed.  On  leaving 
the  visited  country,  the  seal  will  be  removed  by  the  customs  officer 
at  the  port  of  exit.  The  permit  holder  is  warned,  however,  that 
should  the  seal  be  found  to  have  been  broken  or  removed,  the  vehicle 
will  be  subject  to  seizure. 

The  laws  of  both  the  United  States  and  Canada  prohibit 
alien  operation  of  transmitting  stations.  Heretofore,  Canadian 
visitors  to  the  United  States  carrying  such  equipment  in  their 
care  have  been  warned  at  the  border  that  to  use  the  same  in  this 
country  would  be  a  violation  of  our  laws.  In  the  case  of  Canada, 
visitors  from  the  United  States  were  required  to  remove  such  equip¬ 
ment  before  entering  its  territory. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


10 


He ini  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


BENTON  RETORTED  FINALLY  OUT  AT  STATE  DEPARTIrENT 


William  Benton,  Assistant  Secretary  of  State  in  charge  of 
information  and  cultural  affairs,  and  storm  center  of  the  ’’Voice  of 
America”,  has  finally  submitted  his  resignation  to  President  Truman, 
according  to  latest  Washington  reports. 

Secretary  Benton  has  been  a  subject  for  controversy  ever 
since  he  was  appointed  two  years  ago.  He  was  hardest  hit  when  his 
’’Voice  of  America”  program  struck  a  snag  in  Congress  which  last 
Tune  axed  the  appropriations.  It  was  said  that  had  Benton  been 
removed  at  that  time  the  ’’Voice  of  America”  would  have  fared  much 
better. 


Mr.  Benton  was  a  former  partner  of  ex-Price  Administrator 
Chester  Bowles  of  the  advertising  agency  of  Benton  and  Bowles. 

IX  X  X  X  XIX  X  X 

NEW  MOVIE  THEATRE  OWNERS'  ASSN.  TO  KEEP  TAB  ON  TELEVISION 

A  new  group,  Theatre  Owners  of  America,  formed  from  the 
Motion  Picture  Theatre  Owners’  Association,  and  the  American  Theatres 
Association  meeting  in  Washington,  D.  C.  last  week  created  among 
other  committees  a  group  to  map  ways  to  combat  television  and  to 
fight  the  license  tax  imposed  on  theatres  by  the  American  Society 
of  Composers. 

Paul  Raibourn,  Paramount  Pictures  Trice-President  in  Charge 
of  Television,  told  a  subcommittee  which  set  up  a  standing  committee 
to  keep  tab  on  television  developments,  that  Paramount  has  devel¬ 
oped  a  ’’quick-freeze”  system  of  putting  television  on  movie  film. 

He  predicted  that  within  a  year  there  would  be  enough 
television  sets  to  give  half  the  Nation’s  population  access  to  the 
new  form  of  entertainment. 

Calling  for  a  fight  ’’all  along  the  line”,  Spyros  P. 

Skouras,  20th  Century  Fox  President,  told  the  exhibitors,  who  re¬ 
present  some  10,000  theatres  with  85  per  cent  of  the  Nation’s  movie 
seats,  that  Hollywood  faces  ”its  greatest  crisis  and  challenge”. 

Mr.  Skouras  charged  that  American  critics  had  "ridiculed” 
the  industry’s  "creative  minds”.  They  also  "smeared  the  orivate 
lives  of  our  people”  and  made  fun  of  "the  eccentricities  of  the 
producers .” 


XXX  XXX  X  X  X  X  X  X 


11 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


NBC  TO  TEST  RADIO  IN  DIRECT  INC  TELEVISION  PRODUCTIONS 


The  Federal  Commiini  cat  ions  Commission  last  week  granted 
the  National  Broadcasting  Company  an  experimental  license  to  be 
used  for  testing  radio  direction  in  producing  television  plays  at 
its  New  York  studio.  Stage  directors,  equipped  with  lightweight 
receivers,  will  receive  instructions  from  the  control  booth. 

Heretofore  this  communication  has  been  available  only 
through  the  use  of  headsets  and  connecting  long  cords  plugged  into 
various  outlets  about  the  stage.  These  trailing  wires  not  only 
impeded  the  movements  of  the  directors  but  became  entangled  in 
other  equipment.  They  often  became  disconnected  inadvertently  and 
disrupted  contact  and  production.  Since  the  proposed  radio  system 
will  be  experimented  within  a  shielded  television  studio,  it  is  not 
expected  to  cause  outside  interference.  It  will  use  Industrial, 
Scientific  and  Medical  freouencies  which  are  available  for  assign¬ 
ment  to  low-power  radio  communication.  Use  of  this  band  for  such 
a  purpose  will  tend  to  reduce  the  demand  for  other  frequencies  for 
convenience  communication. 

XXXXXXXXXXXX 

NEW  METHOD  OF  PREDICTING  SUNSPOTS  AIDS  RADIO  FORECASTS 

The  prediction  of  solar  activity,  which  greatly  affects 
radio  communication  and  is  evidenced  by  spots  on  the  sun,  has  been 
advanced  through  the  application  of  a  new  statistical  method,  by 
A.  G.  McNish  and  Virginia  Lincoln  of  the  National  Bureau  of  Stand¬ 
ards.  The  new  technic,  depending  on  available  sunspot  data  for  a 
number  of  previous  11-year  cycles,  has  a  sounder  scientific  basis 
than  former  methods  of  prediction.  Moreover,  it  is  expected  to  be 
applicable  to  a  wide  variety  of  cyclical  phenomena,  such  as  long¬ 
term  weather  variations  and  climatic  changes.*  *  * 

The  sunspot  number  is  obtained  by  counting  the  number  of 
sunspot  groups,  multiplying  by  10,  and  adding  to  the  result  the  num¬ 
ber  of  individual  sunspots  in  each  group.  This  statistical  conven¬ 
tion  was  adopted  at  the  Zurich  Observatory  in  the  middle  of  the  nine¬ 
teenth  century,  and  since  that  time  has  been  standard  all  over  the 
world. 

Daily  ’’soundings”  of  the  ionosphere  are  taken  all  over  the 
world  by  an  international  network  of  58  ionosphere  stations,  14  of 
which  are  operated  or  supported  by  the  Bureau.  These  daily  sound¬ 
ings  measure  the  critical  frequency  (the  limiting  frequency  for  re¬ 
flections  back  to  the  earth),  absorption  of  radio  energy  ’an  indica¬ 
tion  of  the  power  required  to  transmit  a  given  frequency  over  a  par¬ 
ticular  distance),  and  the  heights  of  the  various  layers  (determined 
through  the  use  of  radar-like  echo  equipment).  The  sunspot  predic¬ 
tions  are  correlated  with  this  information  to  provide  the  working 
data  used  at  the  Bureau  in  predicting  radio  propagation  character 
istics. 


(Continued  at  bottom  of  page  16) 


12  - 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


SCISSORS  AND  PASTE 


Trammell  Credited  With  Leading  Fight  For  Code 

(lack  Gould  in  "New  York  Times” ) 

The  convention  of  the  National  Association  of  Broadcasters 
demonstrated  the  extraordinary  difficulties  that  lie  ahead  in  curb¬ 
ing  excessive  commercialism  on  the  air. 

Irrespective  of  the  details  of  a  code  of  standards,  over 
which  there  is  bound  to  be  controversy  for  many  days  to  come,  the 
broadcasters  divided  into  two  broad  groups. 

The  first  group  comprised  broadcasters  admittedly  led  by 
the  older  and  more  economically  secure  network  affiliates,  who  have 
come  to  the  realization  that  listener  irritation  over  too  many 
"plugs”  is  real  and  demands  a  prompt  remedy. 

The  second  group  is  dominated  by  independent  outlets,  many 
of  them  forced  to  contend  with  extremely  competitive  local  condi¬ 
tions,  which  regard  the  one-minute  "spot"  commercial  as  almost  a  way 
of  life.  These  stations  constitute  the  real  barrier  to  any  reform 
movement . 

host  active  in  the  pro-code  faction  here  undoubtedly  was 
Niles  Trammell,  NBC  President  who  at  Atlantic  City  occupied  the  role 
held  by  William  S.  Paley,  CBS  Board  Chairman,  at  the  NAB  convention 
a  year  ago  in  Chicago. 

It  was  Mr.  Trammell  who  provided  leadership  in  the  true 
sense  of  the  word.  Not  only  was  he  wholeheartedly  in  favor  of  a 
code  but  he  crusaded  for  it  among  convention  delegates  with  a  fervor 
rarely  seen  at  NAB  gatherings. 

Other  stations  noted  that  Mr.  Trammell  could  afford  to  take 
such  a  stand  because  his  network  is  the  most  prosperous.  That,  of 
course,  is  undeniably  true,  but  it  does  not  detract  from  the  fact 
that  Mr.  Trammell  also  seemed  most  aware  of  the  urgency  of  the  prob¬ 
lem  presented  by  commercials. 


Newspaper  vs.  Radio  News 

("Editor  and  Publisher") 

Alan  Barth  of  the  Washington  Newspaper  Guild  writing  in 
the  Guild  Reporter,  says,  among  other  things:  "And  we  might  as  well 
face  it:  radio  is  now  the  primary  news  source  for  most  Americans.  .  . 
"What’s  the  source  of  that  statement?  It  is  probably  the  now-anc¬ 
ient  (1945)  poll  conducted  in  Denver  and  much  publicized  by  press 
critics. 

If  he  had  wanted  to,  Barth  could  have  auoted  the  more 
recent  Iowa  poll  (June  1947)  which  reveals  that  Iowans  think  news¬ 
papers  are  more  fair  than  radio  in  news  presentation  and  they  rely 
more  on  newspapers  than  radio  informing  their  opinions.  There  have 
been  other  polls  disproving  the  Denver  findings.  But  they  didn’t 
fit  into  Barth’s  argument. 


13 


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He ini  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


Ma.j .  Armstrong,  Father  of  FM,  Sees  Cheery  Future 

(Sonia  Stein  in  "Washington  Post”) 

Despite  the  fact  FU  broadcasting  suffered  another  setoack 
this  week  when  under  Petrillo’s  orders  the  Washington  and  Rochester 
locals  of  the  American  Federation  of  Musicians  banned  the  broadcast¬ 
ing  of  live  music  from  either  of  the  two  origination  points  of  the 
Continental  FM  network,  the  father  of  FM  broadcasting  thinks  the 
musical  hitch  is  trivial  compared  to  other  obstacles  FM  has  weathered. 

Addressing  members  of  the  National  Association  of  Broad¬ 
casters  in  Atlantic  City  following  a  demonstration  of  FM  broadcast¬ 
ing  beamed  from  station  to  station  over  long  distances,  Maj.  Edwin 
Armstrong,  discoverer  of  the  staticless,  high  fidelity  system  of 
broadcasting,  cited  some  of  the  serious  obstacles  already  overcome. 

He  mentioned  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America  as  one  of  the  early 
hindrances,  since  the  company  had  been  given  "an  exclusive  preview 
of  the  FM  invention  (in  1934)  and  turned  down  the  opportunity  of  mak¬ 
ing  it  available  to  the  American  public." 

In  an  informal  session  afterward,  Armstrong  said  this  was 
one  of  tie  few  cases  where  instead  of  the  inventor  not  getting  the 
profits  of  his  invention,  the  public  was  denied  the  benefits  of  it 
for  10  years. 


Television  Has  Hollywood  Reaching  For  An  Aspirin 
(Kaspar  Monahan,  Scripps-Howard ,  from  Hollywood  in  "Washington 

Daily  News") 

Television  has  Hollywood  badly  worried.  Its  worries  get 
down  to  the  most  basic  of  all  problems  in  Hollywood  -  who’s  going  to 
pick  up  the  check'5  What  sort  of  shows  will  there  be*5 

Television  is  chiefly  presenting  "remote"  bills,  such  as 
prizefights,  baseball  and  football  games.  To  a  lesser  degree  it  is 
bringing  "live"  shows  into  the  homes  -  those  produced  in  radio  and 
television  studios. 

As  an  example  of  the  latter,  the  Don  Lee  station  in  Los 
Angeles  every  morning  televises  the  radio  feature  "9ueen  for  a  Day", 

Stuart  ^helps  -  show  producer  and  official  for  the  tele¬ 
vision  station  told  me  the  late  Mr.  Lee  put  a  fortune  in  this  pion¬ 
eer  television  set-up. 

"Up  to  now  it  hasn’t  made  a  Quarter,  but  better  days  are 
ahead  for  us",  he  said. 

Television,  once  it  takes  hold,  will  be  able  to  pay  its 
own  way.  But  there  are  many  problems  to  be  ironed  out,  of  which 
these  are  uppermost: 

Will  sports  promoters  fear  losses  in  patronage  and  demand 
a  huge  "take"  from  television?  Will  movie  producers  ever  consent  to 
the  televising  of  their  costly  films?  Wouldn’t  television  kill  the 
movie  in  a  one-shot  performance? 

Will  owners  of  television  sets  see  the  shows  free  or  will 
they  pay  for  the  privilege9  If  so,  how? 

Will  radio  suffer9  How  much  will  it  be  changed? 

Nobody  I  met  in  Hollywood  could  answer  these  questions. 
Everybody  was  speculating,  theorizing,  guessing  -  and  reaching  for 
an  aspirin. 


XXX  XXX  XXX 


14 


He  ini  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


TRADE  NOTES 


^hilco  is  offering  formal  licenses  to  all  set  manufactur¬ 
ers  to  use,  subject  to  royalties,  its  patents  and  inventions  in  the 
radio  receiver,  electrical  phonograph,  and  television  receiver 
fields,  John  Ballantyne,  its  president  said  today.  Approximately 
700  Philco  patents  and  inventions  are  thus  being  made  available  to 
the  rest  of  the  industry. 


New  advances  in  large  screen  television  with  pictures 
six  by  eight  feet  will  be  shown  tomorrow  night  (Thursday,  September 
25th)  in  Washington  by  the  RCA  Victor  Division  of  the  Radio  Corpor¬ 
ation  of  America. 


Artificial  crystals,  the  Bell  Telephone  Laboratores  in 
New  York  announced  this  week,  may  soon  be  produced  in  quantities 
almost  large  enough  to  supplant  most  natural  quartz,  a  product 
hitherto  indispensable  in  long-distance  telephone  and  radio  work. 
The  artificial  crystals  resemble  huge  clusters  of  rock  candy,  or 
ice  cubes,  as  they  ’’grow”  in  the  laboratory  in  large  glass  tanks. 


Sylvania  is  this  month  introducing  its  new  7- inch  Oscil¬ 
loscope  (Type  132)  to  be  used  in  radio  servicing  and  which  has 
industrial  and  laboratory  applications.  It  will  also  be  used  in 
receiver  alignment,  audio  circuit  analysis,  filter  and  vibrator 
waveform  checking  and  transmitter  monitoring.  The  price  is  $124.50. 


Raytheon  Manufacturing  Company  and  Subsidiaries  -  Year  to 
May  31:  Net  profit,  $920,235,  or  47  cents  a  common  share,  contrasted 
with  net  loss  in  previous  year  of  $333,102;  net  sales,  $66,414,310, 
compared  with  $105,886,829.  On  Aug.  1,  1947,  backlog  of  Government 
business  totaled  *36,900,000,  of  which  $83, 500, 000  represented  pro¬ 
duction  and  $13,300,000  represented  development  contracts. 


Representative  John  David  Lodge  (R) ,  of  Connecticut,  a  brother  of 
Senator  Henry  Cabot  Lodge  (R)  ,  sailed  on  the  ”0ueen  Elizabeth*'  for 
Europe  last  week  along  with  Representatives  Frances  R.  Bolton(R), 
of  Ohio;  Donald  L.  Jackson  (R),  of  California;  Chester  E,  Merrow 
(R) ,  of  New  Hampshire  and  Olin  E.  Teague  (D),  of  Texas. 

They  will  study  political  trends  and  the  effectiveness  of 
the  cultural  and  information  program  of  the  State  Department.  After 
reaching  Europe  the  group  will  split  up  and  some  will  include  stops 
in  North  Africa  and  the  Middle  East  in  their  itinerary. 

Asked  what  he  thought  of  the  State  Department’s  Voice  of 
America  broadcasts  to  foreign  countries,  Representative  Lodge  com¬ 
mented:  ’’The  Voice  of  America  has  been  speaking  with  a  frog  in  its 

throat,  If  we  could  clear  its  throat  it  would  be  more  effective.” 


L.  F.  Randolph,  of  the  RCA  Eouipment  Tube  Sales  organiza¬ 
tion,  died  last  week  after  an  illness  of  several  weeks.  Widely 
known  and  respected  in  the  trade,  Mr.  Randolph  had  been  with  RCA  for 
seventeen  years,  coming  to  the  company  from  the  E.  T.  Cunningham  Co. 
when  that  organization  merged  with  RCA  Radiotron  in  1930. 


15 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


9/24/47 


A  new  vacuum  tube  design  for  use  on  high  voltages  at 
altitudes  up  to  60,000  feet  has  been  announced  by  Amperex  Electron¬ 
ic  Corporation,  Brooklyn,  The  development  work  was  sponsored  by  the 
Air  Material  Command  of  the  U.  S.  Army  Air  Forces  and  the  tube  is 
especially  important  in  control  circuits  of  guided  missiles. 


To  meet  the  unusual  requirements  of  Great  Lakes  naviga¬ 
tion,  a  special  X-band  (3  cm.)  Mariners  Pathfinder  radar  has  been 
designed  by  Raytheon  Manufacturing  Co.,  Waltham,  Mass. 

This  new  model  provides  what  is  said  to  be  a  previously 
unattainable  degree  of  '’definition”,  presenting  in  truest  possible 
detail  a  chart  of  the  surrounding  area.  It  permits  two  navigational 
buoys  only  200  feet  apart  to  be  seen  as  separate  distinct  indica¬ 
tions  at  distances  greater  than  one  mile.  With  the  best  previous 
eauipment,  these  buoys  would  have  to  be  separated  nearly  400  feet 
to  be  observed  with  equal  distinctness. 


The  U.  S.  Air  Force  plane  completed  a  history-making  trans- 
Atlantic  flight  piloted  by  radio  this  week  opened  new  vistas  of  push¬ 
button  aviation.  The  Douglas  C-54  Skymaster  completed  the  2,400- 
mile  hop  from  Stephensville ,  Newfoundland,  to  England,  guided  en¬ 
tirely  by  wireless. 

From  take-off  until  the  four-engined  craft  landed  and  brak¬ 
ed  itself  to  a  stop  on  the  runway  at  Brize  Norton  airfield,  40  miles 
west  of  London,  no  human  hand  touched  the  controls.  Officials  emph¬ 
asized  that  the  craft  was  not  a  drone  controlled  by  a  "mother”  plane. 


Mr.  and  Mrs,  Julian  S.  Myrick  of  East  Hampton,  Long  Island, 
have  announced  the  engagement  of  their  daughter,  Cynthia  Southall, 
to  Assistant  Secretary  of  State  Charles  E.  Saltzman,  son  of  the  late 
Maj.  Gen.  Saltzman,  former  Chairman  of  the  old  Federal  Radio  Commis¬ 
sion. 


X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X 

New  Method  Of  Predicting  Sunspots  Aids  Radio  Forecasts  (continued) 

Groups  now  using  the  service  include  airline  companies, 
steamship  lines  and  the  merchant  marine,  television  and  radio  schools, 
American  and  foreign  universities,  radio  and  telegraph  companies, 
manufacturers  of  communication  equipment,  consulting  radio  engineers, 
press  wireless  and  telegraph  services,  radio  magazines,  broadcasting 
companies  both  here  and  overseas,  industrial  electrical  firms,  navi¬ 
gation  instrument  companies,  research  laboratories,  electric  power 
companies,  and  geophysical  exploration  organizations. 

Full  details  of  the  new  method  for  predicting  sunspots  may 
be  found  in  the  Technical  News  Bulletin  of  t'he  National  Bureau  of 
Standards,  Washington,  September  1947  issue. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


16 


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Founded  in  1924 


HEINL  NEWS  SERVICE 


Radio  —  Television  — 

FM 

—  Communications 

2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 

Washington  8,  D.  C. 

Robert  D.  Heinl, 

Radio  Blast  Truman’s  Reply  To  Roving  G.O.P.  Candidates. . 

WGBS,  Miami,  Other  Tall  Radio  Towers ,  Are  Hurricane  Targets*.., 

Zenith  Three  Months’  Net  Operating  Profit  #376, 744. . . . . . 

FCC  Shortens  Small  Station  Employees  Compensation  Reports...... 

Frank:  Mullen  Shakes  ’Em  Up  In  NBC  Efficiency  Revamp.. . 

Movie  Theatre  Owners  Have  First  View  Of  Large  Size  TV . 

Increased  Labor  Costs  Cause  Radio  Prices,  Says  Geddes.... . 

Taft  Says  Press  Gives  G.O.P.  Best  Break;  Radio  Worst..... . 

Heavy  World  Series  Advertising  Makes  Capital  TV  Conscious...... 

British  Will  Go  To  Town  Broadcasting  The  Royal  Wedding . 

Washington,  D.C.'s  Third  Television  Station  Begins  Thursday.... 
State  Dept.  "Voice"  Advisors  To  Carry  On;  Cowles  Chairman . 


.  .1 

.  .2 

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.  .4 

.  .5 

.  .5 

.  .  7 

.  .8 

.  .9 
.  .9 

.10 

.10 


What  The  Press  Thinks  Of  The  New  Broadcasting  Code . 11 

French  Decorate  Sarnoff;  Made  Legion  Of  Honor  Commander . .12 

Mrs.  Roosevelt  Asks  Vishinsky  To  Appear  On  Her  Radio  Program. ...  12 

Scissors  And  Paste.*  . . . . . . ..13 

Trade  Notes. . . . . . 15 


No.  1794 


October  1,  1947 


RADIO  BLAST  TRUMAN’S  REPLY  TO  ROVING  G.O.P.  CANDIDATES 


Never  was  the  power  of  radio  for  political  purposes  better 
exemplified  than  what  is  reliably  reported  to  be  President  Truman 
choosing  to  answer  the  country-wide  charges  made  by  all  the  travel¬ 
ling  Republican  presidential  aspirants  -  Dewey,  Taft,  Stassen  and 
Joe  Martin  -  with  a  single  coast-to-coast  broadcast  next  Wednesday 
(October  8)  in  Washington  in  connection  with  the  celebration  of 
Democratic  Women’s  Day.  Ostensibly  it  is  to  be  a  routine  address 
but  Washington  observers  believe  that,  although  the  speech  will  be 
addressed  to  the  women  members  of  his  party*  it  will  touch  upon 
many  issues  of  the  1948  campaign  and  will  be  directly  aimed  at 
Republican  presidential  candidates  now  so  busily  going  around  the 
country  trying  to  line  up  votes.  The  President,  it  is  thought,  might 
even  take  the  occasion  of  his  broadcast  to  the  women  to  put  in  some¬ 
thing  for  Wallace  who  is  just  starting  on  a  New  England  stumping 
tour. 


An  old  campaigner  close  to  the  White  House  expressed  the 
belief  that  President  Truman  could  reach  more  people  in  one  broadcast 
of  15  minutes  than  all  the  roving  candidates  could  in  15  days  of 
oldtime  barnstorming.  Furthermore  it  is  argued  that  radio  is  far 
less  dangerous  for  a  visiting  candidate  than  mixing  around  personally 
among  various  quarreling  local  factions.  For  instance,  a  slip  on  the 
part  of  Charles  Evans  Hughes  in  not  calling  on  Senator  Hiram  Johnson 
when  they  were  both  in  the  same  hotel  on  the  West  Coast  probably  cost 
Hughes  the  California  vote,  and  his  defeat  by  Woodrow  Wilson. 

As  the  1948  campaign  approaches  presidential  aspirants  are 
snuggling  up  to  radio  station  owners  while  touring  the  different 
States  just  as  they  used  to,  and  still  curry  the  favor  of  influent¬ 
ial  local  newspaper  publishers. 

President  Truman,  who  holds  the  whip  hand  on  the  Federal 
Communications  Commission  which,  in  turn,  holds  the  Sword  of  Democles 
over  all  broadcasters,  has  praised  radio  on  several  occasions  and 
more  recently  Governor  Dewey,  who  never  loses  an  opportunity  to 
acclaim  radio,  has  been  even  more  outspoken  on  the  subject. 

Among  congratulatory  telegrams  read  by  Robert  S.  Peare, 
Vice-President  of  General  Electric,  who  presided  at  the  broadcast 
celebrating  the  25th  Anniversary  of  Station  WGY  at  Schenectady,  was 
one  from  Mr,  Dewey,  which  emphasized  WGY  as  being  one  of  the  great¬ 
est  broadcasting  stations  in  the  country*  Continuing,  the  Governor’s 
message  read: 

’’Today  radio  has  become  an  integral  part  of  the  daily  lives 
of  the  citizens  of  our  State.  The  daily  news  broadcasts,  the  public 
service  and  education  programs,  the  information  services  and  the 
entertainment  provided  by  radio  have  become  a  necessary  part  of  our 
civilization. 


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10/1/47 


’’During  the  long  hard  years  of  war  the  radio  kept  us  in¬ 
formed  hour  by  hour  of  the  progress  and  victories  of  our  fighting 
men  and  women.  It  served  also  to  keep  us  alert  to  our  responsibil¬ 
ities  on  the  home  front.  It  performed  a  splendid  public  service 
and  contributed  mightily  in  making  Americans  the  best  informed  pub¬ 
lic  in  the  world. 

"In  the  days  that  lie  ahead,  radio  is  entering  upon  a  new 
phase.  Wartime  developments  have  opened  up  possibilities  of  an 
electronic  age  hitherto  undreamed  of.  Television  and  Frequency- 
Modulation  will  come  into  their  own.  More  than  any  other  channel 
of  communication,  radio  can  serve  as  a  great  force  for  good  in  the 
winning  of  the  peace.  It  can  link  the  freedom-loving  people  of  the 
world  together  in  a  great  communication  system  and  do  much  to  achieve 
international  understanding  and  co-operation.” 

Governor  Dewey  on  still  another  occasion  commended  the 
broadcasting  industry  for  its  vigilance  in  keeping  the  radio  free  of 
control  by  government  and  minority  groups.  The  result  is  that  the 
American  listening  public  is  the  best  informed  in  the  world,  he  said. 

Addressing  the  fourth  annual  convention  of  the  Association 
of  Women  Broadcasters  of  the  National  Association  of  Broadcasters  in 
New  York  City,  the  Governor  warned  of  many  groups  "who  want  to  take 
over  radio  and  manipulate  it  for  political  and  economic  purposes.” 

Governor  Dewey  asserted  that  "radio  has  remained  free  by 
keeping  its  programs  free  of  offense,  by  serving  the  right  of  the 
public  to  hear  the  truth  and  all  shades  of  opinion." 

"During  recent  years  we  have  had  many  groups  of  earnest 
brethren  who  want  to  take  over  radio  and  manipulate  it  for  political 
and  economic  purposes",  he  said.  "But  our  networks  and  stations 
have  seen  to  it  that  the  meddlesome  ones  have  no  excuse  for  joining 
the  other  nations  of  the  world  in  putting  the  iron  control  of  govern¬ 
ment  over  what  our  people  shall  hear  through  the  air." 

President  Truman’s  broadcast  on  Democratic  Women’s  Day 
will  be  heard  over  the  Mutual  network  via  Station  WOL  in  Washington 
at  1:50  P.M.  EST  next  Wednesday,  October  8th. 

XXXXXXXXXXXX 

WGBS ,  MIAMI,  OTHER  TALL  RADIO  TOWERS,  ARE  HURRICANE  TARGETS 

There  is  food  for  thought  for  broadcasters  erecting  tall 
FT  end  television  towers  in  the  way  the  devastating  Florida  and 
Gulf  hurricanesmowed  down  some  of  these  radio  sky-scrapers. 

WGBS,  the  Storer-Ryan  Fort  Industry  station  at  Miami  lost 
two  transmitter  towers  at  the  height  of  the  hurricane,  but  stayed 
on  the  air  with  the  one  remaining  tower.  Only  a  few  minutes  were 
required  by  transmitter  engineers  to  make  quick  adjustments  and  get 
the  station  back  on  the  air  after  the  two  towers  were  destroyed  by 


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125-mile-an-hour  winds.  In  accordance  with  a  previously  formulated 
plan,  engineers  and  announcers  went  on  duty  at  the  transmitter  the 
night  before  the  storm.  Duplicates  of  all  local  programs  plus  a 
supply  of  recorded  music  were  kept  at  the  transmitter.  The  fore¬ 
sightedness  paid  off,  for  the  A.  T.  &  T.  lines  were  disrupted  and 
no  network  service  was  available  from  Wednesday  to  Friday,  when  it 
was  resumed  only  on  a  share  basis  with  other  network  stations.  Mes¬ 
sages  from  other  parts  of  the  country  reouesting  information  about 
relatives  were  said  by  the  Red  Cross  to  have  achieved  nearly  10(K 
response.  All  pertinent  information  was  broadcast  in  both  English 
and  Spanish.  The  station  was  fortunate  to  have  on  hand  four  broad¬ 
cast  towers  for  its  new  50-kw  transmitter. 

A  tower  of  WIOD,  Miami,  was  bent  over  double  -  almost 
exactly  in  half  -  the  top  of  the  tower  touching  the  surface  of  the 
bay.  At  that,  service  was  only  interrupted  several  minutes  while 
the  transmitter  was  being  re-tuned.  WJNO  at  West  Palm  Beach  lost  a 
tower.  A  falling  cocoanut  tree  broke  the  transmission  line  to  the 
antenna  at  WWPG-,  West  Palm  Beach. 

A  tower  of  WNOE,  New  Orleans,  collapsed  but  the  station 
was  able  to  carry  on.  Not  so  lucky  was  WSMB,  New  Orleans,  which  was 
forced  off  the  air  about  4  hours  the  day  the  hurricane  hit. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

ZENITH  THREE  MONTHS’  NET  OPERATING  PROFIT  £376,744 

Zenith  Radio  Corporation  reports  an  estimated  net  consoli¬ 
dated  operating  profit  for  the  first  three  months  ended  July  31, 

1947  of  its  current  fiscal  year  amounting  to  £'373,744,  after  Federal 
income  tax  provision  of  £229,739,  depreciation,  excise  taxes  and 
reserves  for  contingencies. 

’’Although  manufacturing  efficiency  improved  during  the  past 
quarter  as  a  result  of  improved  manufacturing  techniques  and  the  main¬ 
tenance  of  a  high  rate  of  output,  these  improvements  were  offset  to  a 
large  extent  by  continuing  increases  in  component  and  cabinet  cost, 
together  with  the  additional  cost  of  a  wage  increase  granted  to  all 
hourly  workers  in  May  1927",  E.  F.  McDonald,  President,  eaid. 

"Demand  for  the  company’s  home  receivers,  automobile  radios 
and  portable  radios  continues  to  be  greater  than  the  maximum  output 
of  our  manufacturing  facilities.  Production  of  the  new  model  ’75’ 
hearing  aid  is  steadily  increasing  and  is  being  offered  only  to  reg¬ 
istered  owners  of  previous  Zenith'  models.  The  demand  from  these  own¬ 
ers  has  been  greatly  in  excess  of  our  ability  to  produce.  Therefore, 
this  new  instrument  will  not  be  offered  to  the  public  generally  until 
about  February  1,  1948. 

"Since  our  last  report,  Zenith  has  introduced  Phone  Vision, 
the  new  system  developed  by  the  engineers  of  this  corporation  which 
will  make  television  economically  sound  by  permitting  the  showing  of 
first-run  movies  in  the  home  over  the  telephone  wire,  for  a  fee. 


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'’This  service  will  not  deprive  the  public  of  free  televi¬ 
sion.  It  is  an  additional  service  which  will  be  built  into  televi¬ 
sion  receivers  of  the  future.  They  will  continue  to  receive  all 
free  television  programs  available,  in  addition  to  the  special 
features  for  which  a  fee  is  charged. 

"The  public  already  have  demonstrated  that  they  are  will¬ 
ing  to  pay  for  that  which  they  want.  All  combination  radio-phono¬ 
graphs,  which  represent  the  largest  dollar  volume  of  the  radio 
industry,  give  two  services:  first,  free  radio  and,  second,  music 
from  phonograph  records  for  which  the  owners  pay. 

"In  a  survey  made  this  month  in  the  Los  Angeles  area  by  an 
independent  research  organization,  73 %  of  the  television  owners  said 
that  they  are  willing  to  pay  for  television  programs  of  the  type  that 
will  be  offered  by  Phone  vision.  Zenith  is  offering  licenses  under 
Phone  vision  to  its  competitors,  and  is  proceeding  with  its  develop¬ 
ment  . " 

XXXXXXXXXXXX 

FCC  SHORTENS  SMALL  STATION  EMPLOYEES  COMPENSATION  REPORTS 

The  Federal  Communications  Commission  has  revised  the 
report  form,  effective  October  6,  1947.  "Employees  and  Their  Compen¬ 
sations",  which  is  required  to  be  filed  annually  by  all  broadcast 
stations  and  networks.  The  primary  purpose  of  the  present  revision 
is  to  simplify  reporting  by  the  smaller  broadcast  stations  (those 
with  fewer  than  15  employees)  through  permitting  them  to  file  employ¬ 
ee  and  wage  data  on  a  new  short  form.  This  new  schedule  is  especi¬ 
ally  designed  to  serve  the  dual  purposes  of  reducing  the  reporting 
burden  of  small  stations,  and  reflecting  the  low  degree  of  job  spec¬ 
ialization  at  such  stations,  which  typically  employ  multiple-duty  or 
"combination"  employees.  It  is  expected  that  between  one-third  and 
one-half  of  all  broadcast  stations  will  be  eligible  to  file  the  short 
schedule. 


Larger  stations  and  networks  will  continue  to  supply  sub¬ 
stantially  the  same  information  as  currently r  though  in  a  simplified 
form. 

The  Commission  feels  that  these  revisions  will  complete  its 
task,  undertaken  a  year  ago,  of  securing  representative  and  reason¬ 
ably  complete  data  on  the  number,  types  and  compensation  of  broad¬ 
cast  station  employees.  Such  data  are  not  available  outside  the 
Commission  but  also  to  present  and  prospective  station  operators  and 
employees,  and  various  public  and  private  individuals  and  organiza¬ 
tions  interested  in  the  radio  industry.  Returns  filed  on  the  new 
schedule  will  be  completed  and  tabulations  from  them  are  expected  to 
be  available  for  public  use  shortly  after  the  first  of  the  year. 

XXXXXXXX 


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He  ini  Radio  News  Service 


10/1/47 


FRANK  MULLEN  SHAKES  ’EM  UP  IN  NBC  EFFICIENCY  REVAMP 


Important  changes  in  the  executive  staff  of  the  National 
Broadcasting  Company  have  been  made  by  Frank  E.  Mullen,  Executive 
Vice  President,  in  order  to  speed  development  of  the  network’s 
coast-to-coast  television  facilities  and  its  sight-and-sound  pro¬ 
gramming.  Further  shifts  are  reported  in  the  cards  with  maybe  some 
new  Vice-Presidents. 

Mr.  Mullen’s  announcement  follows  in  part: 

’’John  E.  Royal,  Vice-President,  is  appointed  Assistant  to 
the  Executive  Vice  President  on  Television.  Personnel  of  the  Tele¬ 
vision  Department  will  report  to  Noran  E.  Kersta,  Director  of  Tele¬ 
vision  Operations,  who  will  report  to  the  Executive  Vice-President. 

'’In  order  that  0.  B.  Hanson,  Vice  President  and  Chief 
Engineer,  may  devote  the  major  portion  of  his  time  to  assisting 
the  Executive  Vice-President  in  the  development  of  NBC's  nation-wide 
television  system,  George  McElrath  is  appointed  Director  of  Engineer¬ 
ing  Operations. 

”Mr.  McElrath  will  assume  full  responsibility  for  the 
management  and  operation  of  the  technical  aspects  of  sound  broad¬ 
casting  and  the  business  administration  of  the  home  office  engineer¬ 
ing  groups.  Mr.  McElrath  will  report  to  John  H.  MacDonald,  Admin¬ 
istrative  Vice  President,  on  matters  pertaining  to  the  management  of 
the  department.  However,  Mr.  McElrath  will  continue  to  report  dir¬ 
ectly  to  Mr.  Hanson  on  matters  of  technical  design  and  engineering# 

"Charles  P#  Hammond  is  appointed  Assistant  to  the  Execut¬ 
ive  Vice  President.  James  H.  Nelson  is  appointed  Director  of 
Advertising  and  Promotion,  reporting  directly  to  Mr.  Hammond. 

Mr.  Mullen  explained  that  Mr.  Royal  would  actively  assist 
him  in  the  development  of  new  talent  and  features  for  NBC’s  rapidly 
expanding  television  network. 

"With  two  more  stations  joining  our  video  network  this 
year,  many  more  planning  to  join  in  1948  and  with  technicians  begin¬ 
ning  to  gather  the  country  together  by  co-axial  cable  and  radio 
relay,  programming  has  now  become  of  prime  importance  to  television# 
It  will  be  Mr.  Royal’s  task  to  work  with  me  in  complementing  our 
excellent  facilities  with  the  best  programs  possible." 

Mr.  Kersta,  Mr.  Mullen  said,  would  be  in  charge  of  the 
broadcast  operations  of  the  NBC  Television  Department. 

Mr.  Hanson  will  assist  Mr.  Mullen  in  planning  the  expan¬ 
sion  of  the  technical  phases  of  television.  He  will  supervise  the 
building  and  installations  of  new  stations,  int er- connect  ions , 
relays  and  other  engineering  facilities# 

XXXXXXXXXX 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


10/1/47 


MOVIE  THEATRE  OWNERS  HAVE  FIRST  VIEW  OF  LARGE  SIZE  TV 


An  occasion  which  might  have  historic  significance  was 
last  week  in  Washington  when  the  Theatre  Equipment  and  Supply  Manu¬ 
facturers’  Association  and  the  Theatre  Equipment  Dealers  Protective 
Association  witnessed  the  first  demonstration  to  be  given  before 
theatre  groups  of  large-screen  television* 

The  show  was  put  on  for  them  to  give  an  idea  of  the  Radio 
Corporation  of  America’s  development  of  6  by  8  feet  stage  pictures* 
Furnished  by  the  National  Broadcasting  Company’s  television  station 
WNBW ,  the  pictures  were  clear  and  bright.  No  attempt  was  made  to 
secure  individual  opinion  of  the  theatrical  exhibitors  but  the 
impression  gained  was  that  the  showing  had  been  favorably  received* 

Possible  applications  of  large-screen  television,  in 
addition  to  that  in  the  theatre,  it  was  pointed  out  by  J*  F. 

O’Brien,  Manager  of  the  RCA  Theatre  Equipment  Division,  include  the 
accommodet ion  of  overflow  crowds  at  conventions  and  meetings,  and 
accommodation  of  television  studio  visitors. 

The  experimental  large-screen  television  projector  used 
in  the  demonstrations  is  the  result  of  intensive  research  carried 
on  by  RCA  engineers  and  the  RCA  Laboratories  for  several  years  in 
the  fields  of  optics,  electronic  circuits,  and  special-type  tubes. 

It  employs  the  system  of  reflective  optics  developed  by  RCA,  com¬ 
bining  great  magnifying  power  with  minimum  loss  of  light,  and  a  new 
high-voltage  projection  type  cathode-ray  tube  with  a  picture  screen 
composed  of  extremely  brilliant  phosphors. 

Recalling  that  large-screen  television  was  demonstrated  by 
RCA  before  the  war,  Mr*  O’Brien  explained  that  the  projector  used  in 
the  present  demonstrations  incorporates  many  refinements  made  pos*- 
sible  by  advances  in  both  electronics  and  optics  during  and  since 
the  war. 


"The  equipment  used  in  Washington,  because  of  these  refine¬ 
ments”,  he  said,  ’’affords  greater  picture  detail,  higher  brilliance, 
and  increased  steadiness.  The  picture  size  is  6  by  8  feet,  with  a 
projection  throw  of  15  feet.  The  projector  is  52|  inches  long,  32 
inches  wide,  and  62  inches  high.  This  is  identical  to  the  projectors 
which  RCA  is  supplying  to  Warner  Brothers  and  20th  Century-Fox  for 
use  in  further  research  in  connection  with  the  application  of  this 
type  of  television  system  in  the  motion  picture  industry.” 

XXXXXXXXXX 

The  number  of  radio  receiving  sets  licensed  in  Sweden  as 
of  March  31,  1947,  was  1,915,602,  compared  with  1,895,349  in  December 
1946,  the  U.  S.  Commerce  Dept,  reports. 

The  number  of  sets  equipped  for  short-wave  reception  is 
estimated  at  about  75  or  85  percent  of  receivers  now  in  use,  or 
approximately  l,530,000f 

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INCREASED  LABOR  COSTS  CAUSE  RADIO  PRICES,  SAYS  GEDDES 


Greatly  increased  costs  of  factory  labor,  now  69  percent 
higher  than  prewar,  and  of  materials,  freight,  etc.,  are  responsible 
for  present  radio  prices  and  preclude  radical  price  reductions, 

Bond  Geddes,  Executive  Vice  President  of  the  Radio  Manufacturers’ 
Association,  said  in  an  address  at  the  third  annual  Trade  Show  of 
the  West  Coast  Electronics  Association  in  San  Francisco  last  Saturday. 

Pointing  out  that  the  average  hourly  rate  of  pay  in  the 
radio  industry  rose  from  58.1  cents  in  1939  and  68  cents  in  1941  to 
$1.15  at  present,  Mr.  Geddes  went  on  : 

”A  large  part  of  the  whole  spiral  of  inflated  radio  costs 
is  based  on  labor,  in  my  opinion.  This  applies  also  to  raw  material, 
freight  and  selling  costs  and  up  the  line  to  components,  receivers, 
transmitters  -  in  fact  to  all  industry  products.” 

Nevertheless,  Mr.  Geddes  predicted  that  1947  will  prove 
one  of  the  best  years  for  the  radio  industry  and  the  present  high 
level  of  production  will  continue  into  1948  ’’with  the  assurance  of 
wide  and  new  markets  through  FM,  television,  and  other  electronic 
applicat ions 

Present  indications  are  that  1947  will  establish  a  new 
record  for  radio  set  production  and  sales,  he  said.  The  industry’s 
output,  as  measured  by  RMA  member  company  reports,  was  11,031,935 
receivers  during  the  eight  months  through  August.  This  gives  every 
indication,  he  added,  that  1947  will  exceed  the  previous  high  of 
last  year  when  the  industry  produced  15  million  receivers  with  a 
dollar  volume  of  $415,000,000  in  spite  of  reconversion  difficulties. 

”As  the  final  Quarter  of  the  year  customarily  brings  60 
percent  of  our  annual  sales,  we  can  confidently  look  forward  to  a 
new  all-time  record  in  1947  of  above  15  million  sets  and  a  probable 
total  industry  dollar  volume  of  close  to  three-quarters  of  a  bil¬ 
lion”,  Mr.  Geddes  declared. 

In  radio  set  production  the  percentage  of  radio-phonograph 
combination  receivers  this  year  is  about  double  the  1941  rate,  of 
both  table  and  console  types,  while  straight  consoles,  with  phono¬ 
graphs,  have  almost  disappeared  from  the  market,  he  added. 

The  public  has  always  benefitted  from  the  keen  competition 
that  is  traditional  in  the  radio  industry,  Mr.  Geddes  pointed  out, 
as  well  as  from  the  continuing  technological  advancements, 

’’There  is  no  monopoly,  price  or  production  collusion  in 
our  industry,  either  in  receiving  sets,  tubes,  parts  or  any  other 
line”,  he  added. 

The  record  of  the  industry  in  FM  set  production  completely 
refutes  the  charge  of  some  FM  broadcasters  that  manufacturers  have 

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been  "stalling",  Mr.  Geddes  stated.  Moreover,  it  is  fundamental 
that  neither  the  dealers  nor  the  public  will  buy  FM  sets  in  areas 
where  there  is  no  FM  broadcasting  service. 

"Television,  as  I  see  it,  has  at  long  last  turned  the 
corner",  he  said  in  reviewing  the  part  that  RMA  has  played  in  its 
development. 

"This  year  has  been  the  first  really  aggressive  promotion, 
substantial  production  and  tremendous  public  interest  in  television. 
Already  RMA.  statistics  record  production,  for  the  first  eight 
months  ending  in  August,  of  68,669  television  receivers.  This 
indicates  total  1947  sales  of  certainly  100,000  television  receiv¬ 
ers,  .with  increasing  commercial  sponsorship  by  local  as  well  as 
prominent  national  interests,  promising  to  raise  television  to  new 
heights  in  1948," 

XXXXXXXXXXX 

TAFT  SAYS  PRESS  GIVES  G.0.P ..  BEST  BREAK;.  RADIO  WORST 

Appraising  his  idea  of  press  and  radio  treatment  accorded 
to  Republicans  in  Washington,  Senator  Robert  A.  Taft  in  Portland, 
Ore.,  according  to  Robert  C.  Albright  of  the  Washington  Post  said 
Republicans  got  "an  even  break"  from  Washington  newspapermen  gener¬ 
ally  but  "less  than  an  even  break"  from  columnists.  He  charged  that 
"two  thirds  of  the  radio  comment  is  ant i-Republican"  and  offered  to 
back  that  up  with  a  "list"  back  in  Washington. 

The  Associated  Press  reported  Senator  Taft  as  saying 
regarding  the  Republicans’  Washington  treatment: 

"Newspaper  men  generally:  "An  even  break". 

"Newspaper  columnists:  ’Less  than  an  even  break.’ 

"Radio  commentators:  ’Very  much  worse  than  an  even  break.’ 

"The  ’scoring’  was  in  response  to  questions  at  a  news  conference. 

"He  said  he  thought  ’the  orthodox  view  among  everybody  in  Wash¬ 
ington,  including  newspaper  men,  was  still  the  New  Deal  view.’ 

"Radio,  he  said,  gave  the  Republicans  ’a  bad  break’,  while  ’two- 
thirds  of  the  radio  comment  is  ant i-Republican. ’ 

I  think  the  columnists  are  a  little  against  us  but  I  think 
that  they  are  getting  much  more  friendly  now’,  he  added." 

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HEARTY  WORLD  SERIES  ADVERTISING  MAKES  CAPITAL  TV  CONSCIOUS 


If  the  newspaper  advertising  of  the  telecasting  of  the 
World  Series  games  was  as  heavy  in  all  the  cities  as  it  was  in 
Washington,  television  got  one  of  the  biggest  publicity  boosts  in 
its  history.  Page  ads  were  carried  by  television  manufacturers, 
distributors,  and  retailers. 

Furthermore,  broadside  invitations  were  extended  by  depart¬ 
ment  stores  and  others  handling  television  sets  inviting  one  and  all 
to  come  and  see  the  World  Series  ’’for  free”.  The  response  was  trem¬ 
endous.  Capacity  audiences  were  reported  everywhere  with  the  result 
that  thousands  in  the  Capital  have  been  made  television  conscious. 

At  this  early  writing  (’Wednesday)  no  reports  are  available  as  to  the 
actual  number  of  sets  sold  or  orders  taken. 

Ford  Motor  Co.  and  Gillette  Safety  Razor  Company  co-sponsor¬ 
ed  the  telecasts,  the  rights  for  which  were  sold  to  these  companies 
for  ^65 ,000. 

In  order  to  encourage  the  development  of  FM  in  the  Wash¬ 
ington  area,  WOL  and  the  Mutual  Broadcasting  System,  Commander  T.A.M. 
Craven,  WOL  General  Manager  made  arrangements  to  make  the  broadcasts 
of  the  Series  available  to  WASH-FM.  WOL  and  MBS  had  exclusive  rights 
to  the  ’’Series”  broadcasts  in  Washington  -  however,  WOL-FM  was  not 
completed  in  time  to  broadcast  the  Series. 

To  bring  these  games  to  an  even  larger  listening  audience, 
WOL  and  MBS  through  Commander  Craven  also  completed  arrangements  to 
have  the  play-by-play  broadcasts  carried  over  the  lines  of  the  Muzak 
Music  Service. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

BRITISH  WILL  GO  TO  TOWN  BROADCASTING  THE  ROYAL  WEDDING 

Special  broadcasting  arrangements  are  being  made  for  the 
wedding  of  H.R.H.  Princess  Elizabeth  and  Lieut.  Philip  Mountbatten, 
R.N.,  on  November  20.  BBC’s  Overseas  Services  will  give  world  cover¬ 
age  to  broadcasts  of  the  wedding  ceremony  in  Westminster  Abbey  and 
to  accounts  by  commentators  stationed  along  the  route  of  the  proces¬ 
sion  from  Buckingham  Palace  to  Westminster  Abbey  and  back.  Listeners 
all  over  the  world  will  be  able  to  listen  to  the  ceremony  and  hear 
descriptions  of  the  scenes  in  London  by  tuning  in  to  the  BBC. 

Later  that  day  and  on  the  day  following  the  BBC  will  broad¬ 
cast  in  the  Overseas  Service  a  sixty-minute  program  compiled  from 
recordings  of  the  ceremony  and  of  on-the-spot  descriptions  and 
reports  from  London.  Before  November  20  a  thirty-minute  feature 
program  describing  the  preparations  being  made  for  the  Royal  Wedding 
will  be  broadcast  in  all  services. 

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WASHINGTON,  D.C.’S  THIRD  TELEVISION  STATION  BEGINS  THURSDAY 


WMAL-TV,  Washington’s  newest  television  station,  will 
open  Friday  night,  October  3rd,  by  televising  the  Georgetown -For dham 
football  game  from  Griffith  Stadium. 

Last  minute  technical  preparations  for  the  first  telecasts 
are  moving  apace  at  the  WMAL-TV  transmitter  site  at  American  Univer¬ 
sity.  WMAL-TV  will  also  cover  all  home  games  of  the  Washington 
Redskins  pro  games.  The  pro  grid  series  opens  on  Sunday,  October 
5th  with  the  Redsk in-Pittsburgh  Steelers  game,  also  from  Griffith 
Stadium. 

Station  WTTG,  Dumont,  was  the  first  television  station  in 
the  National  Capital  followed  later  by  WNBW,  NBC;  WMAL-TV  is  owned 
and  operated  by  the  Washington  Evening  Star. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

STATE  DEPT.  "VOICE"  ADVISORS  TO  CARRY  ON;  COWLES  CHAIRMAN 

Despite  the  resignation  of  William  Benton,  former  advertis¬ 
ing  executive,  as  Assistant  Secretary  of  State,  the  Radio  Advisory 
Committee  chosen  by  Mr,  Benton  is  expected  to  carry  on  until  Congress 
at  its  next  session  decides  the  fate  of  the  "Voice  of  America". 

Gardner  Cowles,  President  of  the  Cowles  Broadcasting  Com¬ 
pany  and  publisher  of  the  Des  Moines  (la)  Register  &  Tribune,  who 
at. one  time  headed  the  Domestic  Branch  of  the  Office  of  War  Inform¬ 
ation,  was  first  named  and  presumably  will  be  Chairman.  Other  mem¬ 
bers  in  addition  to  Mr.  Cowles,  are: 

Wesley  Dumm,  President,  Associated  Broadcasters,  Inc.; 

Mark  Ethridge,  publisher  of  Louisville  (Ky.)  Courier  Journal;  Walter 
Evans,  President  of  Wrest inghouse  Electric  Corporation;  Don  Francisco, 
Vice-President  and  Director  of  I.  Walter  Thompson  Advertising  Agency; 
the  Rev.  Robert  I.  Cannon,  President  of  Fordham  University;  Edgar 
Kobak,  President  of  Mutual  Broadcasting  System;  Roy  Larsen,  Presi¬ 
dent  of  Time,  Inc.;  Harold  Lasswell,  School  of  Law,  Yale  University; 
Walter  Lemmon,  President  of  World-Wide  Broadcasting  Foundation; 
lust  in  Miller,  President  of  National  Association  of  Broadcasters. 

Also,  Edward  Noble,  Chairman  of  American  Broadcasting  Co.; 
Paul  Porter,  former  Chairman  of  the  Federal  Communications  Commis¬ 
sion;  Philip  Reed,  Chairman  of  General  Electric  Co.;  lames  D.  Shouse, 
President  of  Crosley  Corp.;  Frank  Stanton,  President  of  Columbia 
Broadcasting  System;  Niles  Trammell,  President  of  NBC. 

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WHAT  THE  PRESS  THINKS  OF  THE  NEW  BROADCASTING  CODE 


Of  the  National  Association  of  Broadcasters’  Code  adapted 
at  Atlantic  City,  the  New  York  Times  had  this  to  say: 

’’That  the  convention  did  not  produce  wholly  definitive 
results  probably  is  only  to  be  expected.  The  text  of  the  proposed 
new  code  of  standards  runs  nearly  4,500  words  in  length,  and  a  maj¬ 
ority  of  the  important  clauses  have  a  direct  bearing  on  the  finan¬ 
cial  revenue  of  many  if  not  most  of  the  eleven  hundred  stations 
represented  in  the  N.A.B.  membership.  If  a  new  code  is  to  be  effect¬ 
ive,  a  station  operator  is  entitled  to  know  in  detail  what  is  expect¬ 
ed  of  him. 

’’But  as  was  emphasized  by  Charles  R.  Denny,  Jr.,  Chairman 
of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission,  radio  will  serve  its  own 
interests  if  deliberations  on  a  new  code  are  implemented  by  practi¬ 
cal  action.” 

The  Washington  Post  expressed  itself,  in  part,  as  follows: 

”It  is  but  fair  to  say  that  the  major  networks  and  most 
individual  radio  stations  already  adhere  to  standards  higher  than 
those  prescribed  in  the  NAB  code  which  is,  plainly,  a  minimum  of 
decency.  The  industry’s  problem  is  to  compel  adherence  to  this 
minimum  of  decency  on  the  part  of  those  stations  which  have  no  re¬ 
gard  for  principle.  The  code  as  announced  makes  no  provision  for 
enforcement;  and  indeed  it  is  hard  to  see  how  the  industry,  which 
must  suffer  in  prestige  from  violations  of  its  code,  can  punish 
the  violators  in  any  way  save  through  publicity.  It  is  here,  per¬ 
haps,  that  the  FCC  and  the  NAB  can  cooperate  effectively.  ’If  you 
adopt  a  good  code’ ,  FCC  Chairman  Denny  told  the  NAB  convention,  ’the 
Commission  may  .  .  .  inquire  whether  a  particular  station  has  lived 
up  to  the  minimum  standards  adopted  by  the  industry.’  He  made  it 
clear,  however,  that  the  FCC  would  not  let  the  industry  prescribe 
the  Government’s  standards.  It  would  simply,  as  it  should,  help 
the  industry  to  help  itself.” 

Variety: 

’’Actually,  the  code  as  adopted  by  the  NAB  Board  of  Dir¬ 
ectors  in  Atlantic  City  last  week  leaves  the. one  vital  issue  -  the 
limitation  on  commercial  time  -  open  for  revision.  And  on  this 
point  hangs  the  effectiveness  of  the  entire  code.  For  should  the 
broadcasters,  through  their  directors  on  the  NAB,  fail  to  endorse 
this  particular  provision,  all  other  gains  would  be .meaningless . 
Overcommercialization  has  done  more  to  handicap  radio’s  stature 
than  all  other  abuses  combined.  ***** 

’’There’s  a  vital  job  to  be  done  in  the  interim  period 
before  the  Board  again  meets  in  November  to  consider  the  industry 
sentiment  that  the  next  few  weeks  will  bring  forth.  It’s  the  men 
of  wider  vision,  those  who  prepared  the  code  and  those  who  fought 


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for  its  adoption,  who  mast  carry  through  and  convince  the  uncon¬ 
vinced  of  the  wisdom  of  self-regulation.  To  water  down  what  is 
basically  the  heart  of  the  code  would  negate  any  credit  redounding 
to  the  industry  from  the  adoption  of  all  the  other  features  embod¬ 
ied  in  the  code,  regardless  of  their  merit.  The  job  isn’t  over 
by  a  long  shot,  neither  for  the  broadcasters  nor  for  that  segment 
of  the  public  which  inspired  the  realization  for  the  need  of  a  code. 
If  by  any  chance  they  leave  well  enough  alone  and  assume  that  its 
adoption  is  a  fait  accompli,  it  could  well  be  that,  come  November, 
all  the  gains  achieved  in  Atlantic  City  may  be  lost.” 

XXXXXXXXXX 

FRENCH  DECORATE  SARNOFF;  MADE  LEGION  OF  HONOR  COMMANDER 

Brig.  Gen.  David  Sarnoff,  President  and  Chairman  of  the 
Board  of  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America,  received  the  Cross  of 
Commander  of  the  French  Legion  of  Honor  last  week  at  a  reception 
at  the  Waldorf-Astoria  Hotel  in  New  York  City. 

Ludovic  Chancel,  French  Consul  General  in  New  York,  made 
the  presentation  in  recognition  of  General  Sarnoff’ s  "distinguished 
services  in  France  as  an  officer  at  Supreme  Headquarters;  his  re¬ 
establishment  of  communication  circuits  following  France’s  liber¬ 
ation  and  his  outstanding  work  during  more  than  thirty  years  in 
building  friendly  relations  and  understanding  between  the  peoples  of 
America  and  France.” 


XXXXXXXXXXX 

MRS.  ROOSEVELT  ASKS  VI3HIN3KY  TO  APPEAR  ON  HER  RADIO  PROGRAM 

Mrs.  Eleanor  Roosevelt  has  invited  Andrei  Y.  Vishinsky  to 
appear  as  a  guest  next  Sunday,  October  5th,  on  the  first  of  a  series 
of  broadcasts  at  which  the  late  President’s  wife  will  be  moderator, 
her  secretary  said  last  night. 

Miss  Malvina  Thompson,  Mrs.  Roosevelt’s  secretary,  said 
the  Russian  Deputy  Foreign  Minister  was  asked  to  appear  or  to  send 
someone  to  represent  him.  He  has  not  yet  replied,  the  secretary 
said. 


Mrs.  Roosevelt  has  also  asked  Stanoje  Simic,  Yugoslav 
Foreign  Minister,  to  appear  on  the  broadcast,  first  of  a  series  of 
panel  discussions  of  United  Nations  problems  over  the  American  Broad¬ 
casting  Co.  network.  Several  Americans  have  been  invited  to  appear 
with  Vishinsky  and  Simic. 

First  topic  on  the  series,  to  be  broadcast  at  12:30  P.M. 
EST,  each  Sunday,  will  be  the  draft  submitted  to  the  U.  N.  General 
Assembly  by  the  Commission  on  Freedom  of  Information,  discussion  of 
which  led  to  charges  and  countercharges  of  ’’warmongering”.  Mrs. 
Roosevelt  has  been  designated  officially  to  answer  Vishinsky’ s  ’’war¬ 
mongering”  charges  against  the  United  States. 

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SCISSORS  AND  PASTE 


Atlantic  City?  Never  Again!;  NAB  Also  Rapped 

( '’Variety” ) 


Dog-tired,  footsore  broadcasters,  weary  after  four  days' 
exposure  to  Atlantic  City  sun  and  plenty  of  hot  air  at  Convention 
Hall,  are  now  in  the  process  of  making  it  plain  to  the  National 
Association  of  Broadcasters  that  this  year's  convention  was  definite¬ 
ly  not  the  dish  they  ordered. 

Most  broadcasters  appear  to  feel  NAB  did  a  swell  job  of 
organization  but  plenty  of  hot  letters  are  expected  here  blasting 
Atlantic  City  as  a  convention  site,  the  wholesale  failure  of  the 
resort  hotels  to  honor  long-held  NAB  reservations  and  the  difficul¬ 
ties  of  making  contact  when  3,000  convention  goers  are  bedded  down 
in  a  dozen,  widely  separated  hotels. 

Survey  of  returned  station  men  indicates  strong  feeling 
that  this  Convention  -  with  the  exception  of  the  Code  discussions 
and  post-Convention  anti-Petrillo  resolutions  -  lacked  both  the 
wallop  and  spirit  of  last  year's  Chi  meet. 

Here  are  some  of  the  gripes: 

L,  Small  station  men  and  newcomers  to  radio  apparently  came 
away  with  impression  that  webs  are  still  calling  all  the  plays  at 
NAB  and  that  the  Association,  badly  in  need  of  more  dough,  has  to 
play  ball  with  the  big  fellows  as  their  best  chance  of  plumping 
the  NAB  kitty.  Some  sentiment  was  found  that  NAB  has  grown  too  big 
to  adequately  care  for  all  segments  of  its  membership  during  single 
brief  convention. 

2*  Although  Petrillo  problem  was  No.  1  concern  of  all  broad¬ 
casters,  NAB  soft-pedaled  the  entire  subject.  Again,  wee-watters  and 
new  NABers  who  were  attending  their  first  convention  protested  that 
not  enough  attention  was  given  to  the  No.  1  problem  of  survival.  As 
evidence,  some  pointed  to  "shotgun"  tactics  in  pushing  through  the 
Code,  even  in  tentative  form,  and  earmarking  of  only  one  session  to 
economic  problems.  A  few  managers  thought  both  Denny  and  the  NAB 
could  have  dredged  up  more  advice  for  them. 

3.  Slipshod  handling  of  balloting  for  new  Directors  is  being 
mentioned  as  indication  that  NAB  elections  are  cut  and  dried,  to 
perpetuate  the  old  guard. 

4.  There  was  general  dissatisfaction  with  hastily-assembled 
non-radio  speakers  -  NAM' s  ultra-conservative  Robert  Wason  and  Tames 
O'Neill,  of  the  American  Legion. 

5.  Convention-goers'  complaint  about  the  BMI  entertainment  for 
the  NAB  annual  banquet  was  that  there  was  not  too  little,  but  too 
much  talent,  and  affair  was  at  least  an  hour  too  long. 

6.  Broadcasters  and  everybody  else  in  Atlantic  City  "to  make 

a  deal"  were  griped  by  difficulties  of  catching  up  with  people,  most 
of  them  en  route  to  any  one  of  several  parties  in  a  half-dozen  differ¬ 
ent  hotels.*  *  *  Unlike  the  Chi  convention  last  year  where  the  lawyers 
picked .up  plenty  of  new  business,  plaint  this  year  is  that  everybody 
is  trying  to  sell  his  station  at  a  fancy  figure  before  the  bottom 
drops  out  of  radio. 


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Radio  in  AFL  2  Million  Kitty  To  Beat  Taft -Hart ley  Act 

{Drew  Pearson) 

A  two-million  dollar  kitty  will  be  voted  at  the  San 
Francisco  convention  of  the  American  Federation  of  Labor,  October 
6th  to  launch  the  AFLTs  campaign  to  defeat  members  of  Congress  who 
supported  the  Taft-Hartley  labor  bill, 

Puestion  troubling  AFL  leaders  is  how  to  spend  the  money 
without  violating  the  Taft-Hartley  Act  which  prohibits  a  labor  union 
from  using  union  dues  for  political  activity.  Here  is  how  AFL 
moguls  plan  to  do  it. 

The  two  million  dollars  will  be  spent  in  a  so-called  press 
and  radio  ’’educational  program”  to  acquaint  the  American  public  with 
the  great  strides  made  by  labor  and  industry  under  the  Wagner  Act, 
now  supplanted  by  the  restrictive  Taft-Hartley  Act. 


American  Legion,  American  Bar  Assn.  O.K.  NBC  Crime  Ban 

(Jack  Gould  in  ”N.  Y.  Times”! 

Already  the  NBC  decision  not  to  carry  horror  epics  before 
9:30  at  night  has  occasioned  enthusiastic  approbation  from  the 
American  Legion,  the  American  Bar  Association  and  countless  parent- 
teacher  groups. 

The  impression  seems  widespread,  in  fact,  that  the  time 
limitation  on  mystery  shows  applies  to  broadcasting  as  a  whole  and 
not  merely  to  only  one  of  the  four  networks.  As  a  matter  of  blunt 
truth,  however,  the  NBC  ban  will  have  little  immediate  effect  on  the 
problem  of  crime  shows  in  relation  to  young  listeners.  It  is  NBC’s 
three  competitors,  Mutual,  ABC  and  CBS  which  always  have  carried  the 
greater  number  of  thrillers  and  chillers,  and  they  have  made  it  plain 
that  they  plan  no  changes  in  their  existing  schedules. 


Indications  of  Television’s  Advertising  Pull 

(Television  Broadcasters'  Assn,  ’’News  Letter” ) 

Television  set  owners  are  highly  responsive  to  offerings 
made  via  video  screen,  recent  programs  aired  in  Chicago  and  New  York 
indicate.  Station  WBKB  in  Chicago,  during  a  telecast  sponsored  by 
Arbee  Food  Products,  demonstrated  a  commercial  item  known  as  the 
”Scrap  Trap”,  a  disposal  device  retailing  for  ^2.19.  An  additional 
month’s  supply  of  paper  bags  free  to  all  viewers  who  phoned  orders 
at  the  close  of  the  show  was  offered.  They  responded  by  swamping 
WBKB ’ s  switchboard  with  more  calls  than  it  could  handle.  Station 
officials  estimate  that  one  out  of  every  38  viewers  in  Chicago 
bought  the  item. 

In  New  York  City  during  the  premier  production  of  John 
Reed  King’s  new  ’’Party  Line"  show  over  WCBS-TV  from  the  Board  Room 
of  the  Music  Corporation  of  America,  over  400  telephone  calls  liter¬ 
ally  swamped  a  33-trunkline,  3-position  switchboard. 

XXXXXXXXXXX 


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TRADE  NOTES 


In  his  broadcast  over  ABC  last  Sunday  night,  Drew  Pearson 
said  Col.  Robert  R.  McCormick,  publisher  of  the  Chicago  Tribune 
and  owner  of  WGN  was  about  to  purchase  an  airplane  for  a  trip  around 
the  world  and  hoped  to  bring  General  MacArthur  back  with  him  in  a 
triumphal  return  from  Japan. 

(This  whole  story  was  very  much  denied  by  the  Wash in gt on 
Times  Herald,  who  said  he  was  going  via  Pan  American  Airways  and 
that  he  was  going  to  Japan  but  doubted  that  General  MacArthur  would 
return  with  Colonel  McCormick  and  his  wife.) 


Grenville  R.  Holden,  formerly  with  OPA  and  Office  of 
strategic  Services  in  Washington,  elected  to  Board  of  Directors  of 
Electronic  Tubes,  Ltd,,  London  affiliate  of  Sylvania  Electric  Prod¬ 
ucts,  Inc .  , 


First  television  pick-up  of  actual  wrestling  matches  in 
Cincinnati  was  made  by  W8XCT,  Crosley’s  experimental  television  sta¬ 
tion  last  Thursday. 


Wayne  Coy,  General  Manager  of  WINX  and  WINX-FM,  Washington 
Post  stations,  has  sent  this  card  to  station  listeners: 

"I  regret  to  inform  you  that  the  WINX,  WINX-FM  Good  Music 
Schedule  will  no  longer  be  published.  The  September  issue  was  the 
last.  The  constantly  increasing  cost  of  the  publication  has  become 
prohibitive, 

"It  is  hoped  that  you  have  enjoyed  the  booklets  in  the 
past,  and  that  you  will  continue  to  enjoy  our  good  music  and  other 
programs.  We,  on  WINX  and  WINX-FM,  shall  always  try  to  bring  you 
the  best," 


Latest  count  shows  that  more  than  1,600  broadcasters  and 
25,000  radio  dealers  will  join  in  the  observance  of  National  Radio 
Week  this  year,  October  26-November  1,  RMA  and  NAB  say. 


Father  and  son  ’’Disc  jockey”  team  of  W0L  in  Washington, 
Michael  Hunnicutt,  Sr,  and  Jr.,  were  pictured  in  the  September  15th 
issue  of  Newsweek.  A  half  hour  juvenile  seg  emceed  every  Saturday 
morning  by  6  year. old  Michael.  Mike,  Sr.  has  dreamed  up  a  series 
of  "dressing”  contests  at  7:45  every  morning  designed  to  help  mothers 
and  dads  rouse  their  offspring  in  time  to  make  their  classes. 

Hunnicutt  invites  young  listeners  to  hop  out  of  bed  giving 
them  five  minutes  to  get  their  duds  on.  Hunnicutt  counts  (by  radar, 
of  course)  the  kids  that  are  dressed  in  time.  They  are  asked  to  send 
in  their  dressing  experiences  with  the  most  unusual  ones  being  award¬ 
ed  prizes. 


Commentator  Walter  Winchell  was  added  to  the  lengthening 
list  of  American  "warmongers”  by  Andrei  Vishinsky,  Soviet  Deputy 
Minister  of  Foreign  Affairs. 


15 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


10/1/47 


Supposed  to  be  radio’s  oldest  regular  performer  is  "The 
Factfinder”  at  WTO P- CBS  Washington.  He  was  77  years  old  September 
26. 

A  member  of  Mrs.  Fiske’s  original  company,  the  actor  was 
understudy  for  George  Arliss  for  five  seasons,  starred  in  Ibsen’s 
•’Ghosts”,  played  with  Nazimova,  Grace  George,  and  other  famed  stage 
personalities  and  was  a  member  of  the  Army  ’’Black  Chamber”  during 
the  first  World  War.  ”The  Factfinder”  began  on  WTOP  in  January  1945 


At  .the  TESMA-TEDPA  annual  convention  and  trade  show  in 
Washington  last  week  was  shown  RCA’s  newly  designed  tube-type  rect¬ 
ifier  which  is  an  improved  model,  contributing  to  a  clear,  bright, 
flickerless  picture  on  the  screen.  It  has  no  moving  part  and  re¬ 
quires  no  power-wasting  and  heat-producing  rheostats. 


Taxicabs  with  two-way  FM  radios  evacuated  thousands  from 
the  flooded  areas  of  New  Orleans  during  the  recent  hurricane. 

With  special  permission  of  the  FCC,  Mayor  De  Lessops  Forri 
son  established  a  dispatch  center  in  his  office  to  direct  the  fleet 
of  100  Checker  Cabs  equipped  with  these  devices. 

It  is  estimated  that  the  100  cabs  did  the  work  of  400 
trucks  as  they  made  instant  response  to  instructions  from  Red  Cross, 
police  and  port  of  embarkation  authorities.  The  drivers  contributed 
their  services,  staying  on  duty  until  the  emergency  was  over. 


Visiting  the  Nation’s  Capital  last  week  was  Maurice  A.  C. 
Gorham,  Director  of  Television  for  the  British  Broadcasting  Corpora¬ 
tion.  Mr.  Gorham  visited  NBC's  Washington  television  station  WNBW. 

Mr.  Gorham  is  in  the  United  States  to  study  American  tele¬ 
vision  programming  and  techniques.  After  visiting  WNBW  and  meeting 
with  the  staff  of  the  station,  Mr.  Gorham  attended  a  demonstration 
of  RCA’s  new  six  by  eight  foot  theatre-size  television  receiver. 


Robert  J.  Burton  has  been  elected  a  Vice  President  of 
Broadcast  Music,  Inc.  Mr.  Burton,  who  joined  BMI  in  January,  1941, 
will  be  in  charge  of  public  relations  and  continue  to  act  as  resi¬ 
dent  counsel. 


Three  1947  sedans  and  *1,000  in  cash  are  being  offered 
retailers  and  their  salesmen  handling  the  RCA  Victor  line  by  the  RCA 
Victor  Home  Instrument  Department  in  a  contest  designed  to  stimulate 
their  knowledge  of  the  company  and  its  products. 


RK0  Television  Corporation  in  New  York  has  sent  a  press 
release  saying  it  will  carry  on  exactly  as  planned  when  the  Corpor¬ 
ation  was  formed  "to  create  and  package  film  shows  for  television 
stations  and  for  advertisers”. 

Ralph  B,  Austrian,  former  RK0  TV  President,  now  Vice-Presi 
dent  of  Foote,  Cone  &  Belding  will  continue  to  serve  RK0  as  consult¬ 
ant. 


XXXXXXXXXXXX 


16 


Founded  in  1924 


NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  Inc. 

GENERAL  LIBRARY 

N. 


HUT  TOWS' 1 ’SERVICE 


Radio  —  Television 

—  FM  — 

Communications 

2400  California  Street,  N.  W. 

Washington  8,  D.  C. 

Robert 

D.  Heinl,  Editor 

Oc 

17 


'*■  8 


Or 


■  'th  f 

T1C 


INDEX  TO  ISSUE  OF  OCTOBER  8,  1947  h.  ^ 


1947 

HU) 


*6o 


’S47 

G£S 


Newest  Station  Credited  With  Selling  TV  To  White  House... . . .....1 

Despite  Denial  Denny  Still  Has  ’Em  Guessing  Re  FCC  Exit. . 3 

WBBM  Is  Given  Citation  For  "Report  Uncensored" .....  . 3 

Fulton  Lewis  To  Sue  Over  Dismissal  By  Farm  Cooperative . 4 

RMA  To  Pass  On  Final  National  Radio  Week  Plans........... . 4 

Federal  Radio  Causes  I.  T.  &  T.  Loss;  Situation  Now  Better. ......... 5 

Syd,  Eiges  Boosted  To  NBC  V-P;  Also  Chas.  P,  Hammond . ...........6 

Walker,  FCC  Vice-Chairman,  Goes  All  Out  For  Television . 6 

Radio  Code  Must  Be  Enforced  To  Be  Constructive...., . 7 

Farnsworth  Sets  Up  Radio  and  Television  Research  Laboratory . 8 

Brunswick  Goes  In  For  Large  Screen  TV  Sets  For  Bars,  Clubs..,., . 8 

Fireworks  Expected  At  TV  Rules  Change  Hearing  Oct,  13.......... . 9 

Petrillo  Again  Puts  Foot  Down  On  FM;  OK’s  Crossing  Picket  Line . 9 

✓ 

441  Radio  Stations  Made  Associated  Press  Associate  Members .........  10 

Radio  Kits,  Inc.  Answer  FTC  False  Advertising  Charge**,..... . 11 

French  Govt*  Turns  To  Radio  To  Rebuff  Press.. . 11 

British  Beat  Argentine  Radio  Set  Embargo  By  Sending  Parts.,., . 12 

Washingtonians  Want  Daylight  Saving  Time  Again,  Poll  Shows . ,...12 

Scissors  And  Paste........... . . . . . . . . ..13 

Trade  Notes . . . . . . . . .15 


No.  1795 


* ;  i 


*  ¥■  « 


f. 


.  *  l  6  •  * 


October  8,  1947 


NEWEST  STATION  CREDITED  WITH  SELLING  TV  TO  WHITE  HOUSE 


According  to  a  reliable  informant  it  took  Washington1 s  baby 
television  station  WMAL-TV,  which  only  went  on  the  air  last  Friday, 
to  sell  televising  to  the  White  House  after  WMAL-TV’ s  older  competit¬ 
ors  WNBW  and  WTTG  had  failed  to  crash  the  gate  on  previous  broadcasts. 
Thus,  our  informant  reveals,  there  was  considerable  surprise  expressed 
by  the  two  Washington  rival  television  stations  to  learn  that  when, 
as  a  result  of  pressur  exerted  by  Kenneth  H.  Berkeley,  General  Manager 
of  WMAL-TV,  President  Truman  had  at  last  consented  to  the  televising 
of  his  address  to  the  nation  on  food  conservation  which  he  delivered 
last  Sunday  night.  It  was  the  first  time  a  President  of  the  United 
States  had  ever  been  televised  addressing  the  people  of  the  nation 
from  the  White  House.  He  had  previously  faced  television  cameras 
but  never  before  at  the  Executive  Mansion. 

Mr.  Berkeley,  it  was  said,  had  been  assured  that  it  was  use¬ 
less  to  try  to  get  the  President  to  reverse  himself.  Nevertheless, 
though  he  was  the  newest  man  in  Washington  in  television,  although 
probably  the  oldest  in  radio,  and  knowing  his  way  around  the  White 
House,  he  decided  to  make  another  try  in  cooperation  with  his  assist¬ 
ant  Bryson  Rasche  and  Burke  Crotty,  WMAL-TV  director. 

Thus  a  great  victory  was  achieved  not  only  for  WMAL-TV  but 
for  the  other  two  Washington  stations  WNBW  and  WTTG  as  the  White 
House  when  it  did  decide  to  act,  let  down  the  bars  to  everyone.  In 
that  way  WPTZ,  Philco’s  station  in  Philadelphia,  WABD,  Dumont,  WCBW-TV, 
CBS,  and  WBNT,  NBC,  all  in  New  York  City,  got  aboard  via  coaxial  cable 
and  WRG,  General  Electric  station  in  Schenectady  by  radio  relay.  The 
first  White  House  television  program  was  directed  by  Mr.  Crotty  of 
WMAL-TV  with  Walter  Compton  of  Dumont  station  WTTG  serving  as  announc¬ 
er.  Technical  facilities,  two  image  orthicon  television  cameras,  and 
technical  staff  were  provided  by  the  NBC  station  WNBW . 

It  is  possible  the  World’s  Series  may  have  had  something  to 
do  with  the  President’s  change  of  heart  about  telecasting  his  European 
food  plea.  Several  television  receivers  had  been  set  up  in  the  White 
House  especially  for  the  World’s  Series,  one  in  the  President’s 
office.  One  story  w as  that  while  talking  v/ith  Henry  J.  Kaiser  Friday, 
Mr.  Truman  was  keeping  a  close  eye  on  the  game.  However,  Mr •  Kaiser 
said  something  which  caused  the  President  to  turn  away  just  as  "Pinch 
Hitter  Cookie  Lavagetto  won  the  game  for  the  Dodgers  in  one  of  the 
most  surprising  plays  in  baseball  history.  Seeing  the  game  suddenly 
ended,  the  perplexed  President  is  reported  to  have  run  out  to  the 
Secretary's  office  to  find  out  what  had  happened. 

According  to  the  dope,  the  sets  installed  in  the  White 
House  were  RCA,  Philco  and  Dumont. 

WMAL-TV  itself  only  went  on  the  air  that  same  Friday  night 
(October  3),  two  days  before  the  presidential  telecast.  It  presented 


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Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


10/8/47 


the  Georgetown-Fordham  football  game  in  Washington  as  its  major 
attraction. 

The  station  is  the  third  television  transmitter  to  begin 
operation  in  Washington  and  the  14th  in  the  country, 

Samuel  H.  Kauffmann,  President  of  The  Evening  Star  Broad¬ 
casting  Co.  in  opening  the  first  program  of  the  new  station,  declar¬ 
ed  operation  of  the  television  station  is  another  step  in  the  news¬ 
paper’s  policy  of  rendering  service  to  the  people  of  Washington, 
Maryland  and  Virginia,  Mr.  Kauffmann  spoke  at  dedicatory  ceremonies 
held  in  WMAL-TV’ s  transmission  station  on  the  American  University 
campus. 


Pointing  out  that  The  Star  has  been  dedicated  to  the  prin¬ 
ciple  of  '’fair  and  impartial  service"  of  all  news  since  its  inception 
in  1952,  and  that  Station  WMAL  has  been  dedicated  to  the  same  type  of 
public  service  since  its  purchase  by  The  Star  in  1938,  Mr.  Kauffmann 
declared: 


"Tonight,  The  Evening  Star  brings  you  still  a  third  ser¬ 
vice  -  a  new  and  exciting  one  -  WMAL  television.  In  the  near  future  - 
WMAL-FM. 


"Through  these  four  communication  services  -  newspaper, 
standard  radio,  frequency  modulation  and  television  -  The  Washington 
Evening  Star  will  continue  its  high  standard  of  service  to  the  people 
of  V/ashington,  Maryland  and  Virginia. 

"WMAL- TV  is  now  on  the  air  -  dedicated  to  serving  you." 

Among  the  congratulatory  messages  received  by  the  station 
were  telegrams  from  Mark  Woods,  President  of  the  American  Broadcast¬ 
ing  Company;  Edward  T.  Noble,  ABC  Board  Chairman;  Bob  Kintner,  ABC 
Vice  President,  and  Frank  M.  Folsom,  Vice  President  of  the  RCA  Victor 
Division. 


Setting  a  new  speed  record  as  the  broadcast  industry’s 
quickest  installation  of  a  complete  television  station,  WMAL-TV  went 
on  the  air  with  the  nation’s  first  high  band  television  transmitter 
less  than  a  month  after  delivery  of  the  RCA  transmitter  and  other 
equipment . 


The  5-kilowatt  television  transmitter  and  complete  station 
equipment  were  delivered  to  WMAL-TV  at  the  beginning  of  September  and 
were  completely  installed  by  the  station’s  engineers  in  time  to  tele¬ 
cast  the  football  game  Friday  night. 

Following  the  dedication  of  the  new  station,  WMAL-TV  got 
off  to  its  official  program  start,  showing  a  newsreel  and  a  short 
subject.  Then,  about  8:23  P.M,  the  scene  switched  to  Griffith  Stad¬ 
ium  for  the  football  game.  It  also  began  carrying  the  World’s  Series 
games  Saturday. 


XXXXXXXXXX 


Heinl  Radio  News  Service 


10/8/47 


DESPITE  DENIAL  DENNY  STILL  HAS  ’EM  GUESSING  RE  FCC  EXIT 


Although  Charles  R.  Denny,  Chairman  of  the  Federal  Communi¬ 
cations  Commission  denied  last  Sunday  that  he  would  resign  from  the 
Commission  January  1st,  a  rumor  still  persisted  that  he  would  eventu¬ 
ally  accept  an  offer  which  is  now  pretty  generally  believed  to  have 
been  made  to  him  to  succeed  Judge  A.  L.  Ashby  as  General  Counsel  of 
the  National  Broadcasting  Company  and  that  the  deal  as  yet  had  not 
been  closed. 

When  the  question  was  put  up  to  Mr.  Denny,  he  said: 

”1  have  no  plans  for  leaving  the  FCC.  I  am  going  to  clean 
up  a  few  left-overs  from  the  International  Telecommunication  Confer¬ 
ence  and  then  take  a  twenty  day  vacation.” 

That  would  be  one  day  for  every  week  the  Telecommunications 
Conference  over  which  Mr.  Denny  presided  has  been  in  session  at 
Atlantic  City,  It  concluded  last  week  when  representatives  from  78 
nations  signed  two  important  basic  international  agreements  in  the 
field  of  communications. 

One  of  the  documents  is  a  treaty  known  as  the  International 
Telecommunications  Convention  of  Atlantic  City,  the  other  an  agree¬ 
ment  governing  the  technical  and  operating  phases  of  international 
radio  communications,  known  as  the  International  Radio  Regulations  of 
Atlantic  City.  They  brought  the  international  machinery  and  regula¬ 
tions  in  the  communications  field  abreast  of  the  technical  develop¬ 
ments  since  the  conference  at  Cairo  ten  years  ago. 

Mr.  Denny  also  served  as  Chairman  of  a  third  conference, 
intended  to  work  out  high  frequency  problems,  which  was  reduced  to  a 
preparatory  meeting  in  Atlantic  City  with  a  regular  session  set  for 
Mexico  City  in  1948  on  that  phase  of  radio  operations. 

"We  have  firm  confidence  that  the  machinery  we  have  set  up 
and  the  regulations  which  we  have  written  will  insure  that  radio  will 
attain  its  maximum  contribution  to  the  education,  safety,  and  comfort 
of  men  everywhere" ,  Mr.  Denny  said. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

WBBM  IS  GIVEN  CITATION  FOR  "REPORT  UNCENSORED" 

WBBM,  Chicago,  received  a  special  award  October  1  in  recog¬ 
nition  of  its  radio  series,  "Report  Uncensored”,  which  dealt  with 
study  of  juvenile  delinquency  in  Chicago  and  Cook  County.  The  award, 
in  the  form  of  a  gold  scroll,  was  presented  H.  Leslie  Atlass,  CBS 
Vice-President,  by  the  John  Howard  Association,  organization  dedicat¬ 
ed  to  rehabilitation  of  persons  after  penal  confinement. 

XXXXXXXXXXX 


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10/8/47 


FULTON  LEWIS  TO  SUE  OVER  DISMISSAL  BY  FARM  COOPERATIVE 


Fulton  Lewis,  Jr.,  news  commentator  for  the  Mutual  Broad¬ 
casting  System,  who  was  dismissed  from  membership  in  the  Southern 
States  Cooperative  Farm  Organization  said  last  Saturday  he  had  decid¬ 
ed  to  appeal  the  action  to  the  State  courts. 

Dismissal  of  Mr.  Lewis,  owner  of  a  250-acre  farm  near 
Leonardtown,  Md. ,  came  after  a  day-long  session  in  Richmond,  Va.,  of 
the  14-member  Board  of  the  organization  which  claims  to  have  211,000 
farmer  members  in  six  States. 

Charging  him  with  "lack  of  sympathy  with  the  objectives  of 
the  farmers",  the  cooperative  asserted  Mr.  Lewis  had  embarked  on  a 
radio  "propaganda  campaign"  designed  to  "mislead  the  public  into 
believing  that  farmer  cooperatives  are  socialistic,  if  not  communistic 
and  are  tax  dodgers." 

The  Board  found  that  Mr.  Lewis  "in  his  public  utterances 
beginning  February  20,  1947  and  continuing  at  frequent  intervals,  has 
acted  and  is  acting  contrary  to  the  aims  and  purposes  and  the  best 
interests  of  this  Association." 

Consequently  the  Board  resolved  "that  by  reason  of  the  fore¬ 
going  findings,  Fulton  Lewis,  Jr.,  be  and  he  is  hereby  dismissed  from 
membership  in  this  Association  and  that  he  hereafter  be  denied  the 
rights  and  privileges  of  membership." 

The  radio  commentator,  who  appeared  at  the  sessions  in 
Richmond  with  his  attorneys,  claimed  he  "had  no  reasonable  opportun¬ 
ity  to  defend  himself." 

He  called  the  meeting  "a  star  chamber  proceeding,  a  drum¬ 
head  court-martial,  with  unsubstantial  accusations,  without  support 
in  proof  and  fact." 

Declining  an  appeal  to  the  cooperative’s  annual  membership 
meeting  in  Richmond  November  10,  Mr.  Lewis  said  he  would  take  his 
case  to  court. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

RMA  TO  PASS  ON  FINAL  NATIONAL  RADIO  WEEK  PLANS 

Final  plans  for  observance  of  National  Radio  Week,  Oct.  26, 
in  which  the  nation’s  broadcasters  will  participate  as  co-sponsors, 
will  be  presented  to  the  annual  Radio  Manufacturers’  Association’s 
Fall  Conclave  in  New  York,  Monday,  October  13. 

The  Advertising  Committee,  with  Vice  Chairman  Victor  A. 
Irvine,  of  Chicago,  presiding,  will  meet  Tuesday  afternoon,  October 
14th,  to  review  the  National  Radio  Week  program  and  the  progress  of 
the  continuing  Radio- in-Every-Room  sales  promotion  campaign. 


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The  Board  of  Directors  meeting,  presided  over  by  President 
Max  F.  Balcom,  of  Emporium,  Pa.,  will  highlight  a  series  of  committee 
meetings  extending  over  four  days.  The  RMA  Directors  will  meet  on 
V/ednesday,  October  15,  at  the  new  headquarters  of  the  Institute  of 
Radio  Engineers,  1  East  79th  Street,  on  invitation  of  IRE  President, 

W.  R.  G.  Baker,  of  Syracuse,  N.  Y.,  who  is  also  an  RMA  Director  and 
head  of  the  Engineering  Department.  All  other  meetings  will  be  at 
the  Roosevelt  Hotel  as  usual. 

Several  new  projects  for  aiding  television  broadcasters  and 
promoting  televisions  development  will  be  considered  by  the  RMA. 

Board  of  Directors,  along  with  a  variety  of  new  Association  service 
for  RMA  members. 

The  first  sessions  will  be  held  Monday  morning,  October  13, 
when  five  sections  of  the  RMA  Parts  Division  hold  membership  meetings. 
On  the  following  day,  the  Executive  Committees  of  the  Set  Division, 
under  Chairman  Paul  V.  Galvin,  of  Chicago,  and  the  Executive  Committee 
and  Section  Chairmen  of  the  Parts  Division,  under  Chairman  J.  J.  Kahn, 
of  Chicago,  will  meet,  along  with  members  of  the  RMA  Tube  Division, 
under  Chairman  R.  E.  Carlson,  of  Newark,  N.  J.  The  Transmitter 
Division  Executive  Committee  and  Section  Chairmen,  under  Chairman 
S.  P.  Taylor,  of  New  York,  will  meet  Thursday  morning,  October  16. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

FEDERAL  RADIO  CAUSES  I.T.&  T.  LOSS;  SITUATION  NOW  BETTER 

Reporting  a  consolidated  net  loss  of  $3,109,870  for  six 
months  ending  last  June,  as  compared  with  a  similar  loss  of  $1,230,611 
for  the  corresponding  period  of  1946,  Sosthenes  Behn,  Chairman  of  the 
International  Telephone  and  Telegraph  Corporation,  said: 

?,The  consolidated  net  loss  for  both  periods  is  attribut¬ 
able  to  the  losses  of  Federal  Telephone  and  Radio  Corporation,  the 
manufacturing  subsidiary  in  the  United  States.  The  losses  of  Federal, 
which  have  continued  through  the  third  quarter  of  1947,  are  disappoint¬ 
ing.  The  Management,  however,  can  now  advise  that  considerable  pro¬ 
gress  has  been  made  in  solving  many  conversion  problems  and  that 
since  the  recent  solution  of  Federal’s  labor  difficulties,  production 
has  been  increasing  and  the  results  from  operations  of  Federal  are 
showing  steady  improvement. 

Unfilled  orders  of  Federal  now  total  approximately 
a44,100,000  as  compared  with  $38,600,000  at  December  31,  1946* 

Cash  advances  to  Federal  for  working  capital  and  plant  con¬ 
struction  and  equipment  in  1947  to  date  total  $22,480,000. 

XXXXXXXX 


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SYD.  EIGES  BOOSTED  TO  NBC  V-P;  ALSO  CHAS.  P.  HAMMOND 


Two  more  NBC  executives  now  have  "Vice-President”  painted 
on  the  doors  of  their  offices  in  New  York.  They  are  Sydney  H.  Eiges, 
Manager  of  the  Press  Department,  and  Charles  P.  Hammond,  Assistant  to 
the  Executive  Vice-President. 

As  Vice-President  in  Charge  of  Press,  Mr.  Eiges  will  con¬ 
tinue  to  report  to  Frank  E.  Mullen,  Executive  Vice-President. 

Mr.  Hammond  was  named  assistant  to  Mr.  Mullen  earlier  this 
month.  He  will  assist  the  Executive  Vice  President  on  various  oper¬ 
ational  matters,  especially  those  concerned  with  sound  broadcasting. 

Mr.  Eiges  came  to  NBC  as  a  writer  in  the  Press  Department 

in  1941.  A  year  later  he  was  made  Assistant  Manager  and  on  Jan.  3. 
1945,  Manager.  Before  he  joined  NBC  he  was  with  International  News 

Service  for  11  years,  latterly  as  night  editor  and  cable  editor  in 
the  New  York  office.  He  was  graduated  from  the  University  of  Pitts¬ 
burgh. 


Until  his  recent  appointment,  Mr.  Hammond,  a  graduate  of 
Cornell,  was  Director  of  Advertising  and  Promotion  for  NBC,  a  posi¬ 
tion  he  had  held  since  1944.  He  jointed  the  network  in  1943,  leaving 
a  post  as  Manager  of  the  Advertising  Bureau  of  the  American  Newspaper 
Publishers’  Association.  Prior  to  that  he  was  a  reporter  on  the  New 
York  Post,  the  New  York  World  and  also  worked  on  the  old  Literary 
Digest. 


XXXXXXXXXXX 

WALKER ,  FCC  VICE-CHAIRMAN,  GOES  ALL  OUT  FOR  TELEVISION 

There  were  no  if s ,  ands  or  maybes  about  what  Paul  A.  Walker, 
Vice-Chairman  of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  said  about 
television  last  week.  Speaking  in  an  NBC  television  salute  to  the 
inauguration  of  General  Electric  regularly  relaying  its  programs 
back  and  forth  from  New  York  to  its  television  station  WRGB  in 
Schenectady  by  microwave,  Chairman  Walker  declared  that  of  all  the 
new  developments  "television  promises  to  take  the  lead  as  the  most 
forceful  mass  communication  medium  of  our  times." 

The  FCC  official  continued: 

"For  many  of  you  in  the  Schenectady-Troy-Albany  area,  tele¬ 
vision  is  no  longer  a  novelty.  Your  community  is  one  of  the  few  in 
the  United  States  where  television  service  has  been  available  for 
some  years.  You  have  been  fortunate  in  having  one  of  the  pioneer 
television  stations  -  General  Electric’s  WRGB  -  right  in  your  midst. 
You  have  come  a  long  way  since  the  first  experimental  efforts  of  G.E. 
in  1928.  You  have  even  enjoyed  a  relay  television  system,  connected 
with  New  York  City,  since  1940. 


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"Some  of  us  of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  were 
present  at  that  time  to  witness  the  earlier  relay  operations.  The 
relay  system  which  we  are  inaugurating  tonight  is  still  another  step 
forward  in  the  history  of  television  -  and  will  bring  to  your  area 
more  and  better  programs.  This  new  transmission  system  will  provide 
a  great  improvement  in  the  pictures  you  receive  and  enable  WRGB  to 
transmit  daytime  programs  from  New  York. 

"Your  station  at  Schenectady  is  one  of  twelve  now  on  the 
air  in  eight  cities.  Fifty-six  additional  stations  are  now,  or  soon 
will  be,  under  construction  throughout  the  United  States. 

"The  relay  system  being  used  for  the  first  time  tonight 
between  Schenectady  and  New  York  forges  another  link  in  the  nation¬ 
wide  television  chain  which  lies  ahead. 

"The  day  is  not  far  distant  when  you  in  the  Schenectady 
area  will  be  able  to  see  television  programs  originating  not  only  in 
New  York  -  but  in  Boston,  Los  Angeles,  Miami  and  other  distant  places. 
In  the  early  days  of  our  country,  the  pioneers  built  vital  roads 
across  the  wilderness.  Today,  electronic  highways  serve  to  bind  our 
people  closer  together,  making  neighbors  of  us  all." 

XXXXXXXXXX 

RADIO  CODE  MUST  BE  ENFORCED  TO  BE  CONSTRUCTIVE 

Relief  of  excessive  commercialism  in  broadcasting  is  the 
responsibility  of  radio  executives  directing  the  industry,  Jack  Gould, 
Radio  Editor  of  The  New  York  Times,  said  at  the  luncheon  meeting  of 
the  Radio  Executives  Club  at  the  Hotel  Roosevelt. 

He  told  the  radio  men  that  in  being  committed  to  the  adop¬ 
tion  of  a  code  to  correct  such  abuses,  the  code  would  have  to  consti¬ 
tute  a  positive  step  in  meeting  the  issue.  The  code  is  scheduled  to 
become  effective  February  1,  after  final  approval  by  the  National 
Association  of  Broadcasters  Board  of  Directors  at  its  November  meet¬ 
ing. 

Means  of  enforcing  the  code  also  will  have  to  be  determined 
if  it  is  to  be  a  constructive  instrument,  he  said. 

XXXXXXXX 

Replying  to  the  attack  upon  him  by  Vichinsky,  Soviet  Deputy 
Foreign  Minister,  Walter  Winchell,  ABC  commentator,  said; 

"I  do  not  flatter  myself  that  you  intended  to  attack  me 
personally.  You  struck  back  at  a  member  of  the  American  press  because 
there  is  nothing  in  the  world  that  you  -  and  Mr.  Stalin  -  fear  more 
than  a  man  with  a  free  typewriter  and  a  microphone." 

XXXXXXXXXX 


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FARNSWORTH  SETS  UP  RADIO  AND  TELEVISION  RESEARCH  LABORATORY 


Farnsworth  Television  &  Radio  Corporation  has  incorporated 
in  Indiana  the  Farnsworth  Research  Corporation  to  handle  all  research 
and  patent  activities  of  the  parent  company. 

"With  the  advent  of  commercial  television,  more  emphasis 
is  being  placed  on  television  research  and  manufacturing  of  televi¬ 
sion  products”,  E.  A.  Nicholas,  President  of  the  company,  said. 
•’Separation  of  research  and  its  related  patent  activities  from  the 
parent  company Ts  manufacturing  activities  is  in  keeping  with  the 
trend  in  industry  today. 

William  Clausen  has  been  appointed  Manager  of  Operations 
for  Farnsworth.  He  will  be  responsible  for  all  manufacturing  and 
related  activities  at  the  company’s  plants.  Prior  to  joining  the 
Farnsworth  company,  he  was  Vice  President  and  General  Manager  of 
Victor  Products  Corporation,  Hagerstown,  Maryland. 

XXXXXXXX 


BRUNSWICK  GOES  IN  FOR  LARGE  SCREEN  TV  SETS  FOR  BARS,  CLUBS 


Radio  and  Television,  Inc.,  producers  of  Brunswick  radios, 
last  week  introduced  its  first  television  received  in  a  press  demon¬ 
stration  in  New  York.  The  set  has  a  screen  48  by  36  inches,  and  is 
designed  for  hotels,  bars,  clubs  and  other  public  places.  It  will 
include  FM-AM  radio  facilities,  a  wire  recorder,  and  an  automatic 
record  changer. 

Retail  prices  have  been  set  from  ^2,000  to  f3,000,  depend¬ 
ing  upon  the  facilities  ordered.  Intial  shipments  will  be  made  in 
the  next  four  or  five  weeks,  David  Kahn,  Chairman  of  Board  said  and 
estimated  the  number  of  customers  at  100. 

The  company  also  announced  that  two  home  console  television 
sets  with  10  and  15  inch  direct  view  screens,  now  are  in  production. 
Deliveries  will  be  made  in  six  to  eight  weeks.  The  sets  also  have 
FM-AM  radio,  wire  recorders  and  phonograph  facilities.  They  will 
retail  from  $375  to  $1,100. 

XXXXXXXXXXXX 

Radar  storm-spotting  eauipment,  apparatus  for  transmitting 
weather  maps  by  radio  or  wire  to  distant  points,  and  a  mechanism  for 
measuring  the  height  of  cloud  ceilings  over  airports  were  among  the 
features  of  a  show  put  on  by  the  Air  Weather  Service  of  the  U.  S. 

Air  Force  for  delegates  of  the  First  Meteorological  Organization  con¬ 
vention  in  Washington  last  week. 

XXXXXXXX 


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FIREWORKS  EXPECTED  AT  TV  RULES  CHANGE  HEARING  OCT.  13 


If  predictions  come  true  there  will  be  a  warm  welcome  home 
from  the  nice  long  Summer  siesta  at  the  International  Telecommunica¬ 
tions  Conferences  at  Atlantic  City  when  Federal  Communications  mem¬ 
bers  make  their  first  formal  Fall  appearance  in  Washington  next 
Monday,  October  13,  to  hear  arguments  on  the  matter  of  proposed 
amendments  to  the  rules  governing  the  sharing  of  television  channels 
with  other  services  and  the  proposed  deletion  of  Television  Channel 
No,  1,  44  to  50  me.  This  channel  would  be  assigned  to  non-govern¬ 
ment  fixed  and  mobile  services. 

By  reducing  the  television  channels  from  13  to  12  some  six 
cities,  including  Chicago,  would  lose  a  television  availability. 
Allocations  in  11  other  areas  would  also  be  affected. 

The  proposed  change  has  also  aroused  the  ire  of  the  Fre¬ 
quency  Modulation  people  as  it  is  charged  that  FM  would  also  be 
adversely  affected.  Major  Edwin  H,  Armstrong,  inventor  of  FM,  is 
reported  to  be  on  the  warpath  and  is  expected  to  be  FM’s  star  wit¬ 
ness,  The  National  Association  of  Broadcasters  is  in  the  scrap  with 
the  argument  that  there  are  more  than  20  FM  stations  now  operating  in 
this  band  ’’and  thousands  of  listeners  use  FM  receivers  not  able  to 
be . tuned  to  the  new  FM  bands.  Finally  the  only  FM  network  now  in 
existence  operates  in  this  band.  Any  action  which  will  narrow  the 
already  limited  portion  of  the  spectrum  allocated  to  AM,  FM  or  TV 
will  not  serve  the  public  interest.” 

The  Federal  Communications  Commission  has  announced  that 
any  request  for  the  assignment  of  any  frequency  within  the  band 
44-50  or  72-76  will  be  held  up  until  the  outcome  of  next  Monday’s 
meeting  is  known. 

XXXXXXXXXX 

PETRILLO  AGAIN  PUTS  FOOT  DOWN  ON  FM;  OX’S  CROSSING  PICKET  LINE 

Hopes  of  FM  stations  faded  Monday  when  James  C.  Petrillo, 
President  of  the  American  Federation  of  Musicians,  stated  that  his 
original  decision  stood  banning  the  duplication  of  network  musical 
programs  over  both  standard  and  frequency  modulation  stations.  Thus 
the  FM  Association, which  had  been  fighting  for  at  least  a  temporary 
respite,  lost  another  round. 

On  the  other  hand,  Petrillo  granted  permission  to  Station 
WHFM,  Rochester,  N.  Y. ,  to  resume  its  weekly  broadcasts  of  the 
Rochester  Philharmonic  Orchestra,  a  sponsored  feature  on  the  Conti¬ 
nental  (FM)  Network. 

The  action  by  the  musicians’  union  head  rescinded  the  earl¬ 
ier  order  which  had  forbidden  such  broadcasts  on  the  new  network  of 
FM  stations. 


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It  is  understood  that  the  music  union  president  was  con¬ 
vinced,  on  reconsideration,  that  a  contract  between  the  station  and 
the  orchestra,  which  had  been  approved  by  the  AFM  local,  was  a  bind¬ 
ing  instrument,  and  that  his  order  forbidding  the  broadcasts  would 
have  opened  the  AFM  to  suit  under  the  Taft-Hartley  Act. 

Petrillo  characterized  picketing  of  Senator  Taft  during 
his  current  speaking  tour  as  "wrong  and  not  the  American  way”. 

"Any  American  has  the  right  to  speak  his  mind",  Mr,  Petrillo 
was  auoted  as  saying,  "no  matter  how  much  you  might  dislike  him." 

The  paper  says  Mr.  Petrillo  explained  the  matter  was  brought 
to  his  attention  when  the  Des  Moines  local  of  the  AFM  asked  whether 
it  should  cross  picket  lines  expected  when  Senator  Taft  addresses  the 
annual  convention  of  the  Iowa  Bankers*  Association  next  Wednesday. 

"I  told  the  local  that  it  should  pass  the  line  by  all  means" 

he  said. 


The  first  move  by  an  employer  to  resort  to  the  Taft-Hartley 
Law  for  relief  from  union  "feather-bedding"  practices  was  made  by  the 
•State  Theatre  in  Hartford,  Conn.,  in  an  unfair  labor  practices  case. 
The  theatre  has  filed  a  complaint  with  the  National  Labor  Relations 
Board  in  Boston. 

Accused  of  "feather-bedding",  or  forcing  the  employer  to 
hire  and  pay  more  men  than  he  needs,  is  the  Hartford  local  of  the 
American  Federation  of  Musicians.  The  theatre  filed  the  papers  on 
Sept,  19  against  Local  400,  Hartford  Musicians  Protective  Association. 

The  basis  of  the  theatre’s  charge  is  a  clause  in  the  Taft- 
Hartley  Act  pronouncing  it  an  unfair  labor  practice  for  a  union  to 
force  an  employer  to  pay  "in  the  nature  of  an  exaction  for  services 
which  are  not  performed,  or  not  to  be  performed." 

XXXXXXXXXX 

441  RADIO  STATIONS  MADE  ASSOCIATED  PRESS  ASSOCIATE  MEMBERS 

Four  hundred  and  forty-one  radio  stations  were  elected  to 
associate  membership  in  the  Associated  Press  last  Friday  in  New  York 
by  the  Board  of  Directors. 

The  stations  included  all  those  owned  and  operated  by  the 
National  Broadcasting  Co.,  the  Columbia  Broadcasting  System,  the 
Texas  State  Network,  Inc.,  the  Yankee  Network,  Inc.,  which  operates 
in  New  England  and  the  Don  Lee  Broadcasting  System,  which  operates  on 
the  West  Coast, 

The  Associated  Press,  world-wide  news  organization,  has  two 
types  of  membership.  Regular  members  are  required  to  supply  their 
news  exclusively  to  the  AP.  Associate  members,  which  include  both 
newspapers  and  radio  stations,  supply  their  news  on  a  non-exclusive 
basis.  Associate  members  do  not  vote.  AP  facilities  are  shared  by 
both  classes  of  members. 


XXXXXXXXXX 


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RADIO  KITS,  INC.  ANSWER  FTC  FALSE  ADVERTISING  CHARGE 


Radio  Kits,  Inc.,  120  Cedar  St.,  New  York,  has  filed  an 
answer  denying  charges  in  a  Federal  Trade  Commission  complaint  of 
false  and  misleading  advertising  of  "radio  kits” • 

The  answer  declares  that  one  of  the  kits  referred  to  in  the 
complaint  is  no  longer  being  manufactured,  and  that  some  of  the 
challenged  representations  have  been  discontinued.  Otherwise,  it 
denies  the  allegations  of  the  complaint  with  respect  to  the  falsity 
of  the  corporation’s  advertisements,  alleging  that  ’’many  thousands 
of  people  have  built  their  own  radios  from  our  kits”. 

The  complaint  charged,  among  other  things,  that  the  res¬ 
pondents  falsely  advertised  that  their  kits  contain  all  the  necessary 
parts  for  the  building  of  a  radio  and  that  any  individual  can  build 
a  complete  radio  from  the  parts  contained  in  the  kits  without  any 
assistance  provided  he  follows  the  diagrams  and  instructions  supplied 
with  then.  It  also  took  issue  with  representations  as  to  the  broad¬ 
cast  reception  afforded  by  such  sets  and  as  to  the  origin  of  the 
parts  in  the  kits. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

FRENCH  GOVT.  TURNS  TO  RADIO  TO  REBUFF  PRESS 

French  Government  departments  are  replying  by  radio  broad¬ 
casts  to  criticism  in  the  press.  So  far  these  replies  have  been  t o 
criticisms  of  economic  policy  as  carried  out  by  Government  departments. 

Such  responses,  when  made,  are  introduced  along  with  the 
news  summary  under  a  heading  of  their  own,  ’’Avant  de  juger,  il  faut 
savoir,”  (Before  passing  Judgment,  one  must  know  the  facts.)  There 
is  also  a  set  apology  for  them,  the  speaker  announcing  that  as  Govern¬ 
ment  departments  have  no  newspaper,  their  only  means  of  replying  to 
statements  is  by  way  of  the  radio. 

There  is  no  lag  between  the  offending  article  and  the  re¬ 
joinder,  to  judge  by  the  most  recent  instance.  France-Soir  carried 
a  banner  line  on  page  one.  ”In  order  to  bring  down  prices  in  France 
there  must  be  an  end  to  the  exportation  of  90%  of  national  produc¬ 
tion. 


The  same  evening  a  spokesman  of  the  Government’s  depart¬ 
ment  involved  made  a  categorical  denial  of  the  statement,  and  then 
criticized  the  article,  paragraph  by  paragraph.  The  spokesman’s 
arguments  were  also  a  defense  of  the  planned  economy  as  now  practiced 
in  France. 


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BRITISH  BEAT  ARGENTINE  RADIO  SET  EMBARGO  BY  SENDING  PARTS 


An  arrangement  has  been  entered  into  between  a  British 
radio  manufacturer  and  the  largest  engineering  concern  in  Buenos 
Aires,  Argentina,  whereby  British  radio  parts  will  be  shipped  in  un¬ 
finished  form  to  Argentina  where  they  will  be  assembled  and  placed  on 
the  market  almost  as  soon  as  the  manufactured  product  appears  in  the 
United  Kingdom,  according  to  the  U.  S.  Commerce  Department.  The 
agreement  covers  a  5-year  period* 

The  Argentine  concern  will  be  furnished  complete  test 
equipment  and  jigs,  as  well  as  the  necessary  technical  knowledge  and 
assistance  for  completion  of  the  imported  sets,  which  are  reported  to 
be  much  in  demand.  This  method  of  handling  Argentine  imports  of  Bri¬ 
tish  radio  equipment  was  made  necessary,  the  report  states,  by  an 
embargo  placed  by  the  Argentine  Government  on  the  importation  of  com¬ 
plete  radio  sets. 


XXXXXXXXXX 

WASHINGTONIANS  WANT  DAYLIGHT  SAVING  TIME  AGAIN,  POLL  SHOWS 

The  majority  of  Washingtonians,  thinking  over  their  Summer 
experience,  feel  Washington  should  go  on  daylight  saving  time  again 
next  Summer. 

Sixty-six  per  cent  of  the  residents  in  this  area  favor 
pushing  the  clocks  ahead  next  Summer.  A  minority  of  27  per  cent  hope 
the  city  will  stick  to  standard  time.  The  remainder  are  undecided. 

Nearby  residents  of  Maryland  and  Virginia  are  as  much  in 
favor  of  the  extra  hour  of  daylight  as  those  living  in  the  District. 

Asked  how  they  feel  about  daylight  saving  time  after  bein 
on  it  a  while,  50  per  cent  enthusiastically  said  they  like  it  very  much. 
An  additional  25  per  cent  like  it  fairly  well,  and  only  23  per  cent 
don’t  like  it  at  all.  The  rest  were  indifferent. 

XXXXXXXXXX 


A  joint  press  release  sent  out  by  the  three  television  sta¬ 
tions  in  Washington  -  WMAL-TV,  WNBW,  and  WTTG  -  states  that  when 
President  Truman  delivered  his  food  conservation  address  last  Sunday 
night,  he  "could  be  seen  by  the  television  audience  gathered  before 
the  58,000  receivers  known  to  be  installed  in  the  four  cities  where 
the  White  House  telecast  was  received  (Washington,  New  York,  Phila¬ 
delphia  and  Schenectady)  -  an  estimated  audience  of  well  over  100,000 
people," 


XXXXXXXX 


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